France gallop exam

Follysmum

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15 February 2013
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Have already posted on over seas but thought there would be more traffic here
Could someone tell me if you need the gallop exam to do pleasure Randonnées rides in France. Do you need it for local shows also or is it for affiliated comp. sorry for all the questions am asking for a friend who is not a member. Any info would be greatly appreciated.
 
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7 September 2013
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Switzerland
I don’t believe they are normally a required no. I have been on a three day randonnée and was not asked. The center may ask the galop level you are at so that they can gauge your riding ability but shouldn’t be a barrier to actually riding.
Even unaffiliated shows require galop exams. An instructor could certify you though, a friend of mine did this with her regular trainer to enable her to compete (she didn’t learn to ride in France but owns a horse).
Hope that helps!
 

Keith_Beef

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I don't compete, yet, but I've been on plenty of trail rides, from 1/2 day up to a 3 day "randonnée équestre".

Usually, you're not, strictly speaking, required to have a particular level of "galop" or to show your "licence fédérale" where the levels are recorded. Mine only shows that I passed my level 1 exam 2014, because exams are almost always at unsuitable times for me. Organisers just ask you what equivalent level your ability is, in order to match you to a suitable horse or to advise a less difficult route, if necessary.

I'm in a mixed ability class of level 3 and 4 riders at the moment, and I'm honest about what's on my "licence" and my class, and I've not had anybody question me further or refuse to let me join a ride.

The advice from Dinkz82 is useful. If your terminology is not up to scratch in French, you'd fail a "galop" test; you need to correctly label different bits of the body, head, leg and hoof on some line drawings, same for the saddle and bridle, answer questions about different gaits, etc. You even need to know the names of a few different disciplines and identify their official symbols as used by the FFE (Fédération Française d'Equitation).

There is a practical ridden test, too, but the written part counts for quite a lot. I can't remember the way points are shared, though, and I don't have the time right now to study the rules (document here).
 

Follysmum

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Thankyou both of you that’s helpful and will pass to my friend. Her family are hoping to relocate to France and they are wanting to take part with their own horses in local Organized rides and maybe some local shows.
 

joosie

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New Zealand
Randonnées do not usually require you to have your FFE license or a Galop exam because they're essentially just social gatherings, so for the most part your friends should be ok. However some organisers WILL want you to have your license for insurance purposes, so it can sometimes depend on the event. Some areas don't do a lot of randonnées but in others they will be able to be selective.

They will, however, definitely need their FFE licence (which you renew annually and requires a medical certificate) to do any form of competing, at any level. They will also need it if they want to ride at a public riding school, join a riding club, or take part in a "stage" (training day / clinic) - they will not be allowed to ride without one. For competing they will need the Galop exam appropriate for the type / level of competition. Note France doesn't really have "local shows" like we're used to in the UK, the equivalent level would be a concours d'entraînement ("training show") which are mostly run by clubs and riding schools, and requires an FFE licence but not a Galop exam. After that everything is affiliated. To compete at Club level (riding club type competition) you need your Galop 4, for Amateur level you need your Galop 7.

They will also have to have their horses registered with the FFE before they can compete.
 
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