Clueless Liverys??

walkers_dream

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not a livery but my old YO thinks its okay to beat the crap out of a horse who doesnt understand what shes telling it, because its a youngster, and as soon as she raises her voice all her horses cower at the back of their stables or cringe in fear...
And used to boast about how she has beaten all the horses down her yard, even horses that are liverys if they even dare step out of line...which sadly included my boys :'(

tbh i dont know half of what i used to when i gave up horses (as like most would i came back :D and now cherish every second) but the things i used to witness makes me glad i finally grew a back bone and left! i dont want my horses subject to that, as she bought them in and turned them out.

now i seem to feel like im full of questions and question everything i do. but nothing a book or google, or forums cant help with! or if nessisary the vet!

but how any one can raise their hand beats me, ill raise my voice slightly (a deeper tone, and show my youngsters what to do) but i will never result in to beating them to do what i want them to! they will get it eventually

:mad:

alas i still feel like the typical brainless livery some times :confused:
 

mandwhy

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You learn by your mistakes, and by example, isn't that what they say?

The lucky ones are those who have people around them they feel they can approach and say "Ummm, bit of advice here please" or "Help!" without being pilloried or made to feel an absolute twit.

Well said! I am always asking questions when I have been sharing or loaning or at riding school etc, and I still feel that when I buy my own I will have to ask loads of things because for example I have never had to order hay, I have never had to be present when the farrier comes, I have never had to really decide for myself what to feed, I have never dealt with lameness and rarely seen any illnesses or injuries! Don't even get me started about showing, I will literally not have a clue what is going on and if I get snotty teenagers laughing at me because daddy didn't buy me a pony when I was 11... well I will probably cry haha!
 

Shantara

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Well said! I am always asking questions when I have been sharing or loaning or at riding school etc, and I still feel that when I buy my own I will have to ask loads of things because for example I have never had to order hay, I have never had to be present when the farrier comes, I have never had to really decide for myself what to feed, I have never dealt with lameness and rarely seen any illnesses or injuries! Don't even get me started about showing, I will literally not have a clue what is going on and if I get snotty teenagers laughing at me because daddy didn't buy me a pony when I was 11... well I will probably cry haha!
I feel like this a lot of the time. I'll be buying my first ever horse soon and honestly, I don't have much of a clue. Thankfully, his current owner will still be around and there will be lots of people to help and I will be loaning him first so I can get used to it.

Sometimes 'clueless' people, are those too scared to ask. Though, sometimes people are simply idiots!
 

evj

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Im always asking too, had ponies but was always supervised by my mam, then a part loan but always checked things with his owner. got my own horse coming home in a week in a half but know that the more experienced people on my yard will keep me right so hopefully not too many mistakes.
 

mandwhy

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It all seems such a minefield of things going wrong and I see so many people come on here with horses who have got sick or injured and I am so worried I won't know what to do, so I am going to have to make it clear to new yard people that I will ask about these things and hope they don't think I'm dumb and shouldn't have a horse!

Can't learn everything from books and internet! Hopefully my share horse owner won't be too peeved about me getting my own horse and will come and help me, otherwise it's just me and my forum buddies!!
 

PonyRiders

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Livery I know said she will be getting rid of one of her horses because the farrier has told her it is going to need front shoes putting on, and she says she can't afford them. so instead she is going to get rid of this horse and get a new one, because, quote "it isn't fair that she should have to pay for front shoes on her own horse, it's to expensive" If she can't afford the shoes then surely she wouldnt be able to pay for a vet in an emergency, and shouldn't have horses!
 

Vodkagirly

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I'm waiting to hear about the livery who tried to trim her horses forelock and left it looking like a five year old had been playing with a girls world....:eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek:
didn't mean to :(
 

Tiasmum

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Well there's nothing wrong with someone being clueless IF they're willing to get help, ask questions, improve and learn. Best type of clueless there is imo ;).

Just because someones owned horses for 50 odd or however many years doesn't automatically mean they're experienced either. Look at me, riding for 15 years - and I'm still crap lol
 

YorksG

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The only time I worry is when clueless owners do things which put the horse at risk and then refuse to take advice. The classic for me is the woman who allowed the fly mask on her mare to rub the mare raw. She then bandaged the nose, tied tightly round the lower jaw :eek: She did accept advice to remove the bandage, but then put an elasterplast on the wound. This woman knew nothing and did not want to hear any advice, she was a livery on a yard with a friend of mine and used to drive said friend crackers!
 

FionaM12

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I was a horse-owner from 1972 to 1978 ish, then had a long horse free gap :( until last year when I bought Mollie.

One of the huge changes between then and now, is the internet. When you had a numpty question back then, you looked it up in the few books you had, asked people you knew, and that was it. Now, you have the internet: no end of advice, some good, some bad, but with a bit of common sense and sifting through, you can find the answers you need. :)

Twice now when I've mentioned to other liveries that I use the internet to "read up" about horse issues and problems, I've been solemnly told this isn't a good idea. :confused:
 

rhino

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Twice now when I've mentioned to other liveries that I use the internet to "read up" about horse issues and problems, I've been solemnly told this isn't a good idea. :confused:
I think when you read a book though, you have a fair idea that the author must have some knowledge and understanding of the subject, although for many subjects, as soon as it is 'in print' it is 'out of date' :rolleyes: :D

On places like this you generally have no idea of the level of knowledge or experience of the posters.

