New horse - WWYD?

micramadam

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Had 5 stage vetting yesterday with 23 xrays of legs and back. She scored 3 1's and 3 2's on her legs. Back was very good but there was a tiny bone chip in one of her back legs. Other legs are very very clean. Had a long discussion with the vet about it and he was quite happy to pass her for the vetting. He said that it was no reason not to buy her and just for the record this was an independant very experienced equine vet who regularly does these vettings for horses being sold internationally and the vettings required for stallions to be accepted into various studbooks and grading for the mares. Practice has an excellent reputation.
Horse is a 3.5 yo old Frederiksborg mare and not yet under the saddle. She has been worked a lot the last 3 months in hand and moves like a dream. Vet says she is perfect for dressage (I never mentioned what I am going to use her for) and that the chip should not cause a problem. It can be surgically removed if necessary.
I intend to only ride recreationally but my daughter will eventually compete with her (affiliated dressage).
Insurance company will accept her without exclusions because of this vet's recommendation. Horse is VERY expensive because of the rarity (endangered breed) of her breed and the rarity of her colour in her breed (palomino).
I was wondering if others would be so put off by this that you would walk away from the sale and should I be more concerned than I am?
 

unbalanced

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If you buy I would talk to someone about having the chip removed. Mine had one before I bought her then ten or fifteen years later she became lame on it and we found she has abraded much of the cartilage in that joint. She is 23 now and still does pretty much everything I want.
 

Custard Cream

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Would not be concerned, would not walk away. She sounds perfect for what you want. If she is an endangered breed, would you want to breed from her?
 

soulfull

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Wouldn't bother me. I have read that quite a few have already had small bone chips removed. Wish I could remember where I read it for you
 

Goldenstar

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You paid for the vets opinion and he says she ok so I would go for it .
I would however talk to the vet about the chip I am no expert on bone chips and would want to understand if there is anything terms of monitoring it that can be done to minimise any risk of issues in the future .
 

lula

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You paid for the vets opinion and he says she ok so I would go for it .
I would however talk to the vet about the chip I am no expert on bone chips and would want to understand if there is anything terms of monitoring it that can be done to minimise any risk of issues in the future .
this.
any chance in discussing a slight negotiation in the price with vendor? i think you'd be within your rights to do so since as Goldenstar says., this might need monitoring and could well need surgery at some time in the future to remove this chip. Your filly is young, you have no exact way of knowing as she ages how this could affect her under saddle in later years.
 

Ruby2

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If the vet has passed and insurance company are happy I would go ahead. Maybe check insurance company would cover cost of removing chip if it ever came to that and definately see if you can negotiate a reduction in price. You never know - good luck.
 

micramadam

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I've already had a substantial reduction in price from what they were originally asking so know they won't drop it again. On the plus side, they are the biggest stud in the world for these horses and because this is an endangered breed, maintain contact with all the owners they have sold to. We will also be taking part in major events with them in the future so they will be able to moniter this as well. They have a vested personal interest in all horses and even when sold still feel responsible if anything happens to the horses as their reputation is very important to them. If their horses are resold the owners generally tend to come back to their stud for their horse to be sold by the stud acting as agent. They see buyers of these horses as extended family and treat them as such.
 

Shysmum

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If the bone chip is a pre-existing condition picked up by the vet, I don't think there is any way it will be covered by insurance - it will be immediately excluded from your policy. To be fair, why should an insurance company pick up the tab for it ?

could be very expensive for you to sort out yourself ?
 

ihatework

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The cost of removing a chip is small compared to presumably the cost of the horse (from what you have said).
I would probably go ahead and purchase however 2 things extra to consider
A) I'd discuss with the vet about removing the chip now
B) there is evidence to suggest OCD can show a hereditary link, so if you are considering this just worth keeping in mind
 

Goldenstar

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Tbh if you can afford to buy an expensive and rare warmblood you can afford to have a bone chip removed at your own cost if necessary.
The only other I would say is never spend more on a horse than you are prepared to lose .
 

