New horse

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24 October 2021
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Hi, my new horse arrived this morning and I am wondering how long I should leave her to settle in before I start riding her. She is stabled at night but is in the field on her own during the day. This is my first horse so I'm new to this! She also has more grass in her new field then she is used to so do I just leave her our for less time or do I split the field into sections to make it smaller?
 

GrassChop

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Hi!
Congratulations on your new horse!
If there is too much grass in the field and it's quite rich, I'd cut some of it off and gradually increase so you don't upset her stomach. I would usually give a couple of weeks to settle and maybe some inhand stuff in between if you want to. :) Good luck!
 

Bob notacob

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The honest truth is that all our lives with horses are a category of mistakes .I have over half a centuary of experience to base this on. What I like about the poster is the refreshing honesty of the enquiry. Get the tack on asap and go for a happy hack WITH A FRIEND.Steer clear of school work at the start ,Just get to be a pal with your horse.
 

Ambers Echo

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Congratulations on your new horse. I always ride from day 1 personally. I don’t want them over fresh when I get on for the first time, I want them in a routine and with a job asap and they are often better behaved at the very beginning before they get their hooves under the table a start testing boundaries so I want riding to be no big deal and normal by then.

Re the grass - yes restrict it by sectioning it off.
 
Joined
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Congratulations on your new horse. I always ride from day 1 personally. I don’t want them over fresh when I get on for the first time, I want them in a routine and with a job asap and they are often better behaved at the very beginning before they get their hooves under the table a start testing boundaries so I want riding to be no big deal and normal by then.

Re the grass - yes restrict it by sectioning it off.
Thank you that's really helpful.
 

ycbm

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I would leave her out for less time and ride her. If there is a lot of grass in the field you would have to make it a very tiny section for her not to eat too much.

So I would section it and leave her out less time, then lengthen the time when she has eaten it down.

Is there any option for her to get more turnout in another area?
.
 
Joined
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I would leave her out for less time and ride her. If there is a lot of grass in the field you would have to make it a very tiny section for her not to eat too much.

So I would section it and leave her out less time, then lengthen the time when she has eaten it down.

Is there any option for her to get more turnout in another area?
.
No, she only has the one field but it is big enough to split it up.
 

Pinkvboots

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I would ride or lunge the next day then just crack on if your hacking try and find someone to go with for the first few times.

I would section the field to limit grass to start with.
 

ycbm

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No, she only has the one field but it is big enough to split it up.
Yes but if you don't want her to eat too much grass, and you want to leave her out all day, you'll have to make it a postage stamp and then she can't get movement anyway.

With a new horse, you really want her moving.
.
 

Shoei

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OP, I second what others have said about getting on or lunging, depending if she has settled. Some horses do take some time to settle so it's best to lunge for a few days.

I'd also do some ground work exercises with her to help build up relationship between the two of you.

You say she has more grass than she is used to, how much does she have (there is a google tool that is useful to measure acreage in maps if you are unsure). This will be helpful to know. My grass is currently not very rich and lush so my horses are on more acreage.

Many people keep there horses successfully on individual turnout and many liveries specify it, but most horses do enjoy others company, even if it is over a fenceline. I will not assume that your keeping your horse on it's own but many people do successfully, even if it is not what everyone would choose to do.

Please do ask questions if you have any, all of us lucky enough to have had horses have been through that 1st horse/ new owner stage and all have us have had questions and made mistakes!

But above all enjoy your new horse and congratulations
 
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OP, I second what others have said about getting on or lunging, depending if she has settled. Some horses do take some time to settle so it's best to lunge for a few days.

I'd also do some ground work exercises with her to help build up relationship between the two of you.

You say she has more grass than she is used to, how much does she have (there is a google tool that is useful to measure acreage in maps if you are unsure). This will be helpful to know. My grass is currently not very rich and lush so my horses are on more acreage.

Many people keep there horses successfully on individual turnout and many liveries specify it, but most horses do enjoy others company, even if it is over a fenceline. I will not assume that your keeping your horse on it's own but many people do successfully, even if it is not what everyone would choose to do.

