If we were to get a dog...

Pearlsasinger

Well-Known Member
Joined
20 February 2009
Messages
35,651
Location
W. Yorks
I'm biased but would say a show Labrador might work well, you can get Labrador that are called dual-purpose. Normally means one show parent and one working but I don't personally agree with this type of breeding. They do shed a lot especially before winter and summer, but if you just give up and embrace it then its not so bad. No Labrador should be bred without knowing the parents and grandparents hip and elbow scores so that should give you confidence you won't get a badly bred one.
Labs always used to be dual purpose dogs. I deplore the separation of the 2 types, this is what happens when dogs are bred for particular characteristics, ignoring the other traits that makes them a 'whole' dog. Show dogs should be able to retrieve and not over-sized and have a bit of spark in their character, while working-bred dogs should be capable of being pets and meet breed standards, otherwise you end up with 2 completely different dogs.

ETA, our Labs always had dual chanpions in their pedigrees, nothing to do with one show and one working parent!
 
Last edited:

Apercrumbie

Well-Known Member
Joined
3 November 2008
Messages
4,645
Location
South-West
Another vote for a terrier - we currently have Irish Terriers and they're brilliant fun. They play lots, ADORE children and are very tolerant. Full of character too thanks to the terrier part. A smaller option would be a Border Terrier/similar perhaps?

Otherwise, a golden retriever would be great too if you can cope with the shedding.
 

splashgirl45

Well-Known Member
Joined
6 March 2010
Messages
10,679
Location
suffolk
Not a German wire haired!!

Lovely temperament but hard work. Needs a job and lots of mental stimulation. Can't imagine them doing well in a home where they aren't worked 😬
a friend has got one and he is a great dog, very obedient, she does do a bit of agility but hes not worked and gets on great with her daughter as well, perhaps he is a one off..
 

TPO

Well-Known Member
Joined
20 November 2008
Messages
6,631
Location
A ray of sunshine 🌞
a friend has got one and he is a great dog, very obedient, she does do a bit of agility but hes not worked and gets on great with her daughter as well, perhaps he is a one off..
They are very one person dogs and (often) have separation issues.

Very clever and quick learners, great with kids and other dogs but don't seem to be aware of their own size! The more they do the fitter they get the more exercise they need... definitely need something to occupy their brain too. Sooky big cuddly lumps in my experience too

I just don't think one fits the remit of the OP
 

palo1

Well-Known Member
Joined
27 July 2012
Messages
3,081

palo1

Well-Known Member
Joined
27 July 2012
Messages
3,081
Another vote for a terrier - we currently have Irish Terriers and they're brilliant fun. They play lots, ADORE children and are very tolerant. Full of character too thanks to the terrier part. A smaller option would be a Border Terrier/similar perhaps?

Otherwise, a golden retriever would be great too if you can cope with the shedding.
My Irish terrier is the best dog I have ever had :) :) Wonderful, wonderful dogs!
 

MinKo

Well-Known Member
Joined
9 August 2021
Messages
145
Havanese
Rhodesian Ridgeback
Lagotto Romangnolo
Portugese Water Dog
My sister has a Portuguese Water dog and a Lagotto Romangnolo. Both are high energy but easy to train and very loving in nature. Her kids are 14, 11 and 9. All the kids are into running and football with my sister and the dogs go too, my nephew has also taught them to play football with him 🤣. The only down side is when they see even a puddle, they are in it. They get on really well with my small dogs too.
 

TGM

Well-Known Member
Joined
3 April 2003
Messages
15,960
Location
South East
I definitely tend to think a dog looks miserable if it is tucked up with its tail rammed between its legs. (Every whippet ever seen at an outdoor event). I’ve never owned one though so I will try to think they are happy really, just not expressing it very well. 🙂
I think it is the canine equivalent of 'resting bitch face' in whippets! And a 'definite tuck up' is actually part of the breed standard! But if you are talking about whippets at outdoor events then I suspect they were cold. Whilst mine is happy to go for an active walk in cooler temperatures, with a coat if really cold, I don't think she would be happy hanging around at an outdoor event when it is cooler. Which is why I said in my earlier post that I'm not sure whether a whippet would suit their weekend activities. An active walk to and from the coffee shop would be fine (and a perfect dog to bring to a coffee shop, normally being clean, compact and calm). But hanging around watching children play football in winter or a chilly day spectating at the local point-to-point would not be an enjoyable day for most whippets. Mine would definitely prefer being left at home with the heating on and a blanket!
 