Goldenstar

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Just a thought was the vet that gave the opinion on the X-rays British actually I dont mean that , i mean was he based in Britain .
If not I would definatly ask a British based equine specialist to interpret them for me before proceeding .
 

micramadam

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Goldenstar, the vet is Dutch. He advised to leave it and only operate if it started to cause a problem. He doesn't think it will but there's never a 100% guarantee. Will be checking with the insurance company today about the insurance and the implications of this on the insurance. They will want to see the report anyway. Vet asked me which company i would be using and when he heard who they were said it wouldn't be a problem. The only thing is that he said they may not insure the leg for a period of 6 - 9 months after any operation.
I will call and ask about implications for breeding as with her being an endangered breed, the stud have asked me to consider breeding at least 2 foals from her to help them save the breed.
 

WelshD

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I wouldnt buy the horse personally but it sounds like you are quite far down the road to buying it so I doubt anyones opinions here will make any difference (said in the nicest possible way as I have a lot of time for you as a poster :) )

TBH I would also be worried about the stud's closeness to the ongoing ownership, if you choose not to breed from her what happens then? Its nice for them to take an interest but I wouldnt want such a close relationship personally - but then I am funny about feeling under scrutiny

If you do buy this horse I wish you all the very best, you have had enough bad luck x
 

Goldenstar

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Goldenstar, the vet is Dutch. He advised to leave it and only operate if it started to cause a problem. He doesn't think it will but there's never a 100% guarantee. Will be checking with the insurance company today about the insurance and the implications of this on the insurance. They will want to see the report anyway. Vet asked me which company i would be using and when he heard who they were said it wouldn't be a problem. The only thing is that he said they may not insure the leg for a period of 6 - 9 months after any operation.
I will call and ask about implications for breeding as with her being an endangered breed, the stud have asked me to consider breeding at least 2 foals from her to help them save the breed.
Definatly get a British based vet to assess these X-rays .
 

Cortez

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Just a thought was the vet that gave the opinion on the X-rays British actually I dont mean that , i mean was he based in Britain .
If not I would definatly ask a British based equine specialist to interpret them for me before proceeding .
Why? Don't you think Dutch vets are capable?
 

Caol Ila

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Why would a British vet be better than a Dutch one? Given what a horsey place Holland is, I suspect they have pretty good vets over there.

I hope the horse works out, micramadam. You deserve some good luck!

Edit: crossposted *snap* with Cortez!
 

Goldenstar

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Why? Don't you think Dutch vets are capable?
No not at all.
The norms for vetting for purchase vary considerably country to country
I know this personally therefore the opinion of a vet giving purchase advice used to working under the RCVS guidelines would be what I would be seeking if I was worried and spending serious money.
It's not a reflection on foreign vets skill .
 

unbalanced

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When mine had her chip removed from her fetlock it was £2500 from rossdales, plus the aftercare. It is an arthroscopy and involves several months off. PM me if you want any more information.
 

micramadam

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The horse and I have an amazing click. Something I never expected to happen again after losing Ruby. As it stands, the sale is going ahead. Life is full of risks and nothing ventured nothing gained. At least this is a problem that won't kill her. (I hope). I really do appreciate all the advice given and just wanted to see what people's thoughts were.

Welsh D, the stud is 3 hours drive away in the very north of holland so they'll not be in my pocket. If I don't want to breed from her or go to an event, they will not force me. They feel responsible as they bred her and are trying to promote and save the breed. If this does become a problem, they will step up and help me. These are very genuine people and true horse people. I realise that it is their business and have to make money but they do genuinely care where their horses end up and what happens to them. They make a point of matching horse and owner and do refuse sales if they have any doubts. I wish more breeders and horse owners were like them.
 
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YasandCrystal

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They sound like a caring and very responsible stud. I agree sometimes you just have to go with your gut and take chances in life. I can't wait to see a picture of her.
 
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