Continuing riding.

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3 August 2017
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17
Hi, looking for some advice.

December last year I gave my horse to a charity as she was ill and required a very expensive operation which I could not afford, and I was/still am very much heartbroken. I took a break from riding until February this year as I was feeling discouraged from riding and just wanted some time off. I had a couple of lessons this month however the riding schools in my area are not ideal as some are quite far (I don't have transport) and I have not had good experiences with them. I'm keeping an eye out for horses to loan but none are appearing to be suitable. I'm at a loss of what to do as I really want to carry on riding and I'm worried that the longer break I take, the less I will remember when I ride again. I'm looking to buy a horse again possibly later this year (Oct/Nov time) when my mum buys a car but I'm worried I will have forgotten everything by then and I will not be a good enough ridero_O
 

Shay

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17 August 2008
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You gave a horse to a charity because you couldn't afford vets bills?

Is this a half term post?

Buying horses incurs vets bills. If you can't afford to treat one horse absolutely don't buy - or loan - another! Charities are not there to taken on your hosres just becuase you can't afford the bills. No matter how heartbroken you are.
 
Joined
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You gave a horse to a charity because you couldn't afford vets bills?

Is this a half term post?

Buying horses incurs vets bills. If you can't afford to treat one horse absolutely don't buy - or loan - another! Charities are not there to taken on your hosres just becuase you can't afford the bills. No matter how heartbroken you are.
It was an unexpected condition that had worsened. I was paying for her vet bills however her condition got worse and it was either putting her to sleep or paying for an overly expensive operation which my insurance company could not cover. I asked for advice on how to continue with my riding, not to be criticised. There was more to the story. Also the charity were more than happy to take her in and give her the treatment she needs and to live out the rest of her life:)
 

Shay

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Sorry - should have looked at the previous posts.

In December '17 - contemplating buying a first horse and had been riding 2 years...

Jan '18 - a part loan has come to an end with the Riding school moving horse to another loaner but you couldn't understand why. At the time you were thought to be 12/13?

Then by August '18 you had been loaning 4 years and you had just bought an OTTB TB which wasn't actually off the track but had been in foal twice then turned away for 2 years. You were not able to ride her, couldn't lunge her and thought it was just excitement You were advised to re-back. Presumably this was the mare then given away to a charity.

I absolutely do feel for the desperate sense of urgency of the young person. If you can't do it now you'll "never" be able to. There are horses available for very little cash up front. But they take time, commitment and - most importantly - money to care for. A horse which is free or very cheap will not end up free. As you have discovered.

You don't forget how to ride - its like riding a bicycle. But you also never stop learning. I don't know what you want to do when you grow up but if it is horse related you might be better off putting your energies into gaining experience and qualifications.
 

JFTD-WS

Wears headscarf humorously...
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Are you a minor? I ask because of what you say about your mum and the car - and it will affect the responses.
 
Joined
3 August 2017
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17
Sorry - should have looked at the previous posts.

In December '17 - contemplating buying a first horse and had been riding 2 years...

Jan '18 - a part loan has come to an end with the Riding school moving horse to another loaner but you couldn't understand why. At the time you were thought to be 12/13?

Then by August '18 you had been loaning 4 years and you had just bought an OTTB TB which wasn't actually off the track but had been in foal twice then turned away for 2 years. You were not able to ride her, couldn't lunge her and thought it was just excitement You were advised to re-back. Presumably this was the mare then given away to a charity.

I absolutely do feel for the desperate sense of urgency of the young person. If you can't do it now you'll "never" be able to. There are horses available for very little cash up front. But they take time, commitment and - most importantly - money to care for. A horse which is free or very cheap will not end up free. As you have discovered.

You don't forget how to ride - its like riding a bicycle. But you also never stop learning. I don't know what you want to do when you grow up but if it is horse related you might be better off putting your energies into gaining experience and qualifications.
Yes it's the mare in the previous post, the vet found she had an untreatable condition from tearing when having her foals, and the only option was euthanasia or the operation.
I've definitely learned a lot after buying an OTTB which is why I'd like to try again with another horse later this year when my circumstances change. Could you clarify on what you mean by I'll "Never be able to"? I feel like I'm ready to commit to buying another one however I'm not in the best position to do so at the moment.
 

JFTD-WS

Wears headscarf humorously...
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Honestly... Ride at a school when you can for the next year or so, then go out and get yourself an apprenticeship at a yard where you can learn and ride and get some qualifications - and re-consider buying when you're in a better position to manage it. That's if you're serious about horses in that sense. Alternatively, if you're looking at a more academic / non-horsey career, look for some weekend work with horses, or a part loan - you'll be off to university or starting out in entry level jobs very soon, and having your own horse will make that much more difficult.
 

Ambers Echo

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13 October 2017
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I would not buy unless your parents are willing help - at 16 you can't afford the unexpected bills. Horses are very, very expensive when things go wrong. But if you are reliable & trustworthy, you might well be able to find a loan/part loan/share. In the meantime, help out at riding schools etc to gain experience. Good luck x
 

ihatework

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7 September 2004
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I would strongly advise you not to even consider buying for the foreseeable. You sound nowhere near experienced enough or sufficiently supported financially to be able to do this.

That doesn’t mean giving up horses however.

If you want this enough there is nothing stopping you getting a bike and advertising yourself for weekend work. Conduct yourself well and hopefully someone will provide you with some riding too.
 

HEM

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I agree with the other posters. In a few years when your exams are done and you are earning you will be in a much better position to own.

I did the same thing at your age and took time off completely (because of exams and I need to fall in love with the sport again) now at 22 after working full time in an office for about 2 years and riding at a riding school for 6 months I only now feel I may possibly be ready to own again some time soon.
 

