If I had gun..... sometimes!

Tory27

Well-Known Member
Joined
28 March 2013
Messages
82
Visit site
Does anyone else suffer from their horse going through phases of not wanting to be caught? Mine does and I swear after a good 45 minutes of trying last night, if given a gun I'd have shot her! I've taken carrots, food in a scoop, even bring in the others so shes the only one left out and nope! She just gallops from one end of field to the other, round in a circles. I even leave the gate open so she could run in they've got pens in front of there stables, nope wont even do that! I've turned her out in headcoller, still cant get near her. When I can get near enough to put the leadrope on and she snatches her head up rears and pi**es off across the field. She did it the other day nearly broke my finger! I get so so angry becuse there is just no reason for it. I think to myself, I do everything for you horse, you have wonderful home, warm bed at night, rugs, fed, watered you want for nothing and you re-pay me by this behaviour! It brings me to tears with frustration. My others are not like that. So last night because I didnt have a gun, I left her out, (they normally come in at night) no food, nothing. There is plently of grass and some hay that was uneaten from the day. And I just ignored her! This morning i did the same ignored her fed the others, and turned them back out.

Am I the only one who suffers with this? Does Anyone have any suggestions? I bred this horse, shes now 15 and I love her to bits, of course I'd never shoot her but sometimes... she just makes me so angry!

Cookies for those of you who made it to the end .
 
Last edited:

Pippity

Well-Known Member
Joined
3 February 2013
Messages
3,372
Location
Warrington
Visit site
Oh, god, I sympathise. My share horse always seems to know when I particularly need him in (lesson/saddle fitter/farrier) and those are the days when he's a complete arse to catch. He HAS to be the second-to-last brought in. Any earlier and you're not getting near him; any later and he panics about being out on his own - but still won't be caught.

And, of course, the method that works one day won't work the next.

I've reached the point where I schedule lessons, etc, for first thing in the morning and, if we haven't been able to catch him the night before, just accept that I'm going to have to cancel.

The vast majority of the time, he's not even being caught to work. He's just given his dinner and put in his stable overnight.

He's turned out in a headcollar with a magnetic attachment for the leadrope, which does make it a lot easier - just need to wave the leadrope in the vicinity of the attachment, and you've got him. Once he's actually caught, his manners are spot-on and there are no attempts to make a break for it. Unfortunately, the catching can be an issue...
 

tigermoth

New User
Joined
12 April 2016
Messages
6
Visit site
Oh i feel your pain Tory27, I have had a few of these over the years. Think the longest I tried for was about 2 1/2hrs, did manage to catch the little darling in the end but like you if I had a gun.......

A lot of it seems to happen at this time of year due to changes in light, temperature & grass coming through. In other words "spring madness". Keep doing what your doing, trying what your trying & remember to vent your feelings well away from her.
Try to remember that she's not doing it just to wind you up (but oh boy it sure feels like it). When you do manage to get hold of her take a deep breath & relax. Make the contact you have as enjoyable for you both as possible.
It's not easy to deal with, is totally frustrating & normally happens when you want to do something.

You are not alone with this problem & if someone says they've never had ponies that are "naughty" to catch at times.....tell them they're flipping lucky.
 

Hayjay

Well-Known Member
Joined
20 January 2005
Messages
330
Visit site
One of my ponies is a pain to catch. He is in a fairly small paddock so I tie a long length of electric fence to a post near a corner and gradually herd him down the paddock until he is contained. But he is 12.2 and fairly quiet. Not sure I'd try it with a big exciteable horse in case they tried to run through it! They are in the winter paddock with shelters and hay overnight and ive just moved my big girl and my shetland (muzzled) into the summer field for some grass. Tried to get pony and he kept walking off! So I told him he could sod off and stay where he was 😊. I can see him out the window, ignoring his hay and staring at the other two eating grass 😈. I'm hoping he'll learn a lesson but not sure if horses have that mentality!
 

charterline

Well-Known Member
Joined
10 August 2006
Messages
551
Visit site
Can you leave a short length of rope attached to the headcollar. May get a shock when she thinks she can yank away.

It's always worse if a horse is in a large field and they can just run around and around and around to evade you.

Would suggest you put her in a small fenced off section, but I know that's not always possible on a livery yard
 

Mamamia

Well-Known Member
Joined
26 November 2007
Messages
243
Visit site
Oh yes, I have one of those.

My whole routine, and that of my other horses, revolves around her so that I don't have to try to catch her in the middle of the day. There is no rhyme nor reason to when she will and won't be caught but when she won't there is nothing you can do about it.

