Insurance and vets visits etc............

WishfulThinker

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OK, Now do you have to declare every illness/ailment that your horse has received treatment for to your insurers?

As presumably they will if you ever need to claim, see the horses vet records and may refuse to pay out if the horse has had a similar illness before and you haven't declared it. Is that correct?

I am not a negligent owner, but, I do think that some ailments do not require a vet - or at least when on the very low/mild end of the scale they don't- its a waste of time and money.
I am just wondering, as what if a horse is at a yard where they are OTT with vets call outs - in that they call the vet before you, even for small things that dont need a vets call out.

My horse, last year managed to do various things that prompted vets visits. The first was a nail in foot, it was not even 1/2 cm and about 3mm into the frog - horse did not feel it, was not lame and didnt care about nail being removed - in fact I have removed larger stones from his frog. But the yard called the vet - so it is on his record as he had a nail in foot and pouticing etc etc.
This I do NOT view as a better safe than sorry visit - this I view as un needed and a waste of time. I was also a bit riled as to get to out fields you had to go past a building site for the YO new house - so the likelyhood of nail being picked up there was high - it was a building nail, not a farrier one. And after this insident they changed the routes to the field.

2nd was mild colic. Caused by him (against my orders!!) being put into a lush paddock from what was almost a starvation paddock - I know the dangers of good doers and laminitus etc and so was erring on the side of caution. All the other horses also had mild tummy upset and gurgles...........but they didnt have the vet out. He was fine after 3 hours, and yes it is better to be safe than sorry, but they described his behaviour and to be honest if it had been me dealing with him I wouldnt have called the vet, but I would have walked him about and monitored him.
So now he has Colic on his record - he has never had any upset since.

During the foot visit a caugh was picked up and he was treated as having a respitory illness and on ventipulmin - which did sod all, but I had my suspicions about the cause of the difficulties and so told vet he was better - it was to an extent, especailly if he was kept in. It was the butter cups.
We moved a month or 2 later and he never cughed again.

Now, I know we do have to be vigilant, and give our horses the best care............but I am of the school of wait and see with minor ailments. So I would not have - if asked - had the vet out for these issues. However he was under the care of a sharer at the time, and also the yard rules are that if the owner isnt there the vet is called - even BEFORE the owner is called, so you have no say.

So................I havent told my insurance - and as he is on loan theloanee has not told the insurers about these ailments as I feel that they were things caused by the environment he was in and he will not be in a similar one again. Dont get me wrong, the yard is brilliant, it just didnt agree with him one little bit.

Am I bad for not telling them? I have paid out almost £350 in fees for these combined things/visits - so wouldn't have even gotten ££ from insurance as had £400 excess.
 

CrazyMare

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No, we have only told the insurance company about major things, or if something looks to have teh potential to become major - i.e. damaged tendon sheath. I didn't call them about the gunky eye that was flushed because it was probably down to the wind. It cost me around £45 in drugs and treatment as I took her in.
 

f_s_

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I don't tell the insurers about minor ailments, only major ones.

I also agree about all the unnecessary vets visits!!! When I was at livery (a very long time ago) I was amazed at the amount of times vets were called out for issues that common sense could have solved! I think this was down to either lack of experience, lack of confidence, or just a bit of drama queen and attention grabbing action.

I realise that better to be safe than sorry does apply, but, a cut that just needed cleaning is a bit much!!!!
 

Passtheshampoo

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Having had horses for 30 odd years there have been lots of times when a horse has been lame or had a snotty nose or cough but were still racing round, eating etc. In these instances I have always used the wait and see approach. Other times I've had a lame horse or a horse that's just looked poorly and I will contact the vet straight away. On the times a vet is called out (which is rare) I do usually put in a claim to my insurers as that's what it's there for. Quite a lot of friends don't claim on their insurance unless the bill reaches a few hundred but still stay on a policy where the excess is only £120!! I have a youngster that has just had the vet out for sarcoids. I've put a claim in to the insurers and so if that's excluded in future years hopefully the initial treatment will sort them and if not I'll have to try "cheaper" holistic remedies if they return in the future and I'm not covered.
 

Hippona

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I'm a wait and see person usually - as you say, common sense and all that. For the things which needed vets treatment...ie I knew what was needed but couldnt go out and get it cos its prescription only and an acute one off...then no, I dont tell the insurance company. I've only ever claimed for a broken leg.
 

WishfulThinker

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Phew, I did worry that maybe I was a bad owner and underreacting. He did onve have a nose bleed for a few days, was only ever a wee bit, from 1 nostril and only when stabled. Folk kept telling me to get the vet but he was in very fine fettle, in fact - he was too full of himself. Turned out it was barley spavins in the straw and it was gone when we got a new bale.

And he once had mild choke - I massaged his neck and walked him round for about 20 mins. He had no nasal discharge, no sweating and was still trying to eat - f however it had gone on past 30 mins I would have called the vet, but a few big rubs/punches to the throat disloged it and he was fine.
 

eggs

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Unfortunately you will probably need to check your insurance policy re notifiying them about vet visits.

Some policies do state that any medical attention has to be notified, others don't seem to be so insistent.

However, I am with you on adopting a sensible wait and see policy. My vet is quite happy for me to speak to her and get advice over the phone before getting her to come out if I don't think a visit is essential.
 

TequilaMist

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Totally agree with you about the waitng.And I don't inform insurance co of every lameness,cough etc only ones that amount to something.
BUT saying that think it may/may not cause a prob for future claims depending on wording of claim form part for vets and your vet .A past mare of mine had a pile of ongoing claims for hindleg lameness and noticed on vets part a question something like 'Has the horse been treated for this ailment/illness before?'Don't know if they still do that or similiar as haven't needed to claim for yrs(touch wood,fingers x)
But personally would just do what you are doing
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Was honest about a past lameness ,no claim, turned out to be an abcess.They excluded BOTH front legs was an awful palaver to get them back on policy
 

SpottedCat

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Most insurance policies require that you inform them of any 'non-routine' vet visits. This is basically everything except vaccinations and teeth being rasped.

If you do not, then should the insurers request a full history from your vets and discover something on there that they were not informed about, then your policy is null and void and even if the condition you are claiming for is unrelated they are within their rights not to pay out.

It amazes me that so many people, every time this comes up, do not know this and have not bothered to read their policy documents properly.

So the likelihood is that they should have been informed at the time of the vet call out, yes - read your policy very carefully. This is why I never understand people who don't claim even if something is over their excess!
 

WishfulThinker

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He's never had anything that I would have deemed as vet worthy in the 4 years i had owned him up till that point, and none in the past years with previous owners. Typical hardy cob.
Probably doesn't help that he has had 3 different names since he came to Britain.

I am beginning to wish I had never moved him to that yard..........seems no end of trouble that will follow me!
frown.gif
 

ladyt25

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A genuine insurance company are intelligent enough to know what ailments are serious and what aren't. Therefore the advice is to tell them anything that you consider may affect cover.

A case of mild colic that was resolved with minimal or no veterinary treatment, and when a cause for the episode is known should not be seen as a major issue. It's about common sense though at the end of the day.
 

loopylucifer

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I completely agree and never told my insures about 'minnor' things but last year they asked for full clinical history and now have a very extensive exclution list and have just put in claim form for the other one and on it its states that full clinical history is required and that the vets haveto supply this. thankfully there has not benn anythingelse with this one. but i think theyare getting much hotter on this as when mentiond to vet about something the other day said wouldn't write it on notes as then if it goes away the insurance company wont know!! So yes you should inform them of EVERYTHING how ever minor it is.
 
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