Laminitis Still!!!!!

emc1

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Can anyone help? we have a pony with laminitis, he's been in since March this year with only small visits to a bare paddock - he has had no grass for a week now but I have a problem in what to feed him, i can only get hold of last years hay that is rich is ryegrass and has obviously been fertilised as he cant walk the day after he has some, this years hay that has not been fetilised has the same effect. I have been feeding him Hifi lite as a hay replacer but he doesnt relaly like it. Hes having a small feed of pony nuts twice a day. he was x rayed last week and there is very little rotation so far - BUT he is still really really bad, he's on 2 bute a day and can still barely walk - does anyone have any suggestions as to what I can feed him???? I feel so sorry for him and am sure he's not getting enough to eat despite the ad lib hifi lite. He looks hungry to me
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He is on shavings, he's 8 yrs old and is a welshy. Any suggestions gratefully received!
 

sojeph

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If you soak the hay overnight there should be nothing in there to cause problems. I wouldn't feed him the pony nuts but just stick with the hay.
 

TGM

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Definitely try him with Spiller's Happy Hoof - much more appetisting than HiFi Lite and still Laminitis Trust approved. Alternatively you could get hold of some Marksway HorseHage - the high fibre and timothy versions are recommended for laminitics.
 

brighteyes

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God. Poor you and poor pony. How long is a piece of string is the question with laminitis. What caused it initially and what does your vet have to say? Have they no suggestions? Have you tried frog supports?

There are some good websites to look at; try www.laminitisclinic.org and www.laminitis.org for starters. There's a very slight chance your pony may have developed Cushing's, in which case www.laminitisandcushings.com is worth a look, and there's also the possibility he is having problems with his insulin. Do keep us posted and I hope you find an answer very soon. Apologies if there's too much info and you are already up to speed on his laminitis!

Good luck.
 

MagicMelon

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Id chuck him outside especially if he's been in since March. If possible, tape off a small section outside his stable so he can choose whether to go into the stable on his soft shavings or stand about outside. It makes them so much happier to be outside, especially natives. Moving about helps lami's get the blood going round their hooves which you need. It really perked up my boy when he had it as he got extremely depressed at being kept in (and obviously stress can trigger it too!). Id try to keep him amused too via food - like those balls which they push about releasing tiny bits of food (you could put fibre nuts in them or something).

I would go out of my way to find shittier hay as that is really all he gets to eat! Or maybe feed that hosehage stuff? I think one of them is ok for laminitics: http://www.horsehage.co.uk/2005/HoofKind.html

There's other lami friendly feeds like Safe & Sound, Dengie Good Doer, Happy Hoof, High Fibre Nuts (Spillers, Badminton etc. all do their own). Im not sure what your "pony nuts" are, I assume usual horse & pony nuts which I personally wouldn't feed. Just make sure what you feed has the laminitis trust approved stamp on it!

I would speak to your vet and farrier about what they advise right now.
 

mrsbloggett

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My NF mare, Maisie, is recovering from lami at the moment (she went v lame 9 weeks ago)
She has rotation of the pedal bone in her front left hoof. Has your vet and farrier got together to discuss treatment? Although Maisies pedal bone is causing her some pain , she also developed secondary problems with seedy toe and an underrun sole, both of which my farrier and a specialist farrier are treating.

Has your boy got shoes on? Maisie is very lame without shoes - she is now shod with Natural Balance shoes which are wide across the toe. They have definitely made a difference to her comfort.

Regarding feed I would definitely give the Lamitis Trust a call, I think you need to be cautious in using Haylege and endeavour to find some poor quality hay and/or feeding soaked hay with straw. To give Maise some variety in her diet I replace some of her hay with Speedi-beet which has the Laminitis Trust seal of approval.

Good luck - I know what you're going through
 

TGM

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[ QUOTE ]
think you need to be cautious in using Haylege

[/ QUOTE ] I wouldn't use any old haylage, but the Timothy and High Fibre Horsehages are fine for laminitics being made from grasses that are low in fructans. I used it for my laminitic with no problems and is better for laminitics than rye grass hay.
 

Tia

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I feel sorry for you and your pony. Lots of advice on here regarding feeding. When my pony had lami I fed her ad-lib Dengie hi-fi Lite with the correct amount of Farriers Formula. She was also going out for exercise at least 5 or 6 times a day for short periods. I knew I did not want her stuck in a stable as this is counterproductive to helping them recover. I bought Old Mac's for my pony and these were terrific as she could then go out for walks without her feet hurting.

My pony had rotation however bizarrely on her last x-ray it showed that everything had gone back to where it was supposed to be.