Once (when she was galloping around someone's newly seeded lawn - long story) someone asked me why I didn't just discipline her better - I nearly punched them!

So, I feel your pain, but haven't got any handy tips I'm afraid (other than not to have a loaded gun handy, just in case you feel tempted).
 

Crazy_cat_lady

Well-Known Member
Joined
14 January 2012
Messages
7,096
Visit site
Ooh I'm intrigued by the magnetic lead rope and headcollar where did you get that from?

I fully understand and often feel exactly what you are feeling op!

I've often wanted to send mine to McDonald's! He will look at you then has a choice of options- charging off down the field, I will then go down the end he's gone to and he will shoot back up it. Or he will trot around me/ away in the high stepping Welsh cob being a knobber way. Or and probably the most annoying, I'll get so near to getting hold of his headcollar then he will run backwards then refuse to be caught. Or he will just walk off when I'm level with his bum each time he knows exactly how near I can get without him being caught! If he had a look on his face if he was a human he'd definitely have 2 fingers up and be sneering

He almost seems to shut down, one winters day I'd spent about 2 hours trying to catch him (not out there the whole time but would go back onto the yard and let me do other jobs, yo nicely let me leave the gate to the smaller field open in the hope getting him in there would be easier, moved away or he'd never have come through the gate, he did, went across small field to shut him in and the absolute s** whipped round and galloped full pelt back into the big field right to the top. Thought we will never get him now so was getting ready to leave and he'd have had to stay out on his own all night as everything else was in when he suddenly started calling and let himself be caught as if there had been no problem!

A horse that won't be caught has to be one of the most infuriating things. And yes he will still sometimes refuse to be caught even when offered food even nuts rattled in a bucket.
 
Last edited:

AShetlandBitMeOnce

Well-Known Member
Joined
25 January 2015
Messages
5,820
Visit site
This is a controversial way of doing things, but if all other avenues have been exhausted I personally would leave her till last, and then try to catch her. If she isn't having it, go and get a lunge whip (this might require 2-3 of you if you have a large field, or half the field for a day or two) and if she runs, put the whip high above your head and keep her moving, herd her. Keep her running for a few minutes, then lower the whip so she knows you're not chasing her, and try to catch her. If she runs again, keep her moving again for a few minutes and don't let her stop. Repeat until she realises that coming in is the MUCH easier option.

I find it only takes 3-4 times of doing this and they're usually okay. All horses are individual though of course.
 
Joined
28 February 2011
Messages
16,451
Visit site
The Welsh cob is a knob to catch sometimes. He has his own way of doing things. He will.not be caught in the field under any circumstances no matter what you have to bribe him.with. you have to leave the gate open and let him wander in. As soon as he is through the gate you can catch him.no problem. Once in a while he shoots off back through the gate before you get him but not often and when he does this he just gets ignored as I have plenty of.other things to be getting on with until he is ready to come back through.

Bloody Welsh!
 

Annagain

Well-Known Member
Joined
10 December 2008
Messages
15,646
Visit site
My old boy (also a Welsh Nob) was a nightmare. You have my sympathy. * times out of 10 he was fine, but the other 2 would leave me wisihng I had a tranquiliser dart if not a gun. He thought the whole thing was a big game and would circle around me just out of reach. The second I chased I was done for. When he started, all I could do was walk away, come back with a chair, a bucket of feed and a book. Sit on chair put bucket underneath it (it had to be a deep bucket so the gap was too small for him to sneak a mouthful) ignore him and wait. If he showed interest in the feed I'd ignore him a bit longer then gather everything up and walk away. The next day he'd be begging me to catch him. It meant sacrificing the first day's activity though. He was much worse in the rain, like he wanted me to get soaked. He always seemed to know when I was in a particular hurry too!
 

fathorselover

Well-Known Member
Joined
1 November 2014
Messages
359
Location
Worcestershire
Visit site
Does anyone else suffer from their horse going through phases of not wanting to be caught? Mine does and I swear after a good 45 minutes of trying last night, if given a gun I'd have shot her! I've taken carrots, food in a scoop, even bring in the others so shes the only one left out and nope! She just gallops from one end of field to the other, round in a circles. I even leave the gate open so she could run in they've got pens in front of there stables, nope wont even do that! I've turned her out in headcoller, still cant get near her. When I can get near enough to put the leadrope on and she snatches her head up rears and pi**es off across the field. She did it the other day nearly broke my finger! I get so so angry becuse there is just no reason for it. I think to myself, I do everything for you horse, you have wonderful home, warm bed at night, rugs, fed, watered you want for nothing and you re-pay me by this behaviour! It brings me to tears with frustration. My others are not like that. So last night because I didnt have a gun, I left her out, (they normally come in at night) no food, nothing. There is plently of grass and some hay that was uneaten from the day. And I just ignored her! This morning i did the same ignored her fed the others, and turned them back out.

