Cantering in galloping position easier than sitting

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I noticed recently how much less exerting i find cantering while standing up in the stirrups than when I canter in a deep seat. Does anyone else feel the same?

I hadn't got my bum out of the saddle for ages until I did it the other day and I found it took way less effort than a deep seat.

I'm not sure why.. I wonder is it because when I sit I have to absorb the horses movement whereas when I stand in the stirrups i just cruise along above him.

The beast is about 16 1" or 16 2" with a big stride and I'm only 5 2". I wonder is it the mismatch in size? I also find small, narrower horse's trots easier to ride.

Does anyone else notice the same and if so do you think the size of the horse's stride has something to do with it? I'm just a bit curious πŸ‡
 
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EKW

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I find it's how the horse goes that affects me. I can sit to canter all day long on a Horse that is collected and rounded but not one that bobs along with its nose poked out. I obviously spend much more time up out of my seat than in it but don't find the swop over hard when I do get on my own sparodically
 

be positive

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I find it's how the horse goes that affects me. I can sit to canter all day long on a Horse that is collected and rounded but not one that bobs along with its nose poked out. I obviously spend much more time up out of my seat than in it but don't find the swop over hard when I do get on my own sparodically
It does help with sitting if the horse goes well and I don't find size makes any real difference in the cater, I am about the same height as the OP and tend to get up out of the saddle when hacking so the horse can move more freely, preferring to sit when schooling so I can work them in a more round way, sometimes if sitting is hard it is because the horse is not coming through and working correctly, is stiff through the hind leg or back, is tending to pull the rider forward because it goes onto the forehand or possibly a combination of them all.

Trotting is often easier on something with less movement so size can be more of a factor than it normally is in canter where a big moving horse can be smoother and often easier to sit once it is at a certain level.

It does help with your riding if you feel you fit the horse, being on something that is a bit big or wide can effect how you sit and if you are not careful you can end up riding with the handbrake on slightly in an effort to control the stride or power to make it a little easier.
 

Red-Nose

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Cantering on a balanced horse with long stirrups is easier than forward seat.

The balance of the saddle also has a bearing, as does weather you are on the flat or up/down hill.

I often use a forward seat when warming up a baby (or even older horse) to allow the horse to free up.
 
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I do loads of hacking and i always stand in canter, i could do that all day long, ive recently been having lessons and im knackered sitting in canter after a short time.
 
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I'm the opposite, I find it so difficult to canter or gallop in a proper forward seat. I can canter in a lighter seat when schooling if needed but to do proper two point I need to balance on the neck >.<
 

oldie48

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For me it's about the quality of the canter I can sit all day on a horse that it using it's back correctly even if it's not a particularly collected canter, but once the back is tight I really struggle as although I have a good core I am stiff in my lower back so find it difficult to absorb the movement.
 
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I have to spend a lot of time out of the seat when cantering due to a couple of operations on my pelvis....much nicer for me and my horse.
 
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I find it easier to control the canter more from a deep seat. If we're in the school and I want to collect and shorten, I don't have the balance to do it from a light seat. If I want him to open and stretch on a long uphill canter, I think we do that better when I'm in light seat. If he's in a bit of a forward or spooky mood, I'll canter with a deep seat. He is very light in the mouth and responds to the seat better (yes, I ride a heavy horse but don't underestimate him)
 

teapot

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There's a lot of difference between standing up in your stirrups and being a true light seat though! In a true light seat with shortened stirrups you're still absorbing the movement, through your legs and ankles, not your seat. Standing up is just well standing up.

I do a lot of light seat in my flatwork lessons to loosen the horses off, before sitting on the canter properly. Each type requries its own amount of fitness, especially with five holes of difference in my stirrup length from flat to light seat.
 

Cortez

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Cantering in a forward/light/half/jumping seat may be easier for the rider, but it puts the horse on the forehand and removes any chance of the rider being able to use the seat to help the horse. It's sometimes necessary for young horses that are very unbalanced and weak, but I'd always sit in the horse in canter as soon as it's able to carry it's back (and rider).
 
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Some interesting ideas here.
I had a lesson today and was able to get him to use himself much better than I do when I don't have eyes on the ground. Interestingly, the canter didn't tire me at all. He had that lovely bouncy canter that I only sometimes manage to get.

As to whether I'm absorbing the movement in the light seat, I don't know..
I figure if I wasn't I'd feel unbalanced or it would be jarring?

i've also lost a good bit of weight recently (I needed to). It could be that rather than the light seat that's making the difference. Anyway, it's a good incentive to make sure the beast uses himself correctly. πŸŽπŸ‡
 

scats

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I often get off their backs for the first canter of a session and I generally ride in light seat in canter out hacking.
Both my girls have comfortable canters though- I could sit to them all day.
 

Goldenstar

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Horses for courses and riders for horses.
Very often the the rider finds the off the back seat easier and often then will slightly in front of the movement when they do the horse is then carrying them with the shoulders and is on its forehand .
Cantering and galloping off the the horses back in balance with the movement with the seat close to but not on the saddle is very hard work and it’s a balance trick once learned never forgotten .
And it’s easy if you do it a lot .
Sitting in the canter engages the the lower part of your back and core and pelvis much more again the more you do it the easier it becomes .
 
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I sit for schooling (mostly), and I sit on hacks if I think we're going to be a pillock about something. I get off their backs for fast work, and for jumping. Sometimes I stand high off them, XC style, sometimes I'm only in a half-seat. It depends what we're doing, and whether the horse is a twit or not!
 

Keith_Beef

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In lessons, we usually do a mix of both. We'll canter around the arena doing two laps seated, two laps up. Repeat. Slow to a trot and then a walk to let us (riders and horses) get our breath back, then change hands and repeat.

This is at the end of warm-up, before we start doing whatever the real subject of the lesson is.

I don't think I really prefer one over the other, but just like some horses have a more comfortable trot than others, I find seated canter more difficult on certain horses and easier on others.
 
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In lessons, we usually do a mix of both. We'll canter around the arena doing two laps seated, two laps up. Repeat. Slow to a trot and then a walk to let us (riders and horses) get our breath back, then change hands and repeat.

This is at the end of warm-up, before we start doing whatever the real subject of the lesson is.

I don't think I really prefer one over the other, but just like some horses have a more comfortable trot than others, I find seated canter more difficult on certain horses and easier on others.
That's a good idea. I think I'll try it. It would be good for my fitness.

To be fair to the beast he does have a lovely canter especially when it's more collected. It's his rider that needs to improve πŸ˜‰
 
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