Coat of tie-back op?

spacie1977

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Hi there,
I’m considering going to view a horse that might need a tie-back op in the future. Obviously it’s been priced to sell knowing the purchaser may need to pay for the op in the future, so I’m wondering how much I’d be looking at having to cough up for it.
Has anyone here recently had it done? If so, how much is it to do, and what is the expected long term outcome for it?
 

ihatework

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You are probably talking, 2K give or take, depending who does it.

Has the horse had an overground scope? If less mild wind issue you might get away with a standing laser hobday, much much cheaper
 

ester

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I'd make significant enquiries, the only hobdayed horse I know has significant chronic lung damage due to small but regular aspiration of food, and after a major episode ended up with penumonia and hospitalised for a couple of weeks. IIRC the vets said that can happen post hobday. I'm sure plenty are fine and obviously this is just a sample of 1 but it was the first time it became apparent to me that it might not be totally innocuos/risk free.
 

conniegirl

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also bare in mind that some societies wont let you compete if the horse has had a wind operation (notably some of the showing societies) so check the rule books of any affiliated society you want to compete under before purchase
 

ycbm

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I had one done at seven for £2500 and he was totally trouble free until he died of something unrelated at ten. I would recommend it, a horse who can't breathe enough to run away from a lion, and knows it, is not a happy horse. Mine was altogether a more relaxed animal once it was done. I would expect to pay £3k if it was done now.
 

conniegirl

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tally trouble free until he died of something unrelated at ten. I would recommend it, a horse who can't breathe enough to run away from a lion, and knows it, is not a happy horse. Mine was altogether a more relaxed animal once it was done. I would expect to pay £3k if it was done now.
but why buy trouble in the first place?
 

spacie1977

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Thank you for the replies. Hmm... think I might steer clear of this horse then. As you say, why buy troubles. Considering the potential cost of an op and he’s still green, I think they’re asking for more than he’s worth at the moment. And insurance wouldn’t cover an as the vetting will pick up on his wind noises. Shame as he looks lovely.
 

ester

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Well yes if I had one I would do it. That doesn't mean you buy one though.

Fwiw the horse I know presumably had it done when in pre-training (he didn't race), he was 15 when he was ill.
 

ycbm

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but why buy trouble in the first place?

To get a better horse than you have the budget for.

Most horses with a tie back will never have an issue, and you also know that it will never need a tie back, which a very large proportion of horses over 16.2 will do at some point in their lives.

Having experienced one close up, a tie back is definitely a risk I would personally take to get a better horse than my budget.
 
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