Farrier/Lami advice needed for my TB

Ziggy_

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My horse was shod yesterday and as the farrier trimmed her foot he pointed out that the white line was slightly 'stretched' and was a reddish colour - he said it can be an early sign of laminitis.

I moved yards 4 months ago from a place where she had a lot of hard feed, no turnout and very limited hay. For the past 4 months she has lived out, the grass was very good but there is very little left now, she has ad-lib hay and is fed 1kg of the Winergy trial feed a day (recommended amount 3kg).

She is in good condition but not overweight, she is worked for about an hour a day, mostly on soft surfaces and we do roadwork with very little trotting, although she has thrown 2 splints so there must have been quite a bit of concusssion happening when she runs round in the field. The farrier said the fact that she has rapidly changed condition over the past few months could be a factor. Her hooves are growing incredibly fast and look long 3 weeks after each shoeing.

So, my question is...

Firstly, is my farrier right?
And secondly, what do I do about it?
 

bensababy

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get your vet out to confirm his fears. Just would like to point out that they dont always need/have to be overweight to get Laminitis. I hope everything goes ok for you.
 

hellybelly6

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Agree with Bensababy.

Also, lots of nice fresh grass can dramatically increase hoof growth and maybe this is the cause for the white line problem.

Either way, call out the vet.
 

TGM

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Yes, your farrier is right, it can be an early sign of laminitis. Has there been any unsoundness, lameness or footiness at all?

Diet-wise, make sure that any hay fed is low in sugars - if you don't know the analysis then soak the hay to remove some of the soluble carbohydrates. Personally, I would play safe and only give feeds that have been analysed as safe for laminitics - things like Spillers Happy Hoof, Spillers High Fibre Cubes, Dengie AlfaBeet, Dengie HiFi Lite, etc.
 

OrangeEmpire

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Laminitis can be a concussion-type injury too. As she's already thrown splints due to it then I'd be thinking it isn't her feed that is the issue. What terrible bad luck. Luckily tho it sounds like you've caught it early. I'd get the vet out ASAP and decide how best to manage her from here. Good luck!
 

Ziggy_

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She hasn't been lame at all but she was fidgety for the farrier yesterday which I thought was unusual even before he said anything.

I will be calling the vet but what should I be doing in the meantime? Is she Ok with ad lib hay or should I be restricting it, should she be excercised or stabled?

I've read up what to do about fat ponies with laminitis but i don't know if the same applies for other causes?
 

angiebaby

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The same treatment as for any laminitic, stable on a deep bed until the vet arrives. If not overweight then ad lib hay should be ok. Hope it isn't laminitis
frown.gif
 

Fransurrey

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Hope your horse is ok, OP. Henry was on a deep shavings bed and I gave him soaked hay, to reduce the starch, but ad-lib. He was overweight, though. Are her pulses raised at all?
 

Ziggy_

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Her pulses are normal and there is no heat in her feet or coronet band. Am hoping she will be OK.

Vet coming out first thing in the morning.
frown.gif
 

foraday

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Right there are several kinds of Laminitus-concussive and mechanical being two kinds very misunderstood! Of course there is steriodal laminitus as well as the known 'laminitus' aka fat pony type!

Celia Marr (TOP equine vet at Rossdales) has published several cases and does lectures at Rossdales concerning the management of cases.

Top fit endurance horses get concussive laminitus!

If your horses feet are growing a lot then your farrier should have already told you to have your horses feet done every four weeks. Possibly using two quarter clips and a rolled toe or natural balance shoes.

To help with the concussion then your farrier should be discussing the use of Natural Balance shoes and/or Equi Pak for the soles.

Road work should be ELIMINATED. Sorry but any hard ground will just get another outbreak of concussive laminitus.

Rubber mats (not the hard heavy ones) but the ones that give and have a spongy but not absorbent appearance should be in the stable with a nice layer of either shavings or cushion bed to help the standing when in the stable.

Ask your vet and Farrier to work together as daily bute helps also as well as Lamiguard. Check on the Farriers Registration Council to see if your farrier is a remedial farrier-his/her qualifications will be listed and there is a guide to the qualifications.

Also if you have an equine spa nearby this will also help! A cheaper alternative is Ice Boots from America. A couple of hours everyday will be fantasitic for your horse-not only for the reducing of the inflamation but when the legs warm up again the rush of new fresh blood will help the laminae no end!

Good luck! PM me if you want further help.
 
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