Gypsy cobs

MyBoyChe

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17 April 2008
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N. Bucks
Dyou know what, Ive got a whole herd of them quite close to me, owned by a good old fashioned gypsy breeder. Ive never seen any of them lame, never seen a case of lami or colic and they all look well. I assume they do suffer with itchy feathers as the only thing I ever notice is occasionally they will be rubbing one back leg against the others. Its a breeding herd with 1 stallion out with his mares, they all foal safely and the foals are a delight to watch. I often chat with him when I see him at the field, very interesting guy and lovely horses
 

eahotson

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4 June 2003
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merseyside
Dyou know what, Ive got a whole herd of them quite close to me, owned by a good old fashioned gypsy breeder. Ive never seen any of them lame, never seen a case of lami or colic and they all look well. I assume they do suffer with itchy feathers as the only thing I ever notice is occasionally they will be rubbing one back leg against the others. Its a breeding herd with 1 stallion out with his mares, they all foal safely and the foals are a delight to watch. I often chat with him when I see him at the field, very interesting guy and lovely horses
Very interesting.Thank you for that.Must be an interesting guy.
 

MrsCentaur

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20 September 2019
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Hello! Mine came home six weeks ago - he was bred by Baronsdown, a small hobbyist breeder in Kent, and is an utterly splendid chap.

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He is splendid. Charmingly friendly and extremely safe on the ground and a comfortable - if whizzy - ride, but he's only young and I don't think he saw very much schooling before I had the pleasure of bringing him home. I think he is quite clever as well - it doesn't take him long to pick up a new skill. The downside is that he gets bored rather quickly!

Mane and feather care are a faff, though.
 

planete

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5 May 2010
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New Forest
PSSM1. I would always test for it before buying. My cob is thankfully free of it but it was a real worry when I was trying to decide whether he was merely being a lazy temperamental git or of suffering from a myopathy. After being given the all clear he is now learning work can be fun.
 

The Fuzzy Furry

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24 November 2010
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The yard, home or coal face.....
Ref conformation, many tend to be straight in the rear legs and have very upright pasterns all round. Often the heavy ones will move quite wide too.

A good sloping shoulder is often elusive and neck often set low.
Apart from the mites and course feathering.

On the whole they have good feet and a very good constitution.

Dont get too carried away by colour (tho a black or dark tail in a mare is much easier to deal with on a daily basis, but look at the animal as you would with any other, for conformation issues that might be a problem when working under saddle or in harness.
 

eahotson

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4 June 2003
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merseyside
Hello! Mine came home six weeks ago - he was bred by Baronsdown, a small hobbyist breeder in Kent, and is an utterly splendid chap.

View attachment 76623
View attachment 76624

He is splendid. Charmingly friendly and extremely safe on the ground and a comfortable - if whizzy - ride, but he's only young and I don't think he saw very much schooling before I had the pleasure of bringing him home. I think he is quite clever as well - it doesn't take him long to pick up a new skill. The downside is that he gets bored rather quickly!

Mane and feather care are a faff, though.
Lovely.How big is he?
 

I'm Dun

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20 May 2021
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420
Mites and PSSM along with weight control means I wont have one again. PSSM is horrible and its hard to test for it before purchase in the current market. There are plenty of myopathies that still cant be tested for either, so even if you do test its not guaranteed. I find managing mites horrible and never ending as well.
 

planete

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5 May 2010
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New Forest
I think I must have been very lucky with mites and M & S. My vet gave me four syringes of Ivermectin pour on which got rid of the mites and they have not come back yet after several months (I do not stable). And the bit of mallenders he had has also gone after being softened with some ordinary ointment for a few weeks. I brush his feathers once in a blue moon, never wash any part of him and feed no alfalfa or chaff, just a balancer and some grass nuts I use as training rewards. Now I have got used to his quirks and he has got used to mine we really enjoy each other's company. He would not have suited me twenty years ago but for the quiet hacking and playing in the school that are all I can do nowadays he is just right (not saying he could not do more with a different rider though).
 

laura_nash

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17 July 2008
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Ireland
I have two. Neither have great conformation, but I don't ask them to do anything very athletic so they are fine for me. I have no problems with mites or mallenders / sallendars, though both arrived with both. I found those easy to resolve and they haven't come back. Both are ridden barefoot.