Shay

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17 August 2008
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Could you clarify on what you mean by I'll "Never be able to"? I feel like I'm ready to commit to buying another one however I'm not in the best position to do so at the moment.
You misread my grammar. I didn't mean you would never be able to own the horse. I meant that I udnerstand it feels like that when you are young - that you need to do things now. You've had some really good solid advice. Get your exams under your belt and look to gain wider experience and some horsey qualifications if that is what you want to do with your life. Volunteer at a local RDA or riding school to gain experience and don't look to owning again until you are financially independent.
 
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26 December 2018
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You have probably already looked into it, but if not, are you open to part loaning a horse? I was very surprised at the sheer number of horses for part loan as opposed to full loan (in my area, at least). Or, some riding schools have a loaning system in place for their horses.

In regards to the "forgetting how to ride", I am 23 and recently returned to riding after a 4/5 year break and was surprised how much I remembered! I jumped straight into a part loan, having only ever done lessons/own-a-pony days previously and it's working out perfectly! Aside from being a little stiff getting on, it was like I never stopped! If you do take a break, don't stress about it at all! :)
 
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4 January 2016
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238
You most certainly won't forget. I was 13/14 when I lost mine and stopped. I just couldn't do it and lost the joy. 16 years later I made a new years resolution to see if I still loved it and 4 years after, I am re-training a green Arab mare for dressage and just starting to jump again. I am financially able to support vet bills, and have a very loving other half happy to help with the unexpected bill that I can't stretch to the whole way

When I was younger, I had the full financial support of my parents, and spent a lot of my life helping at my riding school learning the care myself and doing the Progressive Riding Tests (1-4 before I stopped) so could look after my own myself as my parents had no clue about horses. Now I am back and doing my BHS exams in the hope of becoming a freelance instructor

So...If you need to take a break that's not going to be a bad thing. I am so much more thankful for what I have now and I am pretty sure the break just made me love it more
 

HeyMich

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I had a break of over 20 years, as I wasn't in a financial position to own a horse and pay for all eventualities! I was a wee bitty rusty getting back to it again, but hadn't forgotten any of the basics.

Give it time, and get experience from every opportunity you can. Then, when you can afford to buy, you'll be a better horse-owner for having had the extra experiences.
 
Joined
13 February 2019
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2
Hi.
I have been reading many stories about how many of you had to quit riding due to many reasons, but the most common was the financial situation. That made me understand that I was not the only one, whose parents could no longer afford it.
This is my story.
I started riding at the age of ten at my hometown local stables. It had just a few simple school horses (of course, every horse is special in a certain way) and a huge number of kids, who wanted to ride just like me. On my first day, when my parents took me to the stables, the instructor had put me on very beautiful brown mixed blood mare with a white star on her head, named Prairie. The moment a got on in the saddle, I understood that she is special for me and fell in love with her instantly. She became my most beloved horse. For the next couple of months, I was taught how to trot and control properly the horse, but as there were so many students and only a few horses, I only was getting about 15-20 minutes on the horse per entire lesson. The instructor focused mostly on more experienced students. Only attending summer riding classes for much much higher price (for which my mother got into debt) I was able to learn how to canter and even make some jumps (for this I will be always grateful to my mother). Later on, I received an opportunity to join the advance group, I switched places with a totally green rider. In that, advance group, I face true hardships, being the only 12 years old among all 17-18-year-old experienced riders with well-off parents. The new instructor women was a genuine army torture robot, who would punish you for all your mistakes my hitting your horse with the whip, make you run countless laps and even make you do push-ups on snow in the arena (in order to make you physically strong to control these huge animals). I was constantly bullied, but I did not quite and after some time, I started getting better, normally trotting and cantering without stirrups and even jumping over 1 meter high obstacles. Only having 2 lessons per week. But when the time for participating in the shows came, the entry fees, tack, show clothing were too expensive for my family, also I hit my back pretty badly. On the top of that my beloved mare Prairie was sold and all that led to quitting riding. Of course, on certain occasions, I would get on a horse and ride for my pleasure. But this was not, how dreamed of. I wanted to become a professional rider, to compete and even train children, but life is life. At the age of sixteen, I started to work part-time, earn my own money and become independent. After starting college part-time and working, I met with my current boyfriend, he understood my passion for the equestrian sport and even started going with me riding on some occasions. Now, I'm twenty-two, living with my boyfriend, working a boring office job at his father company and earning a good wage. Helping my mother financially often, even started taking lessons at a local stable once per week in Oslo, Norway (his father's company is situated in Norway, but we are from the Baltic country ). The lessons are very expensive and during them, we only do common dressage, but they do no let me, as the jumping course cost twice as much as the simple lessons. But at least my can be around horses. My boyfriend is semi-supportive towards my riding lessons, he does not mind, but always mentions that it is very expensive because we are in Norway to earn more money and save up. But I cannot stop, would save up more for food and other necessities like free time activities and etc; and book a riding lesson instead. But as far as I see, I'm not improving, for many lessons are the same mistakes: cannot keep the horse on the bit, losing stirrups and leaning too much in front. Maybe I am too old, or just not enough time in the saddle. Often thinking of stopping booking lessons, but there something inside just keep pushing me towards the stables. Not losing the hope to own my own horse and finally to compete. But I also dream of having a child and even a career. the controversy of this horse crazy girl and adult career women are fighting inside of me. Well, you cannot know, what the future holds for us and maybe, my dream will come true..
Thank for letting me share my story with you.
If anybody feels the same as me, please write, I would like to hear from the others. :)
 
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