I'm torn between clydesdale or RID - your views please.

cblover

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Hi folks, I know they may seem worlds apart but I like qualities in them both.

I'm not sure if buying another clydesdale is my way of trying to replace Mez. You know...are all clydesdales gonna be just like her?? I think not. Lol

I really like pure draughts too, but have less experience of them although I have asked about them on here before and got fab opinions on them. They are clearly popular and I'm looking for a weight caring, calm and collected family friend. Nothing too flash but a solid alrounder.

I'm hoping you can help.....most important thing is having a calm and laid back attitude to life, solid and steady, not too big, be a leisure horse that fits in with family life and is not in the least big sharp or silly.

Opinions please? Thank you muchly.
 

PorkChop

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I think a good example of either breed would do the job you want, but I would expect an ID to be lighter on its feet :)

I would go and find good examples of both, view and then make a decision.
 

Honey08

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Don't go for a particular breed, go for a type, which includes both these breeds. Then decide because it's the right horse, not the right breed.
 

ycbm

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I just don't think you can beat the Clydie looks if you get one with white legs and face. Irish Draught are great horses, but much more 'ordinary' to look at, and I do like a horse that grabs the eye.
 

YorksG

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Pick your ID with care, we had one who wasn't the calmest horse and have a friend with one who is fine if out with her field companion, but dire if out on her own. That said, one of calmest, nicest natured horses I ever met was ID. The two that were nervy were grey, the stoic chesnut. What about other heavy breeds, sister has a Westphalian Draught mare who has a wonderful personality, and is as safe as houses.
 

VikingSong

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Tough one, they're both fantastic breeds. I can only suggest that when you're viewing horses, buy the horse that is most suitable for you and who you have "clicked with" regardless of whether the horse is an RID or Clydie.

We always think the grass is greener on the other side of the fence. In most cases it's not.

Happy horse hunting and good luck. x
 
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Purely money wise, surely an ID will be cheaper for shoeing, feed, tack? Go to a known expert for whatever you get, IDs aren't always calm and lovely, the one that did my leg can be a right mareish swine!
 

elsielouise

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Pick your ID with care, we had one who wasn't the calmest horse and have a friend with one who is fine if out with her field companion, but dire if out on her own. That said, one of calmest, nicest natured horses I ever met was ID. The two that were nervy were grey, the stoic chesnut. What about other heavy breeds, sister has a Westphalian Draught mare who has a wonderful personality, and is as safe as houses.

May I suggest without prejudice that you simply pick your ID breeder and line with care.

Fantastic breed. Fantastic knowledgable breeders knowing their stuff vist this site.

Nothing else to add. Read some threads here and you will see.
 

spacefaer

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I know very little about clydesdales, except that as a cross with a TB, the progeny has produced brilliant jumpers.

If you go down the ID route, look at the bloodlines - some are sharper than others.

We have 2 rising 6 yr olds, both similar size and with similar upbringings. One is forward, powerful, opinionated and trainable - he's going to make a fabulous performance hunter, who will jump a big hedge, in time. The other is mellow, laid back, bright but chooses to use his energy sparingly. We're going to be selling the laid back one as he's too polite for us - look out for Sir Rivie or Fast Silver bloodlines in a RID for really nice temperaments.
 

Orca

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I know very little about clydesdales, except that as a cross with a TB, the progeny has produced brilliant jumpers.

If you go down the ID route, look at the bloodlines - some are sharper than others.

We have 2 rising 6 yr olds, both similar size and with similar upbringings. One is forward, powerful, opinionated and trainable - he's going to make a fabulous performance hunter, who will jump a big hedge, in time. The other is mellow, laid back, bright but chooses to use his energy sparingly. We're going to be selling the laid back one as he's too polite for us - look out for Sir Rivie or Fast Silver bloodlines in a RID for really nice temperaments.
This is true to my experience of IDs. Two of ours were like chalk and cheese! I'd opt for the right RID over a Clydie. I prefer them to ride :)
 

VikingSong

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Purely money wise, surely an ID will be cheaper for shoeing, feed, tack? Go to a known expert for whatever you get, IDs aren't always calm and lovely, the one that did my leg can be a right mareish swine!
That's a good point. There are quite a few farriers who refuse to shoe draught breeds due to their size. They say it strains their backs. At least with an RID, OP, you shouldn't have any problems with farriers.
 
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Tern

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That's a good point. There are quite a few farriers who refuse to shoe draught breeds due to their size. They say it strains their backs. At least with an RID, OP, you shouldn't have any problems with farriers.
My Farrier LOVES shoeing mine! Well.. he's barefoot but he loves doing him. Says it's because they have such fantastic feet. My lad goes about 9 weeks without issue.
 

Honey08

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My Farrier LOVES shoeing mine! Well.. he's barefoot but he loves doing him. Says it's because they have such fantastic feet. My lad goes about 9 weeks without issue.
But surely he's very different to a Clydesdale if he's crossed with a TB? So wouldn't be as heavy for the farrier.. I imagine that's a nice cross.

