Hmmm.... I'm no rodeo rider......

Nutsaboutnags

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And that was proven today when I was catapulted through the air to meet the firm sand and rubber surface of my new arena! Of course I'm chuckling about it now but will be rather nervy next time I ride.... Thursday in fact. New horse, new yard, bad news :(
also brought her to yard and and she's been weaving..... Rather surprising as she's vice free! Called the YO who sold me horse on owners behalf (she's v sick), who has had her off and on since she was 4 years old and he says she has NEVER weaved before and must be her way of showing stress.... And she's never bronced... They are very reputable.... Confused! She wasn't cheap but I did make a big offer on her asking price but still feeling a bit disgruntled..... However she's a gorgeous girl (when she isn't broncing) and I don't think it would of stopped me buying her......
Not really sure what point I'm trying to make, just letting off steam :(
 

SusieT

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If it were me and a new horse bucked me off and weaved as well I'd have sent it packing. Once a weaver, likely to always be a weaver and do you want one of those?
 

LaMooch

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How long you had her? Had her back, teeth and saddle checked? I'd get her checked over an allow her to settle
 

watchmaker

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Even if you intend sending her back or what have you.... meanwhile....

Visit as often as you can. Make everything as routine as possible for her and make sure she gets some quiet time. I wouldn't compete for weeks, if that's your thing. Let her settle. Moving house is as stressful for some ponies as it is for some people - especially if she'd been at the previous yard a while.

If she has a really kind YO now, (You?) ask if you can make her life as similar as possible to the previous yard. If it was a riding school she'd be used to constant hustle and bustle so she wants a stable where she can see everything going on. If it was a few private liveries before, then she'll want the farthest, quietest stable.

Lots of horses take a couple of weeks to feel at home. Not much use when it comes to sending em back but...
 

soulfull

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Honestly I think you need to cover yourself just incase things don't improve
Ie have a conversation with vendor stating you are willing to give her time to settle but that if things don't improve you will be returning her

As someone said all horses are different. But my own personal view is that they are more settled when they know not too much has changed ie they are here to so the same job. So if they were used to being exercised most days that is what I so

My example for wanting to know nothing has changed is a horse I had owned for years. Took him to a new venue in the dark. He stood by the lorry was extremely. Nervous and spooky. But as soon as I put his tendon boots on he settled right down. He knew what he was there for and was happy

Unfortunately I've had 5 horses in 12 yrs and all have settled really quickly this way. Some have had 3 days not ridden one was left a week
 

Clodagh

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Unfortunately selling on behalf of client is a ruse to get dealers out of their legal obligations. Have you googled the phone numbers to see what comes up?
I do hope though that they are entirely reputable and she soon settles. Hope you aren't too sore.
 

Lolo

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If she's been settled at one yard for four years, and has now moved I could actually understand the weaving as a short term coping mechanism- some horses, like some people, just don't deal with stress or change well.

I'd contact the YO again and ask who taught people on the horse, and please could you have their contact details.
 

MagicMelon

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Have you changed her routine from what she was used to? Id chuck the horse out 24/7 to blow off steam so will probably be calmer to ride, plus she probably wont weave if out.
 

Love

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Can't you see from a horses feet if they are a long term weaver or not due to how it wears them? At least you'd be able to tell if it's just a new thing or if it's always done it. Hope you're not feeling too sore!
 

fatpiggy

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I had my horse for just short of 18 years and she had no stable vices whatsoever. However, one evening a couple of years before she died, I brought her in for the night, all the other horses staying in the field and she weaved like you've never seen. I suspect the OP's horse is suffering a total stress overload. OP - don't get back on her straight away, go and spend some time with her and see what makes her tick. There is plenty of time to ride her. Give her time to settle in her new home and environment. When I bought my girl I didn't ride her for several weeks, just worked her loose and got her used to my voice, and found out what verbal commands etc she knew. It was worth the wait.
 

L&M

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Assuming she only weaves in the stable could you t/o 24/7 so she breaks the habit? Then try and stable her again once she is more settled - then you will know if it is a permanent issue.

I would just let her be a 'horse' for a few days, then progress with some groundwork, and lunge well before attempting to get back on.

Good luck!
 

Nutsaboutnags

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Assuming she only weaves in the stable could you t/o 24/7 so she breaks the habit? Then try and stable her again once she is more settled - then you will know if it is a permanent issue.

I would just let her be a 'horse' for a few days, then progress with some groundwork, and lunge well before attempting to get back on.

Good luck!

Thanks so much everyone for the advice (and sympathy!!) I lunged her yesterday and she was angelic, she's been turned out every morning for 4 hours (3.5 hours more that she's ever had!) and she seems super chilled. The weaving has calmed right down and there is no physical evidence that she's a proper weaver so hoping it was just a bit of anxiety that is settling down. I have scheduled to ride her today, will lunge first and my trainer is with me.... I also will have my air jacket on just incase ;) Have butterflies just thinking of it but as my trainer says, forget that happened And move on. So I shall..... Unless it happens again in which case I'll be a mess!
Will keep you all posted.....
Nx
 

Nutsaboutnags

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How did you get on today

We did very well today :) She was angelic, we did 40 mins... I am so relieved!! I was panicking that I had bought a beautiful horse that couldn't ride.... But it was a good day :D
Thanks so much for asking!!
Nxx
 

LaMooch

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We did very well today :) She was angelic, we did 40 mins... I am so relieved!! I was panicking that I had bought a beautiful horse that couldn't ride.... But it was a good day :D
Thanks so much for asking!!
Nxx

Brilliant glad to hear it onwards and upwards and take baby steps
 

milesjess

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Give her time, get her in a routine and plenty of turnout and socialising.
I would just lunge until she seems settled more the bring in the ridden work.
Time is a massive thing... Bear in mind she's in a new place, new people, smells, horses etc, her worlds been turned upside down and she's just a little stressed by the sounds of it.
It took my old horse months to settle down and once he did he was a little gem.
 

milesjess

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^^ just seen your above reply - great news, have faith and just help her to relax in her new home.
 

Queenbee

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Let her settle. Get saddle checked. Try again.

Personally I would put the following in writing via email ideally to the YO and owner... That you have purchased the horse, that she was sold as vice free, that she has immediately started weaving (take video and attach) that she has bucked you off etc. that you were sold her as 'x' <insert description! and that this behaviour is not as described. That you reserve the right to return her within two weeks time, if all traces of this behaviour have not disappeared. I would also get her back checked, did you buy her with the tack you rode her in? Get her saddle checked too. Crack on with her and use this two weeks to give her a damn good trial and send her back if not as described if you want to.
 
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