Dog chased by other dogs and bolted

Odyssey

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27 February 2018
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Next time, simply turn and walk in the opposite direction. No fuss, no hurry, no stress and absolutely ignore the other dog (unless it’s at stick length), at which point you give it a poke.
Unfortunately that may well not be enough. I turned round and quickly walked in the opposite direction, after I saw a dog near the entrance to the field where we were walking, snarling and straining at the lead. Once in the field, the stupid owner let it off the lead, and it ran straight for my on lead dog and attacked him. 😡 Unfortunately it can be virtually impossible to stop a dog from bothering/attacking another dog. 😠
 

Amymay

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Unfortunately that may well not be enough. I turned round and quickly walked in the opposite direction, after I saw a dog near the entrance to the field where we were walking, snarling and straining at the lead. Once in the field, the stupid owner let it off the lead, and it ran straight for my on lead dog and attacked him. Unfortunately it can be virtually impossible to stop a dog from bothering/attacking another dog. 😠
No, in the example you give - nothing is going to be enough.

But let’s not forget that dog attacks are fairly few and in between. But if your dog (as in the op’s dog) is likely to react negatively to another dog coming near the best cause of action is to walk in the opposite direction with little fuss.
 

Andie02

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20 September 2018
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Unfortunately that may well not be enough. I turned round and quickly walked in the opposite direction, after I saw a dog near the entrance to the field where we were walking, snarling and straining at the lead. Once in the field, the stupid owner let it off the lead, and it ran straight for my on lead dog and attacked him. 😡 Unfortunately it can be virtually impossible to stop a dog from bothering/attacking another dog. 😠
How awful and terrifying for you and again totally unnecessary. I would carry a whip or like PaS said a walking stick and use it with force with the handle end, and if possible have someone with you also carrying a big stick.
 

ponyparty

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My thinking in not walking in the opposite direction was to try not to encourage the other dog to chase (as poor boy had just been chased last week). But it didn't matter either way unfortunately, I think it would have come over whatever I'd done and the owners had absolutely zero recall. But I will deffo try that next time! Along with carrying a whip with me.
 

FinnishLapphund

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Personally, I try to keep myself between my bitches, and any unwelcome approaching dog/dogs, regardless if I've chosen to stand still, or to continue moving in some direction.

But dogs have a mind of their own, and sometimes I've not managed to get mine to where I want them/they haven't stayed in that position when the other dog/dogs got closer. So like with other things, you can only try to do your best.

Carrying a whip, or walking stick, sounds like a really good plan. Perhaps try to make yourself a little mentally prepared by thinking through some possible scenarios. Besides, if it gets known among the dog owners that you carry a whip, and isn't afraid of using it to defend your dog, perhaps they'll start to try to avoid you. One could at least hope.
 

ponyparty

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15 October 2015
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Yep, I think whip and sharp tongue is the way forward. A shame as it's not really in my nature to be like that, I'm generally a sociable person who wouldn't say boo to a goose... unless provoked ;) I'm seeing a lot of parallels between me and my dog right now haha!
 
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