DressageCob

Well-Known Member
Joined
30 December 2011
Messages
1,440
It's an incredibly broad range of dogs you are looking at, from newfoundlands to toy poodles!

I'm going to suggest an Airedale terrier. They aren't too "terrier-y", enjoy being part of the family but can equally cope on their own, not overly loud, non-shedding (if stripped rather than clipped), will happily spend all day out exploring or sitting by a fire at home. Lovely dogs.
 
Joined
3 May 2007
Messages
15,264
Location
Weathertop
I have a working bred golden, he really doesnt shed much, not slobbery. I know people think they are easy to train but he's taken a lot of hard work to impress some sort of impulse control in him but he always tries very hard. Likes to cuddle, is always happy and up for anything. Topped out at 35kg and he's tall. Can't imagine not ever having a goldie face to smush at every available opportunity. Great with kids, loves a ball (more than life) and chest rubs. Not loud without good reason. Thinks the smooth is an idiot.

Smooth collie-perfect size (24kg) as much or as little energy as you want. folds up very small for storage. will cani cross, amazing frisbee catcher, athletic but not always aware of what his body is doing-I know others do agility with them but it doesnt interest me other than basic commands and stuff in the garden. Smart but a bit collie wierd. Cast iron digestion. Sheds all.the.time no dribbling, superb with very young kids/stepdaughter with special needs and learning disabilities and old folk. Can be quite hard to find, sometimes a little fond of his own voice (collie!) but cracking family dog imho. Thinks the golden is an idiot.
 

EventingMum

Well-Known Member
Joined
9 September 2010
Messages
5,063
Location
The Wet West of Scotland
I am no canine expert compared with many posters, also I'm a huge terrier fan but adored my labrador growing up too, as an only child he was my best friend!.

I know someone with a rescue whippet and he is wonderful, great with children etc but does require coats in winter, often a fleece under a waterproof one. Also, I met a Norfolk Terrier who was amazing and would fit your brief OP. It sounds morbid but I would be wary of getting anything with a potential shortish life span such as some large breeds when you have such a young family. Losing a pet is hard at any time and obviously, things can happen to any dog but if you got something with a potentially longer lifespan your children would hopefully be older before having to say goodbye.
 

buddylove

Well-Known Member
Joined
12 January 2011
Messages
1,727
Location
Shropshire
Labradors are a great family dog. Ours is working bred but will take it or leave it to be honest. Happiest chasing a ball, the kids pop her over jumps in the field. Absolutely loves being involved in day to day life, from activities with the kids to playing with the Tesco delivery driver, or just having a cuddle.
I generally find them to be a calming influence on a household, especially when the other dogs in the household are a terrier and three dachshunds (do not fit the bill, super barky)!
 
Joined
6 July 2010
Messages
28,262
What did I read recently about kidney issues and goldens? Or am I dreaming?

I would cross any giant dog off the list: they don’t live long (although there’s no guarantees there as we found out recently) and the sheer size=equivalent mess. I do not know if their joints would cope with hours of walks?

Never thought I’d say this, but my cousin (3 kids and one due in a fortnight) recently got a goldendoodle. The breeder spoke to her a lot, facetimed, drove the dog half way for her, chose the ‘lively’ one based on the daily activities etc. He’s going to be a big lad but hasn’t shed yet.
 

paddy555

Well-Known Member
Joined
23 December 2010
Messages
7,794
a wire coated vizsla. I saw my first ones at the week end and was very taken. 2 adults and one pup all playing with young kids. All were running loose but very well behaved.
 
Top