growing pains?

ihatework

Well-Known Member
Joined
7 September 2004
Messages
21,761
Visit site
I personally take the term growing pains to mean mild discomfort a young horse may experience while in a growth spurt, often just a basic muscle weakness etc. or a reduced gait quality due to being a bit bum high etc.

If a vet tried telling me it was 'growing pains' on a noticeably lame horse I wouldn't be best pleased
 

twisteddiamond

Well-Known Member
Joined
28 October 2006
Messages
1,195
Location
rowlands gill, gateshead
Visit site
he is lame on both front legs some days more than others he hasnt been worked for about 9 weeks because he hasn't been sound enough hes on box rest now but the vet wants him brought up to full work over a month while on a sachet of bute a day
he has just turned 4 and is approx 17hh
 

ihatework

Well-Known Member
Joined
7 September 2004
Messages
21,761
Visit site
I would be asking your vet a few probing questions and would probably consider a second opinion at this point.

What do nerve blocks, scans and xrays show?
 

Maesfen

Extremely Old Nag!
Joined
20 June 2005
Messages
16,720
Location
Wynnstay - the Best!
photobucket.com
If he's that big and that young, then yes, it could be growth related but I don't see how working him on bute, if he's not strong enough anyway, is going to prove much except possibly cause him more problems for the future.
I think I would be seriously considering a change of vets and getting something like scans done to pinpoint the problem if you don't have a clue where he's wrong; also your farrier would be worth using just in case it is only a balance problem. IMHO and experience, you don't work big young horses hard (a full work up with only a month's work after box rest is hard!), not if you want them to last you for years; that is the sure fire way of bringing future trouble down on your head.
Will be very interested in hearing the outcome.
 

JanetGeorge

Well-Known Member
Joined
25 June 2001
Messages
7,006
Location
Shropshire/Worcs. borders
www.horseandhound.co.uk
[ QUOTE ]
If he's that big and that young, then yes, it could be growth related but I don't see how working him on bute, if he's not strong enough anyway, is going to prove much except possibly cause him more problems for the future.
I think I would be seriously considering a change of vets and getting something like scans done to pinpoint the problem if you don't have a clue where he's wrong; also your farrier would be worth using just in case it is only a balance problem. IMHO and experience, you don't work big young horses hard (a full work up with only a month's work after box rest is hard!), not if you want them to last you for years; that is the sure fire way of bringing future trouble down on your head.


[/ QUOTE ]

Ditto, ditto, ditto! Your vet needs shooting!! (Badly - so he suffers!) Anything of that size - at that age - showing bi-lateral lameness needs 1) Rest; 2) Rest; and 3) More Rest! He also needs investigation to determine the cause of lameness - and if there is anyone near you who does thermal imaging, that is quite a cheap and effective way of narrowing down the location of the lameness!

It may be that he is shin sore, or at worst he may have OCD. But working him at this point is WRONG!!
 

jaffs

Well-Known Member
Joined
7 February 2003
Messages
377
Visit site
I totally agree with Janet. Change your Vet.
That's a big youngster and it's lame because something's hurting
frown.gif
Probably is shin sore, but could be OCD.
Masking the pain and working it will really create a chronic problem.
 

JanetGeorge

Well-Known Member
Joined
25 June 2001
Messages
7,006
Location
Shropshire/Worcs. borders
www.horseandhound.co.uk
Just to answer your original question, 'growing pains' is a common simplification of the condition more correctly called physitis (physis = growth plate, itis = inflammation). Growth plates are the areas within the bones of young horses from which the bones grow or lengthen. (In adults, the plates have "closed" and are no longer present.)

It is a condition of foals - and occasionally yearlings or two year olds (particularly seen in 2 year old racehorses!) It should NOT be seen in a 4 year old.

In foals, the disease can be caused by infection - or excess nutrition. There are loads of treatment options depending on cause - but if your vet MEANT physitis when he said 'growing pain' he got it wrong on two counts. In addition to being unlikely in a 4 year old, the correct treatment for a mild case is diet and exercise RESTRICTION!

And if he was actually suggesting OCD (which is another condition of fast growth) then again - complete box rest and diet restriction are called for.
 
Top