Is there life after Chronic Laminitis

shell1978

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Please please help, I really need to hear success stories of horses that have fully recovered from Chronic Laminitis.

I am totally gutted at the moment as my horse had a acute attack back in June, had a recent x-ray done yesterday and her pedal bone has rotated & sunk slightly. (Still awaiting extract degree of rotation).

I just hope to god that I will be able to ride her again. I dont care about jumping or competing again.......i just want my horse back
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kizzywiz

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YES!!! My Welsh sec C has some rotation of the pedal bone in her left fore, she has had one bout since when I removed her grazing muzzle in the winter, she is sound & competes succesfully at elementary level dressage, hacks & jumps a little bit on a surface for fun. She is 18 now & has had many other problems, so I do look after her with the ground conditions, but with careful management, yes you can have a success story.
 

Eaglestone

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Yes .... my Cushings boy's rotated 10 degrees in October 2005 and he is going well now, just have to keep an eye out for Laminitis .... he is still be ridden but he is getting old now though
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misstar

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My little section A got mild lami back at the start of the summer. Recovered, then had another attack of it caused by stress from being stabled on her own. Had x rays done and there is a slight rotation which is being corrected by trimming. She has now been of bute for 3 days and still sound. Fingers x she will stay sound.
 

aileenmcdonnell

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My little shetland type pony suffered from bouts once a yr for 2yrs then July07-Jan08 had cronic laminitis, I was at my wits ends and was getting to the stage where my vet suggested putting her to sleep and my farrier said he had seen worse cases her pedal bone had rotated&sunk. I know each case is different but she has improved so much and is back to my 4yr old niece riding her barefoot. I found when she had attack I called the vet & farrier and they would shoe her rising her front feet after the shoeing she always got worse before getting better and was very distressing and traumatic for her. In Jan 08 I got the farrier to remove her shoes and cut back her front toes which left them open but all the infection was able to seep out. Every 4weeks he comes back and dresses her feet and on saturday he said they were perfect again. Her routine is now I soak her hay 12hrs in advance she gets this in the morning and then is let out to the bare field and comes in again in the evening and gets the same again. My mistake was thinking my only letting her onto grass for 30mins on a empty stomach she would be less bored and not eat enought to do damage but I was wrong. I have learned so much this year & all the hard way. My aim was to have her pain free but she has excelled this so dont give up &Good luck!
 

mystiandsunny

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My horse has really bad insulin resistance, so even 1/2 hour of grass, or a haynet of unsoaked hay will bring on an attack. She had recurrent attacks every few months until we sorted out a diet she is ok on, and although it took a long time for her to come totally sound, she is now. On her current diet you'd never know there was anything wrong with her, and she is safe from the recurrent attacks she used to have.
 

brighteyes

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Yes! It can be a very long road and varies from case to case. Once an attack is fully over, the hoof re-stabilises and as long as no further attacks hinder the process, the hoof will fully re-grow in about 12 months and your horse should become paddock sound at least. Busy yourself with research and management and with the help of your vet and farrier, work out the bare bones of a plan - be prepared to adjust if required- and don't rush any stage of the healing process.

Good luck and chin up!
 

rizzlebag100

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we have the problem also, a BIG factor is loads of 'loose' shavings, should be like walking on a matteress ,and will also keep the feet dry ,well worth the expense.
 
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