hay - tips on using nets ...

tankgirl1

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Has all their hay gone by 8pm? Do they have any left in the morning? Are they overweight or poor at all?
Ideally they should have adlib hay so they always have something to eat (as long as no health/weight issues)
 
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Deleted my first comment because I misunderstood the situation.

If they're in overnight, and they've finished their hay by 8pm, you can't really leave them stood all that time with nothing to eat.

You could trial one regular haynet and one tiny holed trickle feeder net and see how much they still have left at bedtime. But if they're still finishing it all by then, then you might have to carry on going back up in the evening to top up (sorry!)
 
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JulesRules

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I was going to suggest the same as @ycbm. I have 2 good doers so can't give ad lib.

Mine have 2 haynets each - a small normal hole net with a slab of hay (which they always go for first) and 2 to 3 slabs in a big trickle feeder net. They also have a treat ball with high fibre nuts.

Once they have finished that lot they eat their straw beds.
 
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Shilasdair

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You could try giving them lower nutrient forage for when their haynets run out.

I use HiFi Lite chaff in tub trugs, as well as Horsehage Timothy haylage in nets which is low calorie so doesn't matter too much if they self-stuff.

Horses fed a variety of different forages have more natural time budgets too, I believe (can't be bothered finding the studies though :D).
 

Micropony

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Just feed really massive nets with as much hay as you can cram in, and more than one if necessary. If they have been used to standing without hay for periods of time, they will guzzle like nobody's business to start with. But once they get used to the fact they always always have hay, they will slow down and eat less. I know you can't easily do this with fatties, but if there are no weight issues it always works. Might take a few months though, especially if you have an older horse who's been used to running out of hay between feed times.
 

meleeka

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Small holed nets are the way to go. I mostly feed pretty much ad-lib but the cob has a normal net then a small holed one 25mm which takes him pretty much all night to eat. He still has more hay than I’d like, but he’s not stood around hungry so it’s a compromise.
 

WelshD

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I put in various fibre sources like a hay net, a net of haylage and a trub trug of chaff in different parts of the stable, sometimes a treat ball of cubes etc - i find they will move from place to place and graze and this does stop them gorging, I've had one with ulcers so although I admit its a faff it really does help to keep his tummy happy, if you want a simpler option maybe use a small hole net and a larger holed net?
 

CanteringCarrot

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I've got a lattice style hay net and a small hole net. I cram them both full and soak one of them. They'll last easily into the next day. They're decent sized and I really pack them.

You can also double net. Or just fill a 3rd with straw for something to pick at when the hay is gone.
 

Squeak

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Just feed really massive nets with as much hay as you can cram in, and more than one if necessary. If they have been used to standing without hay for periods of time, they will guzzle like nobody's business to start with. But once they get used to the fact they always always have hay, they will slow down and eat less. I know you can't easily do this with fatties, but if there are no weight issues it always works. Might take a few months though, especially if you have an older horse who's been used to running out of hay between feed times.
This, I find that the first week or so of adlib hay they tend to eat really quickly but as soon as they realise they've got enough to last them and they're not going to go hungry then they slow down and only eat normal amounts.
 
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