New horse out hacking

SpringArising

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3 May 2014
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I'm sorry OP but this sounds like it really has the potential to go horribly wrong. The horse has been described as needing confidence from his rider. There's no way to put this that doesn't sound rude, but why did you think he would be a good match for you?

Like SportsMan said, you need to be looking for one that is advertised as a hacking horse or fab to hack etc.

Have you not tried the horse out hacking alone at the sellers either? That's THE most important thing that you should have done. He might be a complete sod to go with alone. Always do the things that you plan to do with the horse at the viewing.

It's NOT too late to change your mind. Don't be pressured into something if you're having doubts.
 

FestiveFuzz

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I'm afraid I have to agree with SpringArising and MrsJingle, if hacking solo was my main priority I would absolutely be making sure the horse I was buying would hack alone before I bought it rather than just taking the owners word for it. I would be somewhat skeptical of any seller who wouldn't allow you to take the horse for a short hack alone tbh.

I know you say it's not easy to get back and forth to the horse, but I'd argue it's harder to sell a horse on if you run into troubles so I really would try and find the time to go back and hack alone before it arrives.
 

Jellymoon

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17 August 2008
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I completely disagree with people saying ‘just get on and hack him’, if you are feeling at all apprehensive and think you won’t have the confidence to deal with a nervous horse trying to nap for home then don’t put yourself in that situation. People can be all bravado and just get on with if they want, that’s up to them. I see only benefit in getting to know him on the ground, building up trust in a safe environment, then taking it step by step. There is no rush. You are no less of a horsewoman if you take it slowly.

I do agree he may not sound entirely suitable, but a friend of a friend recently bought a horse with a similar description and it’s turned out to be absolutely lovely and perfect for her. She initially took the just get straight on and hack it approach, got bucked off, nearly sent it back, then decided to take it back a step and bond with it on the ground first. They are completely in love now, having a fab time, and have progressed from just hacking to going xc!
 

Cortez

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17 January 2009
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How did you get on OP? You'll have had time to find out what he's like by now, I should imagine. If there is a problem, could you get someone else to take him out for you a couple of times?
 
Joined
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You have to remember new place, new surroundings, you have to get to know each other I would not rush things-there is no rulebook just enjoy being together-no rush!
 

amymay

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1 July 2004
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I completely disagree with people saying ‘just get on and hack him’, if you are feeling at all apprehensive and think you won’t have the confidence to deal with a nervous horse trying to nap for home then don’t put yourself in that situation. People can be all bravado and just get on with if they want, that’s up to them. I see only benefit in getting to know him on the ground, building up trust in a safe environment, then taking it step by step. There is no rush.
I’d rather be dealing with a napping horse whilst on board, not in hand on the road.

Any way, it’s semantics. The horse was arriving on the 8th, and I’m sure that whatever OP decided to do has gone well.
 
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