My big cob has a bad dust allergy, but I don't think that is breed related.

They're very accident and trouble free generally (touch wood) and very sane and sensible when in sticky situations which helps with avoiding accidents.

Both are very good doers though, that is a constant battle.
 

Sossigpoker

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14 September 2020
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562
My cob has mild mallenders, I just moisturise daily. He had mites on arrival but Farriers mite spray and shampoo sorted that. Turn out on grass needs to be only a few hours a day as our grass is too good for a cob . He is quite sensitive physically and mentally but he's as honest as they come and is very sweet and very much bonded with me.
 

Cinnamontoast

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6 July 2010
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I have shares in baby oil! He arrived with severe mallenders/sallenders which everyone thought was mud fever. I oil his legs thoroughly once a week or so. It’s tricky to get through the feather to the skin but clipping is a trauma! He’s a bit filthy here, just been in the lunge pen where he tends to buck/fart/squeal.
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I think the misconceptions surrounding cobs are disappearing. Mine is speedy, very well-behaved, quite spooky and yes, food oriented!
 

DizzyDoughnut

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7 January 2013
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592
My borrowed cob came as a bit of a shock to the system after years of smaller natives.
I had no idea how much maintenance feathers required, I could hardly even burrow through them to feel his leg. I felt some scabs but couldn't see them to find out what I was dealing with so we had to clip his legs. Since then the scabs have gone and I found a supplement which helps with his mallenders and we've had no problems since.
He is clumsy and comes in with random scraps that I can only assume comes from foraging in the hedges. But he is amazing and totally worth the faff of feather maintenance.

He's friendly, sensible and completely unflappable. I hadn't ridden for years and when I got on him for the 1st time he stood like a rock while I dithered and flapped about getting on, then waited till I was ready before he even moved an inch. He hadn't been ridden for about year and he was still a complete Saint and totally looked after me. Despite his tank like size he makes you feel so safe whatever you are doing with him.
 

butcher108

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15 October 2020
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178
I’ve had my mare for less than a year… she’s not what I was looking for but I bought her from a friend. She did have a few scabby bits under her belly and mallenders but she’s been fully clipped/defeathered and the sore bits have been sorted with some medicated shampoo and the mallenders are pretty much gone now and not bothering her. Although it’s a pain having to keep clipping, she is the most angelic pony I’ve ever met. Never puts a foot wrong or spooky. But yes as others have mentioned she is a little round, so keeping the weight off can be tricky!
 

Moogleberry

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17 October 2012
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122
Had my boy fir five years.. as others have said mallanders and sallanders, luckily mine has neither, but feather mites are an issue, I keep him clipped and hogged which solves the mite and stopping him getting too hot problem but he is VERY pink skinned and sensitive so have to be very careful with him once he’s clipped, otherwise he is lovely, easy on the ground good to load and take out, he has a great attitude to life
 

MissTyc

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25 June 2010
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South East
I've had a few and the love of my life is a gypsy cob gelding.
They are robust, loyal, athletic within reason, brave, good sense of humour ... Fantastic breed.
BUT they are built to go steady all day long (and they can), and I have found that when they achieve higher levels of fitness they do become more vulnerable - they can be heavy on their joints even in peak condition; they are prone to various myopathies. They're not really built for speed and height but certainly don't tell them that! I have done well on my cobs over the last 15 years but I do find them limited in competition. At BE100, we just can't make the optimum time, no matter how fit and willing. At peak speed my 14.3hh cob looks and feels like he is flying, but we are then effortlessly overtaken by OTTBs ...
 
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