Mineral/salt lick for horse with ulcers

Joined
29 October 2015
Messages
335
Location
Sunny Stirlingshire
Hello lovely HHO'ers!

I'm looking for recommendations for a mineral/salt lick for a (greedy guzzle-guts!) horse with ulcers.

Are the Protexin Gut Lix ones any good? The Himalayan block in the stable doesn't get touched. I have bought the Horslyx ones before, and not only have they disappeared ridiculously fast, but I'm trying to go sugar-free...

Any suggestions/reviews gratefully received!

Thanks.
 
Joined
29 October 2015
Messages
335
Location
Sunny Stirlingshire
Thanks supsup for your reply.

Yes, I already feed a balancer, so all basic vit/min requirements are covered. I also add in a bit of table salt to her feed in the summer when she works hard or gets sweaty.

All the horses have ad-lib hay/haylege. However, all the other horses on the yard also have some form of lick/treat when they are stabled. I guess I'm just wanting to make sure she has something healthy to do if/when bored - she can crib, and I'm wanting to offer alternatives! I'm not really wanting to introduce the hanging veg idea or treat balls etc, as she doesn't need the extra calories!

I'll maybe order one of the Protexin Gut Lix and see how we go. Thanks x
 
Joined
5 January 2015
Messages
664
I've read about a study (I think this one maybe? http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.2746/042516402776250450/full) that shows that offering many different types of forage is a pretty effective way to keep the horse interested and foraging for longer, and show fewer stereotypies. I understand the point about weight management, but if you're feeding ad-lib, you don't have control over intake anyway. Unless your alternative forage has a higher energy density (or is made artificially tasty e.g. with molasses), hopefully the overall intake wouldn't change that much even if you offered alternatives. If your yard has both hay and haylage, maybe you could try to offer some of both, plus some low-calorie chaff (in a tub trug with large stones, to make it a slow-feeder), or maybe hang up some branches with foliage? I guess the challenge would be to pick additional forage products that are similarly tasty to your normal hay/haylage, so the horse keeps rotating between what's on offer, rather than guzzling down the tastiest first and then be bored. I've tried hay cobs, for example (bought from zooplus, or kramer.co.uk). Unlike grass nuts, they are just pressed hay, so less nutritions than most grass pellets harvested at peak. My boy actually found them to be so boring that they didn't make a good base to hide his supplements in, but they made a good filler for his treat ball. Interesting enough to work for when bored, but not tasty enough to stuff himself on.
 
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