Looking to buy mother/daughter share - advice wanted

Myma81

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22 July 2020
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Hi everyone

I've been reading posts for a while but i'm new to posting.

I'm looking to buy a mother/daughter share.

Background:
I had my own horse as a teenager, that lived at my house and we rented a field behind. I was very competent and bold, hacking out alone from a young age and popping small jumps but only for fun.
I'm now a lot older and have had three wonderful children who are at the age where they are much more independent and I want to take up horses again as they were always my passion. However, having had such a long break I am very rusty and have started up lessons again with my daughter. I have also gained lock down weight so I'm currently 5ft3 and 12st but back to healthy eating and exercise to shift the excess pounds.
Daughter has been riding a year so is considered a novice.
I have 2 possible liveries lined up ready to go.

Issues:
I have been looking at preloved, horsesmart and horsequest, but there isn't much in my area; Essex.
Most ads say "not for novice", which is really restricting what is available to me.
Budget is around 3-4000

Advice:
Do you think a cob or connie is best suited?
Has anyone purchased from Irish sports equine? What has been your experience?
Would you buy a horse with sarcoid on the belly? This is on one advertised, aparently vet has checked and says that is the only vice.
Any advice/suggestions wanted

Thanks
 

Lintel

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I wouldn't be focusing on a particular breed etc unless your wanting to do something specific.

I was be steering clear of sarcoid personally.

I would get your own vetting done. ALWAYS.

Don't limit yourself with ages some of the best all round safe horses are abit older but will give you years of joy and SAFTEY!

Good Luck, it's like finding a needle in a haystack, you have to rifle through a lot of nonsense, take an instructor or somebody knowleagble with you when you view- two pairs of eyes are always better 👍
 

Myma81

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22 July 2020
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Thank you for the advice Lintel
My reason for considering breed is to find a horse that can carry my weight and I am aware Cobs are weight carriers.
 

Upthecreek

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Don’t have a fixed idea of breed but do look for an older horse that is already doing what you and your daughter want to do and is kept in a similar environment to where you will keep it.

Take someone experienced to viewings and ask to see the horse ridden by the owner first and then you try the horse doing the activities you want to do e.g schooling/hacking. Ask to see it jumping if you will want to jump in the future but aren’t confident to do it at the viewing.

Ask specific questions about any vices/quirks/behaviour issues/previous illness or injuries. Personally I would not buy a horse with sarcoids.

If you agree to purchase have it vetted by your choice of vet (not recommended by seller) and be present for the vetting.

Consider an older horse that hasn’t had a hard a life. Basically you want something that has been there and done it and has a nice easy going temperament. Keep saving while you are looking - what you are looking for is in demand and you are more likely to have a bit more choice with a bigger budget. You will probably need to widen your search area too.

I may be wrong but I don’t think you can go and try the horses at Irish Sports Equine and buying unseen is a definite no no for the inexperienced in my opinion, especially when children are involved.
 

be positive

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You are not that heavy so no need for a true weight carrier although a cob type would probably be most suitable for the job you want it for, I would steer away from buying unseen as it is a huge gamble for anyone let alone a mum looking for a pony to share with a child, most dealers will not have well established equines for sale, most will need a fair bit of work and any videos will only show the best bits.

As for reading the ads, you need to read between the lines, many say not for novices but when you look properly many are being sold by people that are novices themselves, yes they may be selling because they have encountered issues but often they are moving on to something bigger/ better and are overrating their own ability or trying to avoid real numpties/ timewasters or just overselling the pony, so phone a few that look suitable other than the no novice part and ask why and what they do to make them unsuitable, it may be something that you could not manage but it is always worth a call, on that I would always speak to the seller as you can gauge a lot from their reaction that is missed in text.

As already said do vet, take someone experienced with you, try and look at those already doing what you want to do and one that needs a slightly easier life could well suit you but it does still need to be fit for purpose and hopefully up to lasting a fair while.
 

Pearlsasinger

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As above, don't worry about the breed, look for the temperament that you need -it's a poor horse that can't carry 12 st. Make sure that you see and try the prospective purchase doing everything you would want to do with it, take someone experienced to view it with yu and use your own vet, not he seller's vet There aren't many horses for sale atm and the good ones are sold quickly but if you wait a couple of months, I predict that there will be loads and the prices will come down.
 

Myma81

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22 July 2020
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Thanks, I am making a list of everyone's advice.

