High quality but bland kibble - new rescue dog arriving

MissTyc

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I am adopting an older rescue from abroad. I am an idiot, but am now committed ...

I feed a raw diet, but have read a lot about these dogs never being exposed to high quality proteins, so have decided to get the best bland kibble to get her settled when she first arrives, and then transition to raw once she seems consistent ...

I've fed raw for over 15 years so the kibbles have changed a lot in that time! We did use canigan kibble for our terrier pup when he first arrived but he has been textbook in terms of digestion. The easiest dog I've ever fed as he can digest anything and has only had loose stool once in 4 years (which turned out to be a chicken intolerance) and never vomited (who ever heard of a dog that doesn't vomit?!?!) ...

I welcome recommendations & and also other advice to settle in our new girl when she gets here. It's been 12 years since I adopted an adult rescue and never one from abroad. This one is coming from Hungary. Yes I am terrified. Yes I am maybe stupid. Passed local rescue homechecks last May but I really wanted a smaller dog to complement our terrier who doesn't like anything bigger than himself, so here we are!
 

splashgirl45

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i would suggest you make extensive checks on the rescue if you havent already, there are some horror stories out there ,dogs not being vaccinated or checked for diseases which they then bring in to here. check out barnaby and bluebell on facebook for more info. i know that wasnt your question, you could try chappie kibble as it often gets suggested by vets when dogs have sensitive digestion..and its easy to get hold of...i know my local sainsburys and pets at home stock it...or you could use the tins if dog wont eat the kibble. you know pics are compulsary when you get your new dog:D
 

PapaverFollis

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I use Burns for mine. It's the one food the Sprollie's digestion has always been most settled on. I think it's a pretty bland choice. And Chappie tins on standby.
 

skinnydipper

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11 February 2018
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I am adopting an older rescue from abroad. I am an idiot, but am now committed ...

I feed a raw diet, but have read a lot about these dogs never being exposed to high quality proteins, so have decided to get the best bland kibble to get her settled when she first arrives, and then transition to raw once she seems consistent ...

I've fed raw for over 15 years so the kibbles have changed a lot in that time! We did use canigan kibble for our terrier pup when he first arrived but he has been textbook in terms of digestion. The easiest dog I've ever fed as he can digest anything and has only had loose stool once in 4 years (which turned out to be a chicken intolerance) and never vomited (who ever heard of a dog that doesn't vomit?!?!) ...

I welcome recommendations & and also other advice to settle in our new girl when she gets here. It's been 12 years since I adopted an adult rescue and never one from abroad. This one is coming from Hungary. Yes I am terrified. Yes I am maybe stupid. Passed local rescue homechecks last May but I really wanted a smaller dog to complement our terrier who doesn't like anything bigger than himself, so here we are!

Sorry, no advice about kibble.

The best advice I can give you when adopting a rescue dog is not to expect too much too soon.

Let the dog settle in and feel comfortable and secure.

Don't rush, allow the dog to set the pace, even if you feel you are only taking baby steps.
 
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CorvusCorax

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I had one that couldn't deal with raw or anything high protein, he did well on an own-brand fish based food for senior dogs from Jollyes, but I think it was discontinued.

Was your dog rescued from the streets/has it ever lived in a house before?
 

tiggipop

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6 November 2012
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231
i feed skinners field and trial range. have rescues of various ages / histories and even those with dodgy tums / skin have thrived.

good luck with your new addition and as others say don't be disheartened if even baby steps seem too much for dog to cope with.. my 2nd last rescue was a 20 month old bitch who had already gone through 6 homes, it took about 18 months for her to feel completely safe and i remember thinking it may never happen.

dont forget the pics when pooch arrives

x
 

Sussexbythesea

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I started my Greek rescue (8 months old) on Barking Heads which was fine. Skinners duck and rice gave him loose yellow poo.

