Colic any advice

NooNoo59

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I have a 5 and half year old welsh section d had him for about a year and a half. About a month ago he had colic symptoms had the vet out and after buscopan vet said he had undigested matter so no food overnight and he was as right as rain. It has occurred again tonight vet didn’t come out but gave him Danilon and no food overnight. He had his first outing on spring grass today so maybe that was the reason for today but he was fine last year. No idea what caused it month before. Vet wants him to stay on shavings have wet hay and food and no sudden changes of routine. Any idea why this is happened all of a sudden anyone experienced anything similar.?
 

Shilasdair

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Horses' digestive tracts are badly designed in terms of the shape of the tubes carrying the matter from mouth to anus. They are also reliant on bacterial action to help them break down cellulose.
I'd put money on it being caused by the spring grass - and if I were you, I'd listen to the vet regarding sudden changes. Either limit the area of grass he has access to (electric fence) or the time he has out. Might also be worth giving him probiotics - although no one's ever proved they help with colic.
One thing found to reduce colic incidence is access to a salt lick - a nice easy thing to do.
 

PurBee

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Mouldy or musty hay causes mycotoxicosis which can lead to colic in some, depending on the amount of spores ingested.
Certain toxic weeds in hay you havent noticed..?...trees overhanging he’s had access to? Like holly, oak....horses love to eat tree buds before leaves open....some can be toxic.

Mine both ate rapeseed bedding i was trialling, colic and mild laminitis followed. Rapeseed is often sprayed with a certain herbicide...forget what its called, but when i researched it its toxic to ingest.
Does your horse eat the bedding?

Maybe rats/mice have been living in your hay supply and tainting it with their urine, causing bowel infection symptoms?

Maybe he’s been knawing at woodwork in his stable/yard that has wood preservative in it?

My horses started de-barking branches from a noble fir tree once and got mild colicy symptoms.
At springtime they seem to gravitate to de-barking trees to be able to lick up the rising sap within the tree. I dont blame them, its very delicious with a mild sweet taste.....but in the process they ingest bark and depending on tree species, some bark is toxic for them.
I allow mine to have willow.

There’s many reasons for colic but i’d look at food supply for mould musty smelling feed first, bedding, then toxic plants as main culprit.
 

molar roller

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there are many reasons that can lead to this. Inflammation or high pressure in intestine, bacterial problems, cribbing, eating objects...(more reasons for racers)
I think a vet should listen intestine then recognises which part of intestine has a problem. even may use a probe, them your vet can give you an idea.
 

Griffin

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I would second probiotics, although there is not necessarily evidence, anything that helps the gut work properly will help.

I add salt to my horse's feed because she is not a fan of salt licks (they look pretty hanging up though). I use Simple Systems Summer Salt but basically any salt will do (just be aware table salt has anti-caking agents in it).

Is your horse stables for long periods not time at all? I only ask because activity helps to keep the guts moving, so if you can keep him outside for longer (reducing access to spring grass, which I know is tricky), you may help him move things along. In his stable, you could try two hay nets on opposite sides so he has to move about more. This is also helpful for preventing ulcers, so possibly a double win.
 

Green Bean

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Keyflow Pink Mash is good for the hindgut and already contains Protexin. I swear by it. Another interesting factor, is does your horse have free access to good quality water while out in the paddock all day? If not, this can cause dehydration which hardens everything up inside. May not be any of these things though, only you will know all the factors including history any little thing that may have changed in your routine
 

canteron

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Don’t know if this helps but after a couple of colicky bouts for my box rest horse my vet suggested no chaff but a handful if bran instead. I now soak a couple of handful of grass nuts with a handful of bran with salt, into almost a soup consistency, and have had no further episodes. Has been suggested some vegetable oil might help as well.
 

PurBee

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There’s also a chance spring colic episodes could be caused by emerging small redworms in the interstines. when the weather warms up these blighters come alive and emerge from their hiding cysts within the lining of the bowel.
Moxidectin or albendazole wormer is needed late winter preferably to kill them.
 

NooNoo59

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There’s also a chance spring colic episodes could be caused by emerging small redworms in the interstines. when the weather warms up these blighters come alive and emerge from their hiding cysts within the lining of the bowel.
Moxidectin or albendazole wormer is needed late winter preferably to kill them.
Wormer done in November for red worm
 

NooNoo59

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Don’t know if this helps but after a couple of colicky bouts for my box rest horse my vet suggested no chaff but a handful if bran instead. I now soak a couple of handful of grass nuts with a handful of bran with salt, into almost a soup consistency, and have had no further episodes. Has been suggested some vegetable oil might help as well.
Well he is only having chaff with his supplement thinking I might swap to fast fibre as although I wet the chaff its prob not the same
 

canteron

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Well he is only having chaff with his supplement thinking I might swap to fast fibre as although I wet the chaff its prob not the same
I know there is lots of different schools of thought on feeding but my vet was adamant that I don’t feed chaff if any chance of colic and to be fair since I changed there has been no further signs. I use Thunderbook meadow grass nuts - expensive but last forever and horse loves them.
 

Red-1

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I would limit the time on spring grass if you changed fields. Start with an hour am and pm in the new field, even less if he has already shown colic signs, the rest of the time in the old one.
 

NooNoo59

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I know there is lots of different schools of thought on feeding but my vet was adamant that I don’t feed chaff if any chance of colic and to be fair since I changed there has been no further signs. I use Thunderbook meadow grass nuts - expensive but last forever and horse loves them.
How long was he on the chaff before you changed. My boy has been having this for a year
 

canteron

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I think the change for me was when she was on box rest and not moving so much - I am honestly sure it isn’t the chaff in your case, but my very pragmatic unemotional vet was adamant it’s relatively hard to digest so just worth putting that information in the pot!!
 
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