fencing options......suggestions please!

TigerTail

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So I have a fence which needs replacing, its currently stock fencing which is totally knackered and should've been replaced years ago, we've only just bought the field. Its between myself and a neighbour. He is talking about bringing colts next winter which worries me as I have two mares I don't want cob x's coming out of :eek:

So Post and rail - nice and solid but they bite it/scratch on it etc

Horse netting is coming up hugely expensive - P+R is cheaper!

What else??
 

Fides

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I did posts with electric wire for the 'middles' of the field using tube insulators like this

insulator-tubing.jpg


Then round the edges post and rail with long insulators on the top and a strip of electric wire.

You could point them outwards as well as upwads if you wanted further electrical protection ;)

610Op3Op0YL._SL1500_.jpg


Also having had a colt your fencing will need to be at least 1m50 high :(
 

Tiddlypom

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A double fence, and plant a mixed native hedge in between.

We put up sheep netting topped with two strands of plain wire on our boundary, and then left a gap of about 6 feet to the inner fence of post and rail. We have off set insulators on the top rail, and run a strand of electric string along it. We planted a hawthorn hedge in between the two, its been there for four years and is already nice and thick, and we have just topped it back to a height of 5' (will allow it to grow to 6' plus eventually).

Its a neat stock proof arrangement, and means that next doors animals (only sheep at the mo) are kept at a decent distance away from ours.
 

Suelin

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A double fence, and plant a mixed native hedge in between.

We put up sheep netting topped with two strands of plain wire on our boundary, and then left a gap of about 6 feet to the inner fence of post and rail. We have off set insulators on the top rail, and run a strand of electric string along it. We planted a hawthorn hedge in between the two, its been there for four years and is already nice and thick, and we have just topped it back to a height of 5' (will allow it to grow to 6' plus eventually).

Its a neat stock proof arrangement, and means that next doors animals (only sheep at the mo) are kept at a decent distance away from ours.

We've done similar to this. Looks really good when it matures and creates a really solid barrier against all comers.
 

TigerTail

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Oo I'm loving the hedge idea - just not sure how to go about it. Obv need something horse friendly and fast growing like hawthorn I guess, but then you have to have the temp fence far enough away they can't eat it before its mature.....

Shall go and google equi fencing as I don't know what that is
 

Abby-Lou

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I have just had my fencing for my new field completed. I was so lucky and got 10 reels of horse fencing on ebay cheaper than stock fencing. Couldn't believe my luck there would have been no way I would have been able to afford this at full price. How about stock fencing sandwiched between post and rail to keep cost down. I'm also growing on bare root hawthorn plants at the minute to plant out next year. Bascially planted 4 roots in one 15 litre pot got thirty of them lined up in my back garden. We bought some mature plants which ranged from £35 each for 6ft to £15 for 40cm they are really strong plants but it gets hugely expensive if you have a huge area. I would say shop around for quality plants as I have had two false starts with two nurserys and have really learnt on my way with hedging.
 

Dry Rot

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I've Rylock (sheep netting) boundary fence, then ten meters planted with trees (Scots pine, larch, cherry, and mountain ash but today I'd include beech and hawthorn), then permanent electric off a mains energiser on the home side with white tape cable tied to the top wire for visibility. It works well and any time a pony has gone through (vary rare but it does happen) the wire has caused zero damage to the ponies. The electric fence is five wire for sheep but I can disconnect the electricity to all but the top wire so it gives a real shock! I have mares and fillies, also a stallion and three colts, on 15 acres but I always ensure there are double fences between the sexes and I've never had anything break through.

Planting trees is always a good idea. I am currently burning wood on my stove from trees over 12 inches thick that I planted 20 years ago! It is very easy to plant a tree and, if it turns out to be in the wrong place, just as easy cut down. Trees look good and provide shelter and firewood when all other sources of energy are getting more expensive.
 

amandap

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I'd go for the double fence (one electric) and plant hedging between idea. However, horses will eat young hedge plants so neighbour may need to put electric his side. If you have a good rapport perhaps you could share the cost of the hedge?
 

CPayne

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Not sure about the stallion bit but pressure treated creosote post and rail won't get eaten. Have had some up for 10 years now it's not been touched.
 

Tiddlypom

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We bought our hawthorn hedging plants as bare rooted whips, which can only be planted when the plant is dormant (approx Nov to March). They come in bundles of 50, I think that we planted 250 (in a weekend).

http://www.ashridgetrees.co.uk/hedg...-packs/quickthorn-hawthorn-bushes-hedge-packs

We bought the smallest, cheapest option and planted it ourselves (its actually quite easy). The whips were about two feet tall, and you have to to prune them back to a foot tall immediately after planting. We also had to add a protective spiral tree guard (rabbit protection) and a bamboo cane to each hedge plant, and I think these cost more than the plants!

http://www.ashridgetrees.co.uk/tree-planting-accessories/planting-accessories/spiral-tree-guards

As I said earlier, the hedge has grown very well in its 4 years, and was over 7 feet tall in places a fortnight ago. We were advised to cut it back down to about 5', to encourage the hedge to bush out, and then gradually allow it to grow to the desired final height. It looks great already.

The young hedge is a tasty snack for horses, rabbits and sheep but as long as you protect it early on, it will do you proud.
 

Gift Horse

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Where possible I always plant hedges between fencing. In time you get good stock proof fencing which offers shade and shelter.
We buy Hawthorn 'quicks' (about 30p each) push the spade in to the earth pull toward you slightly, push the plant into the gap and pull the spade out. Very quick and easy to plant. It's best to plant hedging between autumn and spring when the plants are dormant.
 
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