I’ve now got him on Pets at Home Step-up to Naturals kibble which suits him fine and is a lot cheaper than Barking Heads. I also give him a 1/4 tin of Butchers tinned food with his kibble. He also eats horse poo and dead things especially bits of pheasant and fish egg cases off the beach. 🤮

He was hard work by at first and scared of the TV whether on or off- I had to cover the screen with a blanket as he kept barking at it. He was very agitated but a crate was my friend and saviour. He was scared to leave the house every day, scared of people sitting on benches etc.

He’s now about as perfect a dog as you could get. Great with the cats, horses, Children, other dogs, loves everyone and comes out hacking with the horses. Obedient and a happy all round dude.
 

MissTyc

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Thanks for all the tips!

All our dogs have been rescues, but only ever from UK Rescues. This feels a bit like blind dating! Our Rottie X GSD was the trickiest dog, so I learned a lot from her. She was 2 years old and neglected and very reactive. We got there in the end. I'll be honest; I wouldn't mind an easier ride this time round, but I know it takes time!


@splashgirl45 , I did come across many of those stories. It's totally scary, and the reality is I've done my background research but can one ever really know? I've opted for this rescue as they have full rescue backup in the UK and a foster system here.

We select this particular dog as she's 2 years old and been in kennels almost her whole life. She's never lived on the streets and spent her first four months in a home but without much care. I managed to track down her brother who moved to Glasgow last October and he seems relatively stable-minded, so I figured that's a good start ... But argh. Blind date!

Will look into the food recommendations. Thanks!
 

Odyssey

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27 February 2018
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I find Autarky white fish or turkey and potato (grain free) suit my dog with sensitive digestion well, also Vitalin duck and potato, Lukullus Barbary duck, and Markus Muhle. Fish, duck, turkey and lamb based food seem to suit most sensitive dogs in my experience, beef and chicken often don't. I've found the Skinner's "with rice" varieties good too. Good luck with your new dog, I hope you post some photos of her.
 

splashgirl45

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6 March 2010
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suffolk
Thanks for all the tips!

All our dogs have been rescues, but only ever from UK Rescues. This feels a bit like blind dating! Our Rottie X GSD was the trickiest dog, so I learned a lot from her. She was 2 years old and neglected and very reactive. We got there in the end. I'll be honest; I wouldn't mind an easier ride this time round, but I know it takes time!


@splashgirl45 , I did come across many of those stories. It's totally scary, and the reality is I've done my background research but can one ever really know? I've opted for this rescue as they have full rescue backup in the UK and a foster system here.

We select this particular dog as she's 2 years old and been in kennels almost her whole life. She's never lived on the streets and spent her first four months in a home but without much care. I managed to track down her brother who moved to Glasgow last October and he seems relatively stable-minded, so I figured that's a good start ... But argh. Blind date!

Will look into the food recommendations. Thanks!

just wanted to make sure you knew the risks, some of those stories are so sad for both the dogs and the poor people who were trying to do a good thing by rescuing....i ended up getting a puppy as it was so difficult to get a uk rescue. i dont know why as i am retired and active and my dogs always get the best, maybe at 74 they think i am too old to adopt..i will never know why i failed, but its their loss..
 

MissTyc

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25 June 2010
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just wanted to make sure you knew the risks, some of those stories are so sad for both the dogs and the poor people who were trying to do a good thing by rescuing....i ended up getting a puppy as it was so difficult to get a uk rescue. i dont know why as i am retired and active and my dogs always get the best, maybe at 74 they think i am too old to adopt..i will never know why i failed, but its their loss..
It doesn't make any sense to me; they should at least tell you why you fail!

I've never yet passed a "big name rescue" homecheck. Breed rescues have not been a problem ... So I can have a massive dog from a German Shepherd rescue but not even an oldie from the big names. Really annoying, since I don't want any specific breed. So I was delighted to pass a local rescue homecheck last year ... and have been waiting ever since for a sub 15kg female to come in ... They seem to have lovely little boys or huge females!
 
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