Horse soft soles … pads?

spotty_pony

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So some of you may remember my previous post about my boy currently having soft soles - we think due to living out this winter 24/7 for the first time ever and him being on constant wet grass and them not having a chance to dry out. He is shod all round, is fine on the road/tarmac but struggles on hard, rutted ground and stony ground. I try and keep off these as much as possible obviously but we haven’t had any decent rain for ages so it’s proving tricky.

Field is still quite wet as there is lots of grass so they still aren’t drying out properly. He’s coming in for around 6 hours everyday off the grass and to let them have a good chance to dry out. I’m painting the Lucky Fox SOS formula that my farrier told me to get under his soles everyday and it is helping but farrier has suggested pads in front for one cycle of shoeing (the type that mould to the hoof sole) on his next shoeing if enough improvement hasn’t been made to give them a chance to dry out and the sole to grow. At the moment, I’m leaning towards having the pads as he is usually quite a forward ride but is definitely struggling at the moment. 😔

any advice much appreciated, and any stories of success using pads would be lovely to hear, thanks :)
 

meleeka

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The only negative about pads is thad they can make the soles softer as they don’t get the air to them. You could always do as farrier suggests, in the hope that the field is drier in a few weeks, but if not be prepared to keep them on for longer.

I’m currently trialing Red Horse products on my mare. It’s too early to say whether it works for not though but she’s never been shod so pads not an option.
 

spotty_pony

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Meleeka - apparently these are the sort that mould to the sole so there is no risk of air being trapped and then making them softer or causing thrush as that was my first thought too. He’s a very good farrier so I am leaning towards giving it a go to be honest, horse is 23 and I just want him to be more comfortable.
 

Birker2020

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Meleeka - apparently these are the sort that mould to the sole so there is no risk of air being trapped and then making them softer or causing thrush as that was my first thought too. He’s a very good farrier so I am leaning towards giving it a go to be honest, horse is 23 and I just want him to be more comfortable.
I assume its the stuff that's in a big tube like bath sealant called Equipak? Its liquid urethane, the farrier normally uses a square piece of polystyrene, tapes it to the bottom of the foot, then puts the Equipak in the gap at the heel and squeezes it in. Once its hardens in 30 seconds or so they can then take the polystyrene off.
It's not meant to breakdown, its impervious to debris and moisture. However, I found that my horse was quite heavy handed (or footed) with it, he used to paw the ground so it would break up fairly quickly. But most horses don't do that. And this was years ago so they have probably improved the formula by now!

Its good for giving support, absorbing concussion and for giving a bit more depth of sole.

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Pinkvboots

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My horse had pads on for a few shoeings and it didn't make them soft he didn't have thrush either, what can help dry out the feet is wipe off as much mud and wet as you can then use the antibacterial powder that's for mud fever it draws moisture out.

I do it when mine come in if it's particularly wet in winter probably any type of talc powder would do the same thing, savers do an athletes foot one for a £1 which I have used in the past.
 

Melody Grey

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OH’s cob is sensitive infront so our farrier has given him protection with pro-glue, rubber and fibre mix (think fibreglass). It should be harder wearing than hoof armor which is currently difficult to get in the UK. So far, he seems better on stones though it was only applied yesterday so too early to tell. We were using hoof boots for work before which were great, but wanted to try something for to and from the field (stony tracks) without needing to put on/ take off boots all the time.
My suspicion is that he’ll still be sensitive through the frog and that hoof boots would be better, though worth a try. It is expensive though- around £130 for all 4 feet, so I probably can’t continue it longer term.

My horse was remedially shod all round with pads and dental impression (at great cost!), though was tougher barefoot without hoof boots.

....in your position I’d invest in hoof boots!!
 

spotty_pony

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OH’s cob is sensitive infront so our farrier has given him protection with pro-glue, rubber and fibre mix (think fibreglass). It should be harder wearing than hoof armor which is currently difficult to get in the UK. So far, he seems better on stones though it was only applied yesterday so too early to tell. We were using hoof boots for work before which were great, but wanted to try something for to and from the field (stony tracks) without needing to put on/ take off boots all the time.
My suspicion is that he’ll still be sensitive through the frog and that hoof boots would be better, though worth a try. It is expensive though- around £130 for all 4 feet, so I probably can’t continue it longer term.

My horse was remedially shod all round with pads and dental impression (at great cost!), though was tougher barefoot without hoof boots.

....in your position I’d invest in hoof boots!!
He can’t wear hoof boots with shoes though can he? He would have to go barefoot.
 

spotty_pony

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Have you had him tested to make sure the sensitivity isn't due to Cushing's or EMS.
Not for a little while, no but he has no symptoms at all. He has been tested for both in the past though. This problem has been ongoing on and off for literally years though and has only recently got to this point of being more often and bruising of the soles appearing. I may consider getting him tested but after a lot of research I have found that Appaloosa’s generally do not have great sole thickness so it’s more likely this. If no improvement with the pads, it’s definitely something I’ll look into doing though.
 
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