Futurity Question

clair

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Ok, I'll do my best to get this down with out it sounding like twoddle!! lol

We've been awarded a second premium for our filly and had some lovely feed back. As the only horse in the country with her breeding out on the scene due to her being one of new breed being introduced to the uk I am really pleased with our result.

My question is how does our second premium relate to the horse industry and market place, what would the competion expectations be of a horse at this premium???
 

Partoow

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Hi think your horse is super and well put together.
As a second premium she would be expected to be a national level horse.
probably in dressage she would make a good restricted riders horse . I would think she would do really well and be out there performing for a long time to come as her conformation looks really sound.
Not sure about jumping... cant say thats my thing but thats the sort of expectation i would have.
Elite would be the kind of horses that would make the Equine pathway, which identifies potential Olympic/international team horses.
Therefore first premium would be open riders dressage horses that would be national level and possibly international .
Hope that gives you some idea.
personally dont think breeders can go far wrong breeding lovely well put together horses that will be about for a long time aimed at the amateur rider.
 

Zebedee

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[ QUOTE ]

personally dont think breeders can go far wrong breeding lovely well put together horses that will be about for a long time aimed at the amateur rider.

[/ QUOTE ]

Echo this 100%. Whilst we'd all like to breed a world beater the reality is that world beating horses need world beating riders. Both are minority groups !!!
I'm very proud of all my homebreds, who are well put together, good looking & above all nice tempered & amenable.
 

clair

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Thankyou, this is what i thought but just needed to clarifie as is a bit of a haze.

My aim was to breed for the amature market as i can see that there are an awful lot of horses bred for the elite market that don't make the grade for what ever reason then filtering down into your main stream of rider and that problems are then ocuring as people over horse themselves or temperment doesn't suit.

It's reasuring to get the confimation that your where you expected and wanted to be. xxxx

This applies to myself also, having ended up with a warmblood mare of luckyboy blood lines. When she was nice she was great, get her on a bad day and she was wicked. Yes i'd competed her and did do badly but i would stuggle to say she was a pleasure to own.
 

pinktiger

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[ QUOTE ]
[ QUOTE ]

Echo this 100%. Whilst we'd all like to breed a world beater the reality is that world beating horses need world beating riders. Both are minority groups !!!
I'm very proud of all my homebreds, who are well put together, good looking & above all nice tempered & amenable.

[/ QUOTE ]

beautifully said Z!!
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cruiseline

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[ QUOTE ]

Echo this 100%. Whilst we'd all like to breed a world beater the reality is that world beating horses need world beating riders. Both are minority groups !!!

[/ QUOTE ]

I so agree, this is one of the reason I got into breeding in the first place (but from the other side of the gate) I have a rider who IMO is one of the best producers of young horses I know. I was thoroughly fed up in going around the country looking at youngster that either had bad confirmation or, more often, had been badly handled/backed. The amount of youngsters we have had to correct both on the ground and under saddle before we could actually put some decent work into them is amazing.

A horse is only as good as the rider on their backs, and as we breed horses to be ridden, it is very important to get it correct the first time as that is the foundation for the future.

I know that was slightly off topic, but I had to comment
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grin.gif
 

Zebedee

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[ QUOTE ]


My aim was to breed for the amateur market as I can see that there are an awful lot of horses bred for the elite market that don't make the grade for what ever reason then filtering down into your main stream of rider and that problems are then ocuring as people over horse themselves or temperment doesn't suit.

[/ QUOTE ]

Beautifully put. If we're not careful we'll end up with as many surplus competition horses as there are racehorses. I seem to remember something about Paul Schokemole (sp) breeding 200 foals a year, & on average only still owing about 4 of them when it was time to break them in, the others having been discarded (sold on). As Silversons says these horses may not have world class ability, but they don't necessarily have the temperament for the amateur part time rider either.
Congratulations on making a conscious decision to breed horses suitable for the biggest slice of the market, & from the post above doing so sucessfully as well.
 

TangoCurly

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[ QUOTE ]

My aim was to breed for the amature market as i can see that there are an awful lot of horses bred for the elite market that don't make the grade for what ever reason then filtering down into your main stream of rider and that problems are then ocuring as people over horse themselves or temperment doesn't suit.


[/ QUOTE ]

It sound to me that you have achieved a lovely horse that is actually better than you were aiming for. Well done, and lets see some piccies!

bye!
 
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