From what I have read - Irish Sports Equine deliver horse to you and provide 14 days for you to decide whether it is suitable. They offer an exchange of not, but I am unsure of the costs that would involve. It looks good as they say they are fully trained and have novices riding them. Some are suitable for riding schools etc.The website has good testimonials. But I was concerned about not trying first and whether they might just take my money and run.

Can you please identify the dodgy Essex dealer so I can steer clear? Thanks
 

Pearlsasinger

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Thanks, I am making a list of everyone's advice.

From what I have read - Irish Sports Equine deliver horse to you and provide 14 days for you to decide whether it is suitable. They offer an exchange of not, but I am unsure of the costs that would involve. It looks good as they say they are fully trained and have novices riding them. Some are suitable for riding schools etc.The website has good testimonials. But I was concerned about not trying first and whether they might just take my money and run.

Can you please identify the dodgy Essex dealer so I can steer clear? Thanks


Please don't, there are a few threads on here, where the purchase didn't end well. In fact don't buy unseen from anywhere, buying a horse isn't like getting a bike, the 2 parties have to like each other for the purchase to be a success. You will only know if you and the horse gel when you meet.
 

bubsqueaks

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16 July 2015
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Reiterate never ever buy unseen - if your on facebook join dodgy dealer page - always do an ABC when buying a horse
A ask everything
B believe nothing
C check everything
TBH you may need to up your budget but if your happy to wait the prices are bound to crash with the downspiralling economy
As people have said dont go for specific breeds - cobs can be backward thinking & nappy - connies can be forward & sharp - it can restrict your search
 

[131452]

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Check out all the dodgy dealer groups on Facebook and search for the name you're thinking of buying from. Also Google them.
Sammarie Phebb /Meadow stables are in Essex , this this is one to avoid at all costs. Be aware that she has a number of people selling for her who pretend not to be associated with her.
 

CanteringCarrot

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I cannot stress enough: do not buy sight unseen in your situation.

Do not.


Especially as a re-rider just getting back into things. Especially when you need a safe mount for yourself and your daughter. Your kids safety should be #1, why stick her on a horse you don't know. That you've never touched. That you've never riden or seen in person.

There has to be some local options. This isn't a purchase that you want to rush.

Get a vet check done on your own. A thorough one. Don't buy anyone's x-rays or vet info.

I've bought sight unseen, and possibly would again, but I was in a totally different situation.

I wouldn't focus on breed, I'd focus on quality training.
 

Myma81

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Okay i've started looking at the fb pages and there are so many, I'm even more unsure of who to trust.

There are local options which I will now only go with due to all your advice. Do you any of you have recommendations in the Essex, Kent, Suffolk area that I might be able to contact?

I will obviously trial anything myself before allowing her on, and will use lead rein until she is comfortable. Yes safety first for my baby that goes without saying. She doesn't even know i'm looking, I will not allow her to get excited until i am certain everything is okay and we are going ahead.
 
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This is coming from a place of experience, not a place of judgement- give it another year. Ideally start with a share of someone else's horse (although, this not always easy to find.) Don't underestimate how even the safest horse can be very unsettled in a new place, and it can take a lot of confidence to work through this- it's no good buying a horse that will be suitable on its best days, you need something that you can cope with happily even on its worst days.
 

LadyGascoyne

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I really can’t stress how risky buying unseen from Ireland is, in your situation. Returning an unsuitable horse is not an easy thing to do - it’s emotionally stressful and it’s likely to be extremely hard on children who are excited to have a horse join the family, and may get attached quickly.

Have a read of this thread, as it’s not a dissimilar situation to the one you are outlining.

https://forums.horseandhound.co.uk/threads/never-thought-i’d-be-writing-this.792133/

I certainly don’t think you’re heavy, at all. I am currently shopping for a horse for my nearly 17st husband- that is an exercise in finding a specialist weight carrier. I’d expect most horses to carry you with their eyes closed!

I also think your budget seems reasonable. I think you might just need to be a bit patient.
 

ihatework

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Do not buy unseen from these dealers that offer false promises on cheap horses. If you are buying from a dealer your budget won’t be big enough for a genuine horse from a genuine dealer unless you are buying a declared ‘but’ like the sarcoid you mention.

As for the sarcoid - if it bought the right horse into your budget then I would most definitely consider it, depending on the type of sarcoid and the location.

