cobs

hunteress

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My cob who is a little gem can be rather stubborn sometimes like if I get him in from the field he won't walk on and stands firm the last couple of times getting him on his trailer which he normally walkes straight on like a little lamb he refused twice this week back, teeth everything have been checked hound ex at the moment and he is looking good do your cobby's have this streak its a true saying he's got a cob on !! what do you lot do if the stubborn streak hits, thanks. he's 8 and very well mannered.(sometimes!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!)
 

hellybelly6

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He sounds like he is trying it on. He is napping when you get in him from the field because he is leaving his friends and grass. Do you get him in even when you are not riding him?

Its obviously not natural for a horse to get into the enclosed space of a trailer, but as he has previously been ok, I think he is being stubborn. Is there a nice juicy haynet waiting for him at the front of the trailer/feed bucket with a treat or two?

I expect your cob is quite a dominant soul and he may be asserting his dominance over you.

If he refuses to get onto the trailer, make him stand in front of it, not moving at all, he will soon get bored and go in. Dont get frustrated, he will pick up on this and use it to his advantage.

I also feel it would be good to do some work in hand with him, getting him to move over, go back etc.

I had similar problems with my dominant horse and in hand work worked a treat.
 

Kenzo

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Cobs are actually little clever individuals, dont let there soft and dosey look on their faces fool you, they also use their weight and strength to their advantage...given the chance to find out.

Food is the way to cobs heart...if he's being an awkward little buggar, feed him his bucket feed in his trailer every evening, no going in trailer....no yummy bucket feed!

They soon work it out and will do anything for an easier life, before you know it, your cob will be dragging you every trailer he sees!
grin.gif


thats just in relation to loading, of course ground work as above is the important thing, but above does work...honest!
 

Box_Of_Frogs

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Hunteress - yup! That sounds like a cob! What I would say is don't let it get any worse coz one day he will be stubborn and plant his feet being brought in and the next day he'll be refusing to do anything he doesn't want to do and maybe even being quite determined about it eg rearing, barging, trampling etc. If he won't walk in from the field you need to do some work on respect and handling issues but I'd start off by taking a crop or schooling whip into the field and the very first time he planted his feet and said NO, I'd give him a single sharp smack on his bum and say YES. He'll probably leap forward in horror so be prepared. He probably won't ever need more than that. My friend bought a gorgeous 8 yr old gipsy cob gelding. 15.2 and built like the proverbial. He very soon started to refuse to come in, then he refused to be caught, then he started to rear and then he was dangerous. She lost all confidence in him and has now sold him on to a guy who sorted it all out in a day or so and the horse is much, much happier for knowing who is in charge!
 

Theresa_F

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Not everyone will agree with this but it works very well for me - classic carrot and stick approach. Purchase a dog choke chain and thread it under his jaw and attach the rings to a lead rope. Carry a long schooling whip. If he pulls back the chain tightens and is uncomfortable - his choice.

If he plants give him a voice command along with a little tug on the chain and a tap with the whip where you would when riding. Increase pressure on chain and the tap until he realises life is far nicer to keep with you. Mine did take one fairly hard tug and a slap the one time before he worked it out.

Unless he is a nippy sort, immediately reward with a small treat - bit of carrot or minty cube him going forward or loading.

My young gypsy cob did exactly the same at the age of 3, he is now 4, and I still always keep the chain in my pocket and the whip nearby when loading but have used it once in the last 8 outings, and then only had to put it on not actually come into play - he gets one chance to get onboard, then the chain is threaded and the whip is held - that is normally enough to have him straight on.

Cobs are very intelligent and can really take the mick until it is made 100% clear that the consquences for them are uncomfortable, but behaving is nice. I often put the chain on for ground work, if I think there is any chance of him piddlying about - stops it before it happens.
 

hunteress

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Thanks for your great replys I will try what you have suggested I am calm with him as if I shout or get ratty with him he just sticks to the floor and then when I wait at the trailer he will suddenly walk straight on so I think i know he taking the P--s and now 8 he's just testing me and being cheeky school boy !!!
 

Box_Of_Frogs

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You're absolutely right Theresa F. Cobs ARE intelligent. Some people think they are just lazy, boring plods but they aren't! It's just that they use their brains to find ever more interesting ways to get OUT of work! Engage my boy's brain in the school and he goes like a dream!
 
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