Laminitis recovery?

Dogstar

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My mare had laminitis for the first time on 24th May (overweight and didn't fence the field down in time). Only 'slight rotation' apparently, but not good feet. She has been box rested since, fed on soaked hay, hifi lite and farriers formula. She is now being turned out in a 'micro paddock' for several hours a day. My wonderful vet seems really pleased with her and said to get her trimmed again at the end of this month as a precaution then shod next time the farrier comes (which will be 5 weeks after that; brilliant caring farrier btw) and then start riding her. However, I am still very worried about her, particularly the 'what if' she is not right when I do ride her. Obviously, I would get the vet out again; but would this mean 'the end' or just more rest etc? And how will I know whether she can go back to her previous work? I know my friend's horse took a year to recover. Any help appreciated, thanks. Also, commiserations to everyone whose horses have had laminitis this year, what an upsetting experience. I have been so angry and fed up with myself about it and had some sleepless nights.
 

Eaglestone

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Just take everything very very slowly and do not expect too much too soon .... other than that I would go into a whole volume of advice .....
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angiebaby

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There is no reason why your mare should not go back to what she was doing before. If she is sound on hard ground turning a circle without any painkillers, then thats good news!

When you have her shod, get the vet out to trot her up, he should be able to advise from there.

Mine had it three years ago and is now fitter, slimmer and more bonkers than before! Its hard work, but very rewarding.
 

Dogstar

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That is very reassuring to hear about your horse. I am so glad it all came right for you. My mare wasn't right when turning on the concrete last time we tried but seems totally comfortable in the hard paddock, so I guess I will just have to be patient and keep my fingers crossed. Thanks for your comments, they are appreciated.
 

bensababy

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QR it sounds like you are doing the right thing, your vet and farrier will be able to advise you when it will be ok to turn out/exercise etc. My advise would be to not rush things.. it is a long drawn out illness (been there, done it).
And in future i would def recommend muzzling. And try and keep the weight off.
I found with mine, he was out for a year also that i almost had to go back to the beginning with him - he had lost alot of muscle tone and needed bringing back slowly - mainly long reining. And very little road work.

Good luck, you have my sympathies
 

Dogstar

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Thanks for your kind words. I am so glad your horse recovered. Can you do normal road work now, or just cautiously? I will certainly make sure Ellie stays slim from now on, which won't please her as she lives for food! She will have to be kept either in the tiny paddock or, as you say, muzzled, because she pulls up electric fence posts and escapes! The weight had gradually crept on until I just thought it was how she was meant to be, plus I had a few really bad weeks in May where I 'took my eyes off the ball.' The fields are riddled with red clover this time which can't have helped. But I can see she is a good healthy weight now (albeit with the loss of tone you mentioned) and am hoping that we will be given another chance. Many thanks again.
 

brighteyes

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Time, stable management, time, vet's advice, time, farrier attention, time (spotted a theme here?) research, time, more research, time and grazing muzzles - oh, and plenty of time (did I mention that?
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Fingers crossed for a smooth recovery x
 

bensababy

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Yes hes back on normal road work - however he doesnt ever do hard road work eg - alot of trotting - but thats just me being over cautious with him.

You just have to remember now she has it - she will be more prone to it again, you need to take precautions and watch the weight.
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kazza28

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Hi
i am new to all this but i have been reading all your messags over the last couple of weeks and i wondered if anyone could help me. I have a new forest pony who last year got laminitis very mildly, so this year i was carefull only let her have a small amount of grazing and kept her weight down. She had a feet done in beginning of july and it brought on laminitis she has been very poorly and my vet also now thinks she has metabolic sydrome.
So for the two weeks she has been on bute and in her stable she has her hay soaked for 15 hours. She came off the bute
last week, but the vet told me to keep her in for another four weeks with the odd walk to see how she is doing. i took her out her stable today to do her bed and she seems bad again. this is so upsetting to see as ive done everything the vet has adviced we seem to go 1 step forward then 2 steps back. is this comman with laminitis?
many thanks
 

angiebaby

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I would advise against taking her out of the stable at all, even to muck out, Laminitis is very painful for them without a soft cushioning; ie a deep shavings bed. Mine was in for 30 days after he was sound without painkillers.

