Does anyone use a training band system - PAP?

SEL

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When I have the emotional energy I will do a post on here at some point about what's happened but I have basically been told I don't have any comeback.

I'm so upset by everything and so sad I still haven't got anything to ride after so long already sat on the side lines watching others have fun, not that I resented having to do it for Bailey as he owed me nothing. But that's horses for you I guess but its a bitter pill to swallow all the same.
I know how I felt when the pony I took on as a quick project while the Appy was off (now retired) turned out to have a serious medical issue. I did wonder what I'd done to deserve yet another problem while everyone else was out having fun - I was already exhausted and it made me very miserable. I really feel for you and hope that rehab is successful.
 

Birker2020

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I know how I felt when the pony I took on as a quick project while the Appy was off (now retired) turned out to have a serious medical issue. I did wonder what I'd done to deserve yet another problem while everyone else was out having fun - I was already exhausted and it made me very miserable. I really feel for you and hope that rehab is successful.
Thank you. Its the disappointment more than anything and the fact that I got so taken in. I can look back now and see how it all rolled out.

The YO says it was because I was sad and I was desperate. But it was weird because I'd actually got to the point where the YO was no longer holding my stable with her horse in there which she'd been really kind enough to do, and I was having to start paying for it to be held for me. At that point I felt I could relax a bit more and not rush, so I'd actually felt less desperate by that point, although at no point had she ever made me felt pressurised, that was just in my head.

I just have to try and make the best of a sad situation but I will freely admit I am really struggling and feel very depressed.
 

Tiddlypom

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I'm so sorry to hear that its not going smoothly with Lari. He's a lovely type. I hope that he does come good for you.

Is there not any comeback with the vet who did the 5 stage vetting on him? IIRC Lari passed his vetting with flying colours, which is suspicious considering all that it has subsequently transpired is wrong with him.

We pay these professionals to pick up on issues that we amateurs might miss. Though my last two purchases also sailed through their 5 stage vettings, one by a vet from a top referral practice often praised on HHO, and very soon both proved to have lots of issues :rolleyes:...
 

I'm Dun

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I'm so sorry to hear that its not going smoothly with Lari. He's a lovely type. I hope that he does come good for you.

Is there not any comeback with the vet who did the 5 stage vetting on him? IIRC Lari passed his vetting with flying colours, which is suspicious considering all that it has subsequently transpired is wrong with him.

We pay these professionals to pick up on issues that we amateurs might miss. Though my last two purchases also sailed through their 5 stage vettings, one by a vet from a top referral practice often praised on HHO, and very soon both proved to have lots of issues :rolleyes:...
I was about to say the same. You took a physio to see him didnt you? And had a good vet do the vetting, so surely theres some come back if hes not right.
 

flying_high

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I was about to say the same. You took a physio to see him didnt you? And had a good vet do the vetting, so surely theres some come back if hes not right.
Birker has made it pretty clear she doesn’t want speculation about him.

A 5 stage vetting is only a view on the day, as is a physio assessment.

Lots of issue improve short term with rest and body work enough to pass a vetting and reappear when horse is in regular work.

Or just don’t show up on the day of the vetting.
 

flying_high

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If you then add in the ones that are kept at bay by daily challenging work but appear when a horse is ridden less often, it's a flipping minefield buying a horse!
.
Very true, or the ones whose riders have learnt (not always consciously) what work regime / management regime / bodywork regime keeps horse sound, and then when sold, new rider, unwittingly changes most of these and horse doesnt cope.

My vet commented that buying an older, established horse, can be like buying a stack of lined dominos when you change one thing the whole systems starts to collapse.
 

flying_high

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If you then add in the ones that are kept at bay by daily challenging work but appear when a horse is ridden less often, it's a flipping minefield buying a horse!
.
Or the flip side I bought a genuine low mileage competition 11 year old horse early this year, that passed a 5 stage vetting, with a senior vet I know well.

I know both the original seller, and the yard he was sold from. All are genuine.

5 months after buying him (without x-rays) a bone chip shows up in one hock. X-rays reveal negative plantar angles in his hind feet, and two more bone chips.

Likely bone chips are from before he was three, but as he’s never been in hard work were never an issue.

He was only ridden 3 times a week, fairly lightly most of his adult life. I tend to ride 6-7 time a week, with hills, decent long hacks, galloping, poles, schooling, competing, lots of turnout etc.
He’s a completely different shape to when I bought him.

Bone chip removal via keyhole surgery in August, and he’s back in full work now. His feet angles are back in the normal range.

The moral of the story, is perhaps only buy an older horse, if already doing what you want to do that is sound and happy with the level of work you want to do. But in fact I wouldn’t change him for anything.
 

onemoretime

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Birker has made it pretty clear she doesn’t want speculation about him.