My friend has two Clydesdales. They're not my cup of tea, it's like they're in slow motion, my mare gets so annoyed hacking with them and having to check all the time, plus the feathers would drive me mad. However, they've both done everything at local level, from dressage to eventing and given their owner lots of confidence and fun. One even did a BE90, went clear but clocked up hundreds of time faults!
 

VikingSong

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My Farrier LOVES shoeing mine! Well.. he's barefoot but he loves doing him. Says it's because they have such fantastic feet. My lad goes about 9 weeks without issue.

That's great to read because I adore Clydies and would love to own one, but have always been put off the idea by other Clydie owners who said they had troubles finding a farrier willing to shoe them.
 

Tern

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But surely he's very different to a Clydesdale if he's crossed with a TB? So wouldn't be as heavy for the farrier.. I imagine that's a nice cross.

My friend has two Clydesdales. They're not my cup of tea, it's like they're in slow motion, my mare gets so annoyed hacking with them and having to check all the time, plus the feathers would drive me mad. However, they've both done everything at local level, from dressage to eventing and given their owner lots of confidence and fun. One even did a BE90, went clear but clocked up hundreds of time faults!
He's still very heavy for a cross with TB. The feather has been minimised a lot but still has the movement of a clydesdale with added lightness.
Although I work him at Novice level he is trained to about Elementary level and would easily do it with a dressage rider.
And feet wise - if he wants to balance on you, he will. :D
 

Honey08

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My friends Clyde did affiliated dressage, got to 100 points. Used to be great seeing him warm up amid the posh warmbloods!

Ps, I can't ever remember her having trouble finding a farrier.
 

VikingSong

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Ps, I can't ever remember her having trouble finding a farrier.

That's good your friend had no trouble finding a farrier; the people I've spoken to did. I guess willingness to shoe draughts varies from one farrier to another? I worked at a horse sanctuary in my youth and their farrier *would* trim the heavies, but my god would he grumble lol!
 

Tnavas

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less hair/pig oil/mites with an ID. And arguably better confirmation for a long term ridden career.
A good Clydesdale has excellent confOrmation for riding - and if kept fit will have a long life. They have a lovely sloping shoulder and a good length of neck.

OP Be aware that if the horse is over 16.2 there is a likelihood of it being crossed with a shire in the not too distant past - for some crazy reason Clydes were crossed with Shires for increased height and visa versa for better feather.

A good Clydesdale is agile and covers the ground, has an excellent trot and a comfy canter. With well cared for feet they don't have massive dinner plate feet and when I have a cover on my girl its an off the peg from the local saddlery store - With some I have had to get the closure straps on the neck rug lengthened. She fits in a Warmblood bridle.

A quality Clydesdale head


In the ring at the NZ Horse of the Year - she came 3rd in Ridden Clydesdale


Mine is a classic Clydesdale bred from old working stock - due to our isolation New Zealand has some of the purest bred Clydesdales.
 

spacefaer

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Tnavas - your horse is lovely - so much more suitable for riding than some of the clydesdales I've seen in the UK, which seem to be very leggy and that grim strawberry roan colour.
 

Tnavas

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Tnavas - your horse is lovely - so much more suitable for riding than some of the clydesdales I've seen in the UK, which seem to be very leggy and that grim strawberry roan colour.
Thank you - she is my pride and joy, I love her to bits, it was love at first sight, I bought her when she was just 6mths old - she'll be 13 this year. She is what they should look like, being a mare she is smaller and more feminine - she's smack on 16hh. They were never supposed to be giants but a poorer farmers working horse, cheaper to feed, suitable to plow fields, take stock to market, the family to church and carry the farmer out hunting. A versatile working horse.
 
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alainax

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Pick your ID with care, we had one who wasn't the calmest horse
If you go down the ID route, look at the bloodlines - some are sharper than others.
This, I am sure there will be many more sharp ID's than clydies out there, so do pick with care. I had one who was nuclear hot! However there are so many wonderful ones out there, just about picking the right one.

If you are looking for laid back, safe and steady, and dont need to rev it up a bit, I would think the colder blooded of the two might be more suitable - of course every horse is so different.
 

ILuvCowparsely

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Hi folks, I know they may seem worlds apart but I like qualities in them both.

I'm not sure if buying another clydesdale is my way of trying to replace Mez. You know...are all clydesdales gonna be just like her?? I think not. Lol

I really like pure draughts too, but have less experience of them although I have asked about them on here before and got fab opinions on them. They are clearly popular and I'm looking for a weight caring, calm and collected family friend. Nothing too flash but a solid alrounder.

I'm hoping you can help.....most important thing is having a calm and laid back attitude to life, solid and steady, not too big, be a leisure horse that fits in with family life and is not in the least big sharp or silly.

Opinions please? Thank you muchly.
I would go for a RID every time.
 

ElliePippa

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I know it's not one of your options, but we once had a shire X TB and he was without doubt the nicest, most genuine, gentle , honest horse I'd ever met. View the types you like the look of, but go for temperament every time- not all heavy breeds are as steady and sweet as others.
 

cblover

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Thanks everyone, really appreciate it. I'm not findng many to consider at all, either the type I'm after or a specific breed. I'll keep looking though...early says. Can anyone recommend good sites to look on?
 
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