I really don't know what to do ???

MrsElle

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Quick history:

28 year old 16.2 mare came to me last December very underweight and not very happy in herself.

We fought long and hard, just got her back into tip top condition, she was happy and settled and then got attacked by a dog in her field.

She lost condition rapidly and the vet warned that should infection set in it would be more than likely a PTS job
However, she pulled through and has slowly started to put the weight on. She is however still underweight (540kg) and ribby. She is also miserable. The attack took place on the 1st July and it has really impacted on her physical and mental health. She used to be the head of her little herd of two, but since becoming ill has been bullied to the bottom.

I hate to see her so miserable but am at a loss as to what to do. Following the attack we decided to retire her as she now has intermitant lameness due to the tendon damage she sustained.

Any ideas?
 

Gemsie

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Hi Mrs Elle,

Sorry to hear that your mare is under the weather following the attack.

What are you feeding her?

I have just put my old lad onto global herbs restore which seems to have given his immune system a real boost.

Also I have all mine on blue chip - which I have found excellent for condition, they do a light version for lami prone horses?

All above said if you are contemplating pts as an option - remember - they will let you know when the time is right - so if you feel that the old girlie still has fight left in her a change in diet may be all she needs to perk up and gain weight?

Its so difficult with the older horses, but am sure you will do the best by her,

Good luck

Gem
 

quirky

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Do you think it could be her lifestyle?

The reason I ask, is I had a pony who was kept at a stables for 11 years and was always in a field with one particular horse he liked. I moved, meaning pony moved too.

For 18 months after our move, he seemed really depressed. He was happy to see and be with me but just seemed miserable in himself.
It took a couple of moves to find him a yard he was happy at.

In the meantime, he'd had blood tests to check his liver and kidney function.

I'm not suggesting you move her on. In fact, I'm at a loss as to what to suggest. As she is retired, your options seem to be limited.
 

MrMeldrew

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I wonder if she is fretting about being in the same place that she was attacked and now being bottom of the pack...she'll likely be feeling insecure and vulnerable especially at her age.
Do you have a different field for her to go in or any other companion's?.Maybe something a bit wussy that could help her feel a little more in control.
 

Doris68

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11 December 2008
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Is she still happy and enjoying her life - I wonder? - only you can answer that question.

Does she have quality of life? This is a helluva an "ask" - one which I would hate to take myself, so...........sorry, but can't add much more than that really - pathetic answer sorry again!
 

Amymay

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Hi, responded to your other post yesterday re the mare. But there's more info here.

Sounds like autumn has approached, and perhaps you need to think about saying goodby.
 

Rana

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Agree with above, perhaps it's time to give serious consideration to her quality of life. Hard, I know, I'm in a similar situation myself!

However, if you decide there's still enough about her to warrant keeping her going, I would recommend a fibre only diet. I did this with my old mare (27 year old TBx) with great results - she went from 520kg to 590kg during 3 very cold months last winter. She re-established herself as boss of the herd, her coat started to gleam again, and she pranced in from the field every night - definitely a new lease of life and I reckon she's got a few good years in her yet
 

bailey14

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I would go down the homeopatic route and try Dr Bachs remedies, these have been used for hundred of years and can be very beneficial in certain cases. It might also be worthwhile asking a horse whisperer or reiki specialist to come and visit your mare, I have had an amazing experience with a particular reiki visit to my horse, I can thoroughly recommend someone to you if you are midlands based. It sounds like she has given up on life, possibly due to phychological issues following the attack on her, this is very sad and I would sadlyconsider having her PTS if the reiki cannot reveal further problems and amend her condition. It could also be that the very fact she has now been retired means she doesn't get the attention she was getting when you were riding her, ie, the companionship, grooming, talking to her, feeding her, loving her in general. I don't mean to appear rude when I say that, but horses are easy to overlook when you retire them and you may not be doing this deliberately, but maybe she feels that she has been abandoned by you somewhat, now she is no longer useful as a riding horse. Try spending some time with her, just grooming her, taking her for a walk in hand down the lane, maybe boxing her somewhere. See if this changes her demeanour.
 
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