A 5 stage vetting is only a view on the day, as is a physio assessment.

Lots of issue improve short term with rest and body work enough to pass a vetting and reappear when horse is in regular work.

Or just don’t show up on the day of the vetting.
Or hidden by a load of bute as was my case when I bought a horse from a well known dealer in Scotland. Also given 6 bags of chaff and nuts all laced with bute. Horse had passed a 5 stage vetting, blood run proved the bute! Dealer was a Vice Chairman of the BHS and a Welfare Officer for them!! You cant trust anyone when buying a horse sadly.

Please dont blame yourself Birker its not your fault, I know a lot of very experienced people who have been caught out. I do sincerely hope that you can get your boy sorted out and be able to go out and have fun on him.
 

AdorableAlice

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Very true, or the ones whose riders have learnt (not always consciously) what work regime / management regime / bodywork regime keeps horse sound, and then when sold, new rider, unwittingly changes most of these and horse doesnt cope.

My vet commented that buying an older, established horse, can be like buying a stack of lined dominos when you change one thing the whole systems starts to collapse.
I agree with this, I have only bought one established horse, he was 11. The wheels fell off mentally for him rather than physically when he came to me. The first 12 months of ownership were fraught but he went on to be the best horse I have ever had.
 

onemoretime

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Or the flip side I bought a genuine low mileage competition 11 year old horse early this year, that passed a 5 stage vetting, with a senior vet I know well.

I know both the original seller, and the yard he was sold from. All are genuine.

5 months after buying him (without x-rays) a bone chip shows up in one hock. X-rays reveal negative plantar angles in his hind feet, and two more bone chips.

Likely bone chips are from before he was three, but as he’s never been in hard work were never an issue.

He was only ridden 3 times a week, fairly lightly most of his adult life. I tend to ride 6-7 time a week, with hills, decent long hacks, galloping, poles, schooling, competing, lots of turnout etc.
He’s a completely different shape to when I bought him.

Bone chip removal via keyhole surgery in August, and he’s back in full work now. His feet angles are back in the normal range.

The moral of the story, is perhaps only buy an older horse, if already doing what you want to do that is sound and happy with the level of work you want to do. But in fact I wouldn’t change him for anything.
Very glad to hear your managed to sort your boy out and get him right.
 

paddy555

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Or hidden by a load of bute as was my case when I bought a horse from a well known dealer in Scotland. Also given 6 bags of chaff and nuts all laced with bute. Horse had passed a 5 stage vetting, blood run proved the bute! Dealer was a Vice Chairman of the BHS and a Welfare Officer for them!! You cant trust anyone when buying a horse sadly.
just as a matter of interest did you take action and bring this to the notice of BHS and other welfare organisations if you had the proof.
 

Goldenstar

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A change of home is just the moment where issues like these rear their ugly heads .
Change of rider , change of routine of work of turnout even size of stable are changes that can profoundly effect this type of horse .
One thing for sure I would be speaking to the my vet the vet who did the vetting and getting the bloods from the vetting screened .
For horses the age of This one if you can get a look of the medical history is invaluable but not fool proof as it’s easy enough to gets needles stuck in by another vet .
 

onemoretime

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just as a matter of interest did you take action and bring this to the notice of BHS and other welfare organisations if you had the proof.
Yes I did. I sent them the Confidentiality Agreement (not drawn up correctly so not worth the paper its written on) and also the positive blood test and eventually after a considerable amount of time, she is no longer with the BHS.
 

onemoretime

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The whole damn business was extremely stressful for us. It was such a shock to realise what she had done and upon speaking to other people who have had very similar situations I realised this is what she does. The only thing I found strange was I was the only person to realise that the bags of feed handed out were drugged, everyone else had fed them and forgotten them. I had only fed 4 bags and left 2 on the lorry the night we bought him home. When I realised what had gone on I had them tested and they were of course positive!
 

bonny

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The whole damn business was extremely stressful for us. It was such a shock to realise what she had done and upon speaking to other people who have had very similar situations I realised this is what she does. The only thing I found strange was I was the only person to realise that the bags of feed handed out were drugged, everyone else had fed them and forgotten them. I had only fed 4 bags and left 2 on the lorry the night we bought him home. When I realised what had gone on I had them tested and they were of course positive!
Were the bags all open ?
 

bouncing_ball

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And yet you go on to post several more times speculating about it...
No I didn’t.

I was talking about how doing all the right things as a buyer snd having a good 5 stage vetting doesn’t always result in a sound horse in a new home.

None of that was speculation about her situation.
 
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