Am I the only one who suffers with this? Does Anyone have any suggestions? I bred this horse, shes now 15 and I love her to bits, of course I'd never shoot her but sometimes... she just makes me so angry!

Cookies for those of you who made it to the end .

I spent 3 hours helping my friend catch her horse today, little beggar!! In the end we took some electric fence posts and tape and basically built a fence around him- then we joined two lunge reins together and used it to make an even smaller space with one of us either end- and WE CAUGHT HIM!!!! The feeling of triumph was unreal - we've been trying to catch him all week without success!
 

rowan666

Well-Known Member
Joined
12 February 2012
Messages
2,135
Location
cheshire
Visit site
This is a controversial way of doing things, but if all other avenues have been exhausted I personally would leave her till last, and then try to catch her. If she isn't having it, go and get a lunge whip (this might require 2-3 of you if you have a large field, or half the field for a day or two) and if she runs, put the whip high above your head and keep her moving, herd her. Keep her running for a few minutes, then lower the whip so she knows you're not chasing her, and try to catch her. If she runs again, keep her moving again for a few minutes and don't let her stop. Repeat until she realises that coming in is the MUCH easier option.

I find it only takes 3-4 times of doing this and they're usually okay. All horses are individual though of course.

^^^ This, worked on my old sec c every time but then she was quite lazy so the second she realised I was making her work she just thought sod it I can't be arsed I'll just come in
 

irish_only

Well-Known Member
Joined
5 January 2009
Messages
1,063
Location
Somewhere snowy in winter, lovely in summer
Visit site
This is a controversial way of doing things, but if all other avenues have been exhausted I personally would leave her till last, and then try to catch her. If she isn't having it, go and get a lunge whip (this might require 2-3 of you if you have a large field, or half the field for a day or two) and if she runs, put the whip high above your head and keep her moving, herd her. Keep her running for a few minutes, then lower the whip so she knows you're not chasing her, and try to catch her. If she runs again, keep her moving again for a few minutes and don't let her stop. Repeat until she realises that coming in is the MUCH easier option.

I find it only takes 3-4 times of doing this and they're usually okay. All horses are individual though of course.

Another one to second this. I had a livery that could be a nightmare. Either wouldn't be caught or would run at you. We put her in a smaller paddock, and using a lunge whip pushed her on, and then did the 'join up' thing by turning our back on her. She would follow the person around after this. Every few weeks we would have to do it again. I am completely not a fan of the 'horsemanship' courses etc but this really does work.
 

11bluewolf

Well-Known Member
Joined
30 March 2016
Messages
167
Visit site
This may not work but maybe try doing some liberty or parelli training with her? Cant remember what its called but I've seen videos of people starting off in a round pen/ school and chasing horse away with a rope of lunge whip and then turning away from the horse and they learn to follow you and then reward her. Maybe doing lots of things like this will help????
 

splashgirl45

Lurcher lover
Joined
6 March 2010
Messages
15,566
Location
suffolk
Visit site
Another one to second this. I had a livery that could be a nightmare. Either wouldn't be caught or would run at you. We put her in a smaller paddock, and using a lunge whip pushed her on, and then did the 'join up' thing by turning our back on her. She would follow the person around after this. Every few weeks we would have to do it again. I am completely not a fan of the 'horsemanship' courses etc but this really does work.

we also used this method for my friends arab who just thought it was fun to stay out. we just kept her moving all of the time till she was so fed up she wanted to come in. worked a treat..
 

scrapster

Well-Known Member
Joined
26 December 2012
Messages
55
Visit site
My boy did this last year, but would turn to try and kick you. I got a behaviourist in and they did a bit of Natural Horseman ship with him. To be honest I thought it was a bit weird, when he ran off they kept him moving, each time he went to stop, the whacked the rope on the ground and wouldn't let him stop. Within a few minutes he walked over to us (they did do a bit of looking at him and peering round which Weird!) anyway if he ever walks off now, I just tap the rope on the floor, he turns looks at me and stands! It's amazing x
 

Ceriann

Well-Known Member
Joined
28 June 2012
Messages
2,519
Visit site
,
This is a controversial way of doing things, but if all other avenues have been exhausted I personally would leave her till last, and then try to catch her. If she isn't having it, go and get a lunge whip (this might require 2-3 of you if you have a large field, or half the field for a day or two) and if she runs, put the whip high above your head and keep her moving, herd her. Keep her running for a few minutes, then lower the whip so she knows you're not chasing her, and try to catch her. If she runs again, keep her moving again for a few minutes and don't let her stop. Repeat until she realises that coming in is the MUCH easier option.