Please do ask questions if you have any, all of us lucky enough to have had horses have been through that 1st horse/ new owner stage and all have us have had questions and made mistakes!

But above all enjoy your new horse and congratulations
Thanks, she's on about half an acre but the grass is rich. She is also small and so does not need as much. My instructor told me today to section it into 2 or bring her in every 3 hours or so, 1 to get her used to being handled by another person and 2 so she doesn't get as much grass.

I rode her this afternoon and she was pretty good. We did a bit of walk and trot on roads and bridle paths then rode in a field, she decided to do a walk to canter then gallop and it took awhile to pull her up but it will take time to get used to her. She doesn't need any leg to get her going and has a mind of her own but I guess I just need to get her to trust me more which will take time.
 

ycbm

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Thanks, she's on about half an acre but the grass is rich. She is also small and so does not need as much. My instructor told me today to section it into 2 or bring her in every 3 hours or so, 1 to get her used to being handled by another person and 2 so she doesn't get as much grass.

I rode her this afternoon and she was pretty good. We did a bit of walk and trot on roads and bridle paths then rode in a field, she decided to do a walk to canter then gallop and it took awhile to pull her up but it will take time to get used to her. She doesn't need any leg to get her going and has a mind of her own but I guess I just need to get her to trust me more which will take time.

Is she alone?
.
 

GrassChop

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Just looked back at previous threads and from what I can establish, OP is 14 years old who's experience has come from volunteering at riding schools. This older 23yo pony is on loan and staying at her home with non-horsey family i.e. no company presumably and no other experienced people around but trying to play devils advocate and hope that isn't the case.
 
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Just looked back at previous threads and from what I can establish, OP is 14 years old who's experience has come from volunteering at riding schools. This older 23yo pony is on loan and staying at her home with non-horsey family i.e. no company presumably and no other experienced people around but trying to play devils advocate and hope that isn't the case.
This doesn't have anything to do with my post. I asked how long she should have to settle in before i start riding and what i needed to do about the grass. if your going to reply, make it helpful.
 

GrassChop

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This doesn't have anything to do with my post. I asked how long she should have to settle in before i start riding and what i needed to do about the grass. if your going to reply, make it helpful.
If you refer back to my previous posts actually, I have backed you up and given you advice.
I'm just responding to other people's queries on here about the pony being on her own. If you read what I have said properly, I have not said anything unkind so there is no need for the attitude.
 
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Slow.sleighbells

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Some horses never settle alone. Too much grass could also be contributing to the horse being on its toes and appearing unsettled. Can you muzzle and look for a livery yard/riding school with competent help to get you and your horse confident together?

And no one has said anything unhelpful - but if your situation really is as Grasschop said then it isn't ideal. People want to see you and your new pony happy together and enjoying yourselves, and an inappropriate setup makes that that much less likely.
 

Baywonder

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Firstly congratulations on your new pony!

OP you have been given some good advice to take on board so far. Please don't take any questions the wrong way, as they are asked with good intentions. Everyone is trying to gain as much information as possible, in order to offer you the most helpful suggestions for both you and your pony.

There are some extremely knowledgeable and helpful people on this forum, and I'm sue you will find their advice very helpful, whatever situation or problem you may have.
 
Joined
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Just looked back at previous threads and from what I can establish, OP is 14 years old who's experience has come from volunteering at riding schools. This older 23yo pony is on loan and staying at her home with non-horsey family i.e. no company presumably and no other experienced people around but trying to play devils advocate and hope that isn't the case.
Sorry! I've just realised I replied to the wrong person. Sorry for the confusion and thank you for the tips you have given me. She has settled much better now and is listening to me more when I'm riding.
 
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Firstly congratulations on your new pony!

OP you have been given some good advice to take on board so far. Please don't take any questions the wrong way, as they are asked with good intentions. Everyone is trying to gain as much information as possible, in order to offer you the most helpful suggestions for both you and your pony.

There are some extremely knowledgeable and helpful people on this forum, and I'm sue you will find their advice very helpful, whatever situation or problem you may have.
Thank you
 
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