I hope she makes a full recovery, it is a slow process, but time and patience really is a vertue!
 

kazza28

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Thank you for advice!!!
Yes i know ive got to be patient but i just want her better dont like seeing her in pain! Is it common for her to have good and bad days!!!
 

Dogstar

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From what I have read on the forum, it does seem to happen this way; but I would definitely get the vet out again anyway if only for your peace of mind! Sorry to hear you are going through it too, especially as you were being so careful. Thanks again for all the advice everyone has so kindly posted.
 

Flame_

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[ QUOTE ]
ive done everything the vet has adviced we seem to go 1 step forward then 2 steps back. is this comman with laminitis?


[/ QUOTE ]
Yep, afraid so. Its a long road and a constant balancing act getting them right after a lami attack. Speak to your vet about maybe incresing the bute again, if any other medication can help and what you should be doing management wise since the pony's deteriorated a bit. It also might be worth testing the pony for cushings if you've not already, since she got lami in spite of your careful management. But don't worry, it can take a really long time and they can sometimes get worse and then go on to get better.
smile.gif
 

kazza28

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Thank you i feel abit better knowing that it can be common to have good and bad days! My vet seems to think that she has metobolic sydrome which isnt helping but i have cut all her sugar out totaly.
How long can these attacks go on for any idea?
 

Flame_

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How long's a piece of string?
wink.gif


I've got one that providing he only has a minor attack he's normally right as rain in two weeks to a month. I've got another that had an attack last Christmas which continued for nearly three months until he went on pergolide and started improving. He's still not 100% sound eight months on. My friend has a mare who has finally come totally right eighteen months after the attack. Some never go back to the horse/pony they were before. I think a lot depends on how ill the horse is with the attack and how long it is in that poorly stage for. If you get the illness under control quickly you have the best chance of the damage to the feet recovering. The changes within the feet can take months to settle down though.
 

rizzlebag100

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kazza looks like u have taken over the post , well we have a 12hhwelsh pony first diagnosed with lami 2 years ago ,18months ago pedal bone rotation then suspected cussions and metabolic syndrome , i posted on here about 4 months ago because we were going to have him PTS.because the viscious circle had began, which is no excersise because of pedal bone rotation ,but also needs excersise to reduce sugar levels ,and a crippled pony , after over a year of intense vet/xray/farrier treatment,still to no avail we decided to give him 1 last chance, this is what we have done,firstly we went and bought 10 bales of shavings and spread them all in his stable ,which made it like walking on a matteress, and also keeps his feet dry,weighed his feed (to little is as bad as to much)and hay (soaked for 10-12 hrs)fortunatly we live near the beach so we took him in the sea every day for 2 weeks solid ,tested for cussions disease (negative)and blood test for metabolic,(positive),he has been kept in apart from mucking out time and going to the beach,today the results of our intensive care and time are unbelievable,such a change much happier pony we now are able to exercise him morning and night we drive around the field with him on long lead reign,his feet are nice and hard ,even the vet cannot believe the change , i has been a long few months and now we have to introduce grazing into the equasion again .so dont despair hope this has encouraged you..
 

kazza28

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Rio2203 thank you so much it really does help to read what people have to say, and it helps to hear that you can get over this. I have the same problem as you can not excersise becasue of the feet but need to keep the sugar level down.. its just so hard when you think they are doing well and then have a relaps.
Since my last post she has perked up in herself and being quiet checky. She hasnt stepped outside her stable. She still has abit of warmth in her front feet but as people keep telling me i think ive got a long way to go yet.
many thanks for advice.....
 
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