I find it only takes 3-4 times of doing this and they're usually okay. All horses are individual though of course.

I've done this with mine - mine would also wind up her companion so I'd find it harder to catch her. It always worked eventually - the trick is to keep pushing her on until she fully gives in. I would rub her head and if she dropped it and was calm I'd halter her, if not I'd send her on again. I learnt if I didn't do that she would rear or be a pain to lead even if I'd caught her. I cried once I was so frustrated - I sympathise!
 

now_loves_mares

Well-Known Member
Joined
28 November 2007
Messages
2,553
Location
Edinburgh, Scotland
Visit site
This is a controversial way of doing things, but if all other avenues have been exhausted I personally would leave her till last, and then try to catch her. If she isn't having it, go and get a lunge whip (this might require 2-3 of you if you have a large field, or half the field for a day or two) and if she runs, put the whip high above your head and keep her moving, herd her. Keep her running for a few minutes, then lower the whip so she knows you're not chasing her, and try to catch her. If she runs again, keep her moving again for a few minutes and don't let her stop. Repeat until she realises that coming in is the MUCH easier option.

I find it only takes 3-4 times of doing this and they're usually okay. All horses are individual though of course.

I don't think it's controversial at all, and have used it successfully in the past. However, it doesn't work in my current field .It's very long and narrow. So you get the horse moving, it charges up the long 10 acres, eats grass for the 5 minutes it takes me to huff and puff back, then charges all the way back to the other end again. Actually it was my smart chestnut mare that did that. My current gelding is tricked every time by me feeding another horse. He's a bit stupid.

I had one lovely, very very clever event horse, who sometimes wouldn't catch. He'd float around you in a beautiful trot 20m circle; then one day I realised if I started talking to him as if I was lunging him I could get him to halt. Bless him.
 

ShadowHunter

Well-Known Member
Joined
11 July 2012
Messages
628
Location
North West, UK
Visit site
Mine can be like that. I get the anger and frustration of it all too. She does the usual, lets you get close then charge off to the other side of the field. She'll even sometimes let you put the head collar on and then tank off. Food usually works, she'll do ANYTHING for a mint *touches wood frantically*.
 

Tory27

Well-Known Member
Joined
28 March 2013
Messages
82
Visit site
Thanks all for the advice. I may try the ‘pushing her out idea'

Last night when I got home I went out to get them in, uncatchable horse took one look at me and started walking away. Here we go again..... I caught the others and she followed us all in on her own accord! I shut the gate and left her in the pen at the front of her stable. I rode my other horse first then when she was put away got head collar and went to get madam. Well, no! She was not going to be caught. Bearing in mind pen is not all that big approx 2 and a bit trot sides square so not a huge space. She would let me get so close swing her back end round nearly knocking me over and run around. This I thought has the potential to be a tad dangerous as there is concrete in front of the stables. So, after reading all you good peoples tricks yesterday I got the lunge line. I tied it to the fence and proceeded to box her into the corner. Oooo she didnt like that. Once she figured there was no way out she stood good as gold and let me put head collar on. Really horse, what is your problem?! Godknows what tonight will bring, a chair and a lunge whip I spect.....
 

Charmel

Well-Known Member
Joined
21 October 2013
Messages
163
Visit site
I have a 12.2 welsh pony that refuses to be caught in the field. I have had him 21 years and have always had a problem on every yard I have ever been on, worse in nice weather with lots of grass but still bad in bare field in the rain. Now I am on my own yard I get every other horse in first and then if I leave the gate open he will come in of his own accord and once through the gate will stand and let the tiniest tot put the headcollar on. . He is the boss in the field and I have tried everything else, join up, the lunge whip, treats, small paddock, headcollar with small string etc I was told by a behaviourist years ago that he feels under threat if he cannot move away quickly while held in the field as he is the alpha/boss so needs to control the herd at all times. We have taken over 4 hrs in the past but tried not to give up.
 
Top