Timothy haylage is useful and a bit cheaper than doing the ad-lib hi-fi, possibly consider feeding some alfalfa too - this has been shown to help with lami.
 

MagicMelon

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Oh and forgot to mention. There's some supplement stuff (pellets, like Farriers Formula) which you can only get from your vet. Think its German, comes in a big red tub. Think its also got "farrier" somewhere in the title....

Anyway, its meant to help keep laminitis away by lowering the sugar in their blood or something along those lines. It does have evidence behind it so I believe is proven to work in some cases.

What is the name of it? It's got a website..... Darn it! Anyone know what Im talking about??
 

brighteyes

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Interesting about the hay. I always swap to hay when our pony gets footy but am sure her haylage isn't the evil it is made out to be as most of the time she's fine on it. It is just having the confidence to go back on it. Really am thinking of trying Horshage, but vets throw a fit if you suggest any such madness! Cuurently, my Cushing's (I suspect, but haven't had it confirmed) pony, age 26, is on soaked hay of questionable quality, Hi-Fi Lite and Hi Fibre pellets, Formula for Feet and two lots of herbs from Hilton - oh, and her garlic. All measured out to the prescribed weights and quantities for her height etc., Now on about a quarter sachet of Danilon per day she is box sound but a bit tentative on hard surfaces and still very heel toe. My farrier is due next week. He didn't want to mess with her feet at the height of her pain - and I agree.

So, boots? Anyone else used them for laminitis with any success? My farrier is all huffy and puffy about them, though is (IMO) a decent farrier. I want her shoes (fronts) off and know she'll struggle without any. Help for me too please?
 

Tempest

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I'd strongly urge you that you immediately stop giving him pony nuts and its absolutely critical that if he's got any weight on him that you get it off and quickly. He wants absolutely minimum feed. Hay only (definitely NOT haylage) and soaked overnight and trickle fed rather than in big portions.

He also shouldn't be walked out in any circumstances if he's got problems with the laminae and is showing any degree of rotation. He needs to be inside and on exceptionally deep bed sawdust to support the foot.

You may also want to consider use of pads on his feet but the x rays will advise your vet and farrier of the best protocol.

Remember - He's unlikely to die of hunger and the risk of feed is much greater to him. If he ends up with rotation and bone protrusion then he'll be in dire circumstances. You've a window of opportunity now. Make sure you don't lose it.

Have a look at this site - full of good ideas http://www.safergrass.org/
 

brighteyes

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Whoa Tom! I have forgotten to add this pony has also suffered recent trauma, stress and a prolonged course of antibiotics which have triggered the laminitis. She has had very mild bouts over the past six years and been back to normal in two weeks. She hasn't an ounce of fat on her, believe me, and the nuts are Spillers Laminitis Trust approved -fed minimal quantity to keep her fibre intake up and her interest in life going. I'm fighting with Cushing's and well aware she may be insulin resistant. She is on a hugely deep shavings bed - and I am thinking I need ACP to sedate her as she is whizzing round it at the moment.
 

Tia

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I suspect Tom has possibly not actually dealt first-hand with laminitis recently. Vet's advice these days is contrary to what he is telling you to do.

Exercise if often the key to recovery and NO horses should NOT be starved; not even laminitics. Bad advice if you ask me, sorry Tom.
 

brighteyes

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Thanks tia. I think many owners of laminitics become specialists at dealing with their own cases - all different and requiring variations on the management theme - and total experts at browsing the net for the latest info!

The HHO Forum is also an excellent source of personal experiences and practical help. All comments welcome and all advice considered carefully.

Would you believe my vet advised us to 'ride her little socks off' in the sand paddock, back in 2000. Yes, you probably would!
 

Tia

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Absolutely! When you have a laminitic you become almost obsessed with it!! You find out EVERYTHING there is to find out and you try many different ideas to find the ones that work. No case is ever the same, the trigger is often different hence the management can differ dramatically for each case.

Incidently my little girl has been totally sound for 2 years now - she has flown half way around the world and is living out 24/7. Rotation (and infact hours away from death at one point) and a very bleak future ahead of her has turned around to her becoming a very healthy, happy, sound little pony again.
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blaze1

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My pony has been getting treatment for laminitis for the past eight weeks he had x-rays taken last week and his pedal bone has rotated 20 degrees he has funny plastic shoes on at the moment, that go up his hoof. the vet told me i have to keep him in for another 3 weeks. Till his next visit for new shoes. I have got him on safe and sound it is a really good feed it has been tested by the laminitis society. Good luck
 
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