Do not rush into purchase. For 3-4k you will need to be patient and you would be advised to look at teenage horses from local amateur riders, already doing the job that you want to do. Worth popping up a ‘wanted’ ad around local Tackshop’s, Facebook groups, riding clubs, pony clubs, hunts.
 

Spottyappy

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Dealers are fine, imho, but you must must must go to a repeatable one. There are many out there who are reputable, although not Many in your area. I did, however, recently buy one from an Essex dealer, albeit that is not his main role. She would have suited you down to the ground. PM me if you would like his details as I’m sure he would be able to source you a similar one if he doesn’t currently have one, although would likely be over your budget.
I also agree with the above poster who said consider an older horse. A sarcoid would not bother me, although as a novice I would recommend you get your own vets opinion on it, as some can be nasty.
 

Green Bean

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Having been exactly like you four years ago, I strongly recommend being clear in your mind what you want in the horse. I bought on a ‘I’ve always wanted a Dutch Warmblood’ whim. She was gorgeous, well schooled but highly strung and simply too much for me. On the opposite end, don’t buy the ‘safe as houses’ horse who won’t turn into the horse you really want for your daughter. I would steer clear of youngsters as you won’t necessarily have the experience to bring them on, even though they may be in your price range. Never buy the ‘sold from the field’ horse unless you know the background personally. Never buy from a dealer, period. There seem to be very few ‘happy ever after’ stories for them. I didn’t follow my above advice for my second horse, bought from a dealer who lied about so many things in her advert. Saying that though, despite her faults, I wouldn’t swap her for the world. Good luck!
 

Myma81

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22 July 2020
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This is coming from a place of experience, not a place of judgement- give it another year. Ideally start with a share of someone else's horse (although, this not always easy to find.) Don't underestimate how even the safest horse can be very unsettled in a new place, and it can take a lot of confidence to work through this- it's no good buying a horse that will be suitable on its best days, you need something that you can cope with happily even on its worst days.
I have been looking for a loan for many months, but there is nothing local to me.
 

Gloi

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I have been looking for a loan for many months, but there is nothing local to me.
It is more likely that you just don't know the right people yet. Have patience, get involved with pony club, something will turn up especially later in the year. And as people have said you are in no position to buy one unseen or without someone with you.
 
Joined
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I bought my first horse seen in May and I agree don’t buy unseen. 14 days isn’t long enough to tell if the horse is suitable as I had to wait a week before I got a saddle and it takes some horses a while to settle in, you need to be able to try all sorts with them like schooling, solo and group hacks, maybe take them somewhere which is impossible to do in 14 days as you are still getting to know each other so just hang in there and the right one will come along. My instructor found me mine and came with me to view and she’s now schooling him as well as still teaching me so maybe ask your instructor as they know loads of people that maybe need a sharer or want to sell. Good luck, it took me a good few months to find my boy but he was worth the wait
 

bubsqueaks

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I have been looking for a loan for many months, but there is nothing local to me.
Whereabouts are you in Essex?
If you join Essex Horse Riders on facebook there are loads being offered for share at the moment.
Other dodgy dealers to avoid are Maisie Langan, Joe Rashid, Ricky (changes surname) - theres a whole link gang of them who change horses, photo shop pics, lie, cheat, mis sell, drug etc etc.
 

[131452]

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At the moment 3-4K will not get you a genuine , sound and healthy, uncomplicated mother daughter share type. I'm looking for similar and in all honesty you would need about 5K and even for that and more I've not found a sound one.
I would honestly wait for the winter when prices should fall and then look for a word of mouth recommendation on a horse with a known history .
Even the good dealers only have the horses for a matter of days if not hours,they can't possibly say what the horse is really like after that time. An experienced owner /rider can cope with the quirks that can come out after purchase, like maybe the horse isn't good to hose or gets spooky when it's windy.
But a novice owner is less likely to be able to cope.
Returning a horse and getting your money back is very difficult with most dealers.
A lot of them now call themselves agents and make you pay the money directly to the horse's seller. That way you will find it very hard to get a refund out of them.

One I had vetted last week that turned out to be lame in 3 legs, is still being sold by the agent and they are encouraging viewers not to bother with a vetting , and certainly not disclosing that the horse failed the vetting only a week ago.
And this is a 7 grand mother daughter share type horse!

I would strongly urge you to wait a few months and then look locally for a horse with a known history. IME this is the safest option.
 
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