Help please

gemstone

Active Member
Joined
12 June 2008
Messages
39
Location
London
Visit site
I was all set to buy a fab horse which i assumed would easily pass his vetting - but horses will be horses and he failed the flexion bit, due to fetlock pain. The vet reckons it might be arthritis (he's only 10!) and estimates he will almost certainly go lame within 1-2 years, though at the mo he's fine. Other than that, he is my perfect horse.
frown.gif
frown.gif
I don't know what to do now! I can't really afford to buy him, only for him to go lame and be unsellable next year, not to mention insurance if someone covers him. I'm tempted to offer to loan him, but I don't know what I would do with him when he goes lame, apart from find a retirement sanctuary for him or something. Won't he get bored being left in a field at 11 or 12?? Or should I just leave it? Sorry about the mental diarrhoea, I'm so confused, any advice would be really handy. Cheers in advance x
 

Kenzo

Well-Known Member
Joined
28 February 2008
Messages
13,929
Location
Yorkshire
Visit site
There are many many more perfect horses out there, that will pass a vetting and of course will give you years and years of riding.

I know its hard if you have got your heart set on him but I think you will be heading for disappointment in the long run unless you can afford to keep him and buy another one once he's retired from being ridden etc, yet still aford to keep him and look after them both equally etc.

Just because a horse cant be ridden due to arthritis, doesnt mean to say that the cant live a happy normal life (depending on how bad he gets obviously) they can be perfectly happy living out and smooching around a field all day...its what they do, they also can still enjoy being taken for walks, still being fussed over and groomed and cared for just like any other horse etc so I dont think you'd have to worry too much about him being bored as such.

Having the horse on loan is I think the only option if you cant walk away and concentrate on finding another but then to be fare on the horse I personally (if it were me) would feel it was my duty to carry on caring for him even though his ridden career was over.

You also have to think about his living arrangments, obviously you cant put a horse that is suffering from arthritis in a field full of active horses that may run him round and cause further pain, he'll need to be kept in a quiet heard etc and be prepaired for vet bills too.

smile.gif


The question you need to ask yourself is this...is your idea of a perfect horse, one that will go lame in a few years that cant be ridden?
 

kerilli

Well-Known Member
Joined
1 April 2002
Messages
27,417
Location
Lovely Northamptonshire again!
Visit site
Leave it, walk away. That's what you paid for the vetting for, after all. You will find another one who does not have such a serious potential problem, it might take a while but it will be worth it. "Everything happens for a reason", even the stuff that seems bad at the time, imho. Best of luck finding a super sound horse who won't break your heart..
 

catembi

Well-Known Member
Joined
12 March 2005
Messages
12,886
Location
N Beds
Visit site
Agree with Kerilli.

I lost my horse Catembi last year, & when I was horse hunting, the first 2 I really liked both failed the vetting. I was really fed up at the time, having spent about £400+ on vettings & still not having a horse, so I know how you feel.

But then horse no 3 was Adrian, who passed a 5 stage. Now I'm really pleased the first 2 failed as he's far, far better than either of the others.

Horses are v good at getting things wrong with them, so you really need to give yourself a fighting chance by starting with one that *doesn't* have something wrong with it. And better to 'waste' £200 on a failed vetting than spend thousands on lameness investigations & treatment.

I know it's hard at the moment, but you need to forget this horse & start looking again. There are thousands out there, & there will be one that's just right for you.
 

minerva

Well-Known Member
Joined
2 October 2006
Messages
2,754
Location
Just whistle
www.heliosgallery.com
i had the same thing happen back in May, he was my perfect horse and i was so upset, but i did walk away and my lovely new boy was waiting for me round the corner he flew through the vetting and i am glad i didnt risk it with the other lad - keep looking XXX
 

merlinsquest

Well-Known Member
Joined
13 November 2005
Messages
8,924
Location
Surrey/hants
Visit site
I have to opposite story to tell...... Merlin without doubt had his problem when I bought him.... arthritis to one fetlock.... but he passed the vetting inc flexion, and so I bought him.

Looking back it was the best thing I could have done.

He is a lovely horse, and although I have not had the 100% use out of him that I could have done, I have enjoyed nearly every minute. He has never been off of work, just the vet got me all worried about him.... but now says that he is ok to keep on working.

Sadly you cant look into the future with your potential horse, so the advice would still be to keep on looking
frown.gif
 

perfectpolly

Well-Known Member
Joined
27 June 2008
Messages
172
Visit site
i bought my mare after she failed the vetting on a flexion test....got her cheaper, but still a risk i know!!! the vet was good...he said it could be artritis, but also could be foot sore due to no shoes and just been trimmed. i took the risk, went with gut instinct, as i only wanted a hack. felt sick for a week! bought all the cortaflex stuff and joint supplements for the first 2months, then slowly relaxed a bit.
i can honestly say--i've had her for 15 months now and no signs of any problems. she had a bit of time off for an absess in foot, but apart from that she has been sound.
i suppose it depends on what you want the horse for, age etc.
my mare was 14, so couldn't expect her to be perfect.
flexion tests are a grey area...one day they can fail....next pass!
is there any further tests the vet could do to see if it definatley arthritis???
 

lachlanandmarcus

Well-Known Member
Joined
29 November 2007
Messages
5,762
Location
Cairngorms!
Visit site
If you want to insure the horse you might well find they exclude that whole area, so you are also at big risk financially if it does become an issue.

Walk away, I did from 2 that I paid for vettings for, and am glad I did as found Mr Right 3rd time round.
 

gemstone

Active Member
Joined
12 June 2008
Messages
39
Location
London
Visit site
It is a shame he has failed, he is by far the best horse I've seen in my price range (and he was only in it due to his owners' exceptional circumstances).
He had been missing the shoe on his other foot for four days previously so maybe that put pressure on his other foot, which apparently made that leg swell up, perhaps hence why he failed the flexion test? The vet didnt think so though, and I would always be worried and would probably never go faster than a gentle canter in fear that he suddenly go lame.
I think your all right, although he is a bargain he won't be if he costs me thousands in vet bills.
thanks for the advice guys x
 
Top