Every day there is potentially dangerous advice given on here, and sometimes it scares me :eek: :eek: There is a lot of pseudo science, bad science and non science (nonsense :D) bandied about as 'fact'; either with purely anecdotal 'evidence' or with links given to deeply flawed research :( I know that some posters have accepted it as true, with negative effects on them and/or their horses.

A healthy dose of common sense on here is vital, and a willingness to go away and do a bit of research for yourself, even if it is asking the professionals what their opinion is. I don't believe vets and farriers get it right every time, but I do think they get it right more often than the average horse owner, especially when all they have got to go on is a few lines of a post :)

Plus when 'googling' symptoms of an injury or disease you tend to get the worst possible diagnoses :eek: :eek:
 
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FionaM12

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I think when you read a book though, you have a fair idea that the author must have some knowledge and understanding of the subject, although for many subjects, as soon as it is 'in print' it is 'out of date' :rolleyes: :D

On places like this you generally have no idea of the level of knowledge or experience of what they are 'proclaiming'

Every day there is potentially dangerous advice given on here, and sometimes it scares me :eek: :eek: There is a lot of pseudo science, bad science and non science (nonsense :D) bandied about as 'fact'; either with purely anecdotal 'evidence' or with links given to deeply flawed research :( I know that posters have accepted it as true, with negative effects on them and/or their horses.

A healthy dose of common sense on here is vital, and a willingness to go away and do a bit of research for yourself, even if it is asking the professionals what their opinion is. I don't believe vets and farriers get it right every time, but I do think they get it right more often than the average horse owner, especially when all they have got to go on is a few lines of a post :)

Plus when 'googling' symptoms of an injury or disease you tend to get the worst possible diagnoses :eek: :eek:
That's why I say you need to use common sense. I don't just this forum (useful as I've found it :)), I've searched many sites to find what I need. The problem I was refering to to the other liveries was Mollie's head-shaking. I've bought numerous books on horse care in the past year but not one is specialised enough to help on this subject.

Asking people (in "real life") about head-shaking also hasn't been useful. Even very experienced horsey people haven't had anything helpful to tell me. :(

However, there are various sites and veterinary articles to be found online. By reading these, following advice found there and experimenting with Mollie, I'm very hopeful we're making good progress. I believe I now have a reasonable understanding of why she head-shakes (that it's neurological pain-related and involuntary, rather than naughtiness as people tried to tell me :rolleyes:). I bought her a bitless bridle and a nose net. Further tweaking (adjusting the shape and fit of the net with some inventive stitching :D and removing the browband from the bridle) means that now, two weeks after the start of the head-shaking season :rolleyes: she's actually stopped.

I don't believe I'd have got this far without the internet. Yes, just indiscriminatingly following advice online can be dangerous, but with a bit of sense, it's a godsend.
 

rhino

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However, there are various sites and veterinary articles to be found online. By reading these, following advice found there and experimenting with Mollie, I'm very hopeful we're making good progress. I believe I now have a reasonable understanding of why she head-shakes (that it's neurological pain-related and involuntary, rather than naughtiness as people tried to tell me :rolleyes:). I bought her a bitless bridle and a nose net. Further tweaking (adjusting the shape and fit of the net with some inventive stitching :D and removing the browband from the bridle) means that now, two weeks after the start of the head-shaking season :rolleyes: she's actually stopped.
Brilliant :D Which nose net are you using, out of interest? :)
 

FionaM12

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Brilliant :D Which nose net are you using, out of interest? :)
Erm... I bought it last year, I'll look it up in my records tomorrow and let you know! :D It was cheap on ebay. :rolleyes:

I bought the bitless last summer, but it took so long to arrive the head-shaking had nearly stopped (she does it April-Aug). I also got my money back as a apology for the time delivery took, btw. :) I'd bought the nose net but it was loose and seemed to annoy her, flapping about.

That was as far as I got by last August.

Then two weeks ago, she started again, worse than ever. She was really, really, distressed by it and I ended up in tears. I only had to put her (normal, bitted) bridle on and she started, even though she'd been fine all winter. :(

So, I dug out the bitless, made the adjustments described earlier and tried again. The nose net now has reinforcement across her nostrils (old tights!) elastic and tapes tied under her chin to stop it flapping. My daughter says she looks like a moose. :D

However, she's a happy moose! She'd barely trot when I was on her a few days earlier, the head-shake was so violent. With the moose mask, she pricks her ears and trots briskly forward once she's stopped pulling faces under the elastic! :D

And I'm a pretty happy moose myself. :eek::D
 

LaurenBay

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We have a livery at my yard. He got a Horse because his OH at the time had them and he wanted to have a common interest. They break up, get kicked off yard and end up at my yard. When we went to pick him up, he had boots on back to front and when at the trailer, he dropped the leadrope and tried to push the Horse up the ramp. He did look relieved when YO took over the loading. The other day, Horse tied up, eating hay of the haynet on the floor. Owner knowhere to be seen. I removed net and found the owner, I explained why I removed the net and what couldv'e happend etc. He has tried to ride once as he was bringing Horse in from feild. No saddle, no bridle, no hat, Horse not sat on in 7 months, owner not sat on a Horse ever. I got there just in time to see him falling headfirst onto the concrete yard. Thankfully he was ok. When his Horse had a swollen leg, rather then stand there and hose, he tied the Hose to the Horses leg with bailer twine then left him and left him whilst he got on with jobs. He ia lucky his Horse is a saint! He really does care for the Horse though and does listen to us. Though sometimes we have to tell him more then once.
 
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