Novice parent looking into owning a horse for my daughter

Joined
2 November 2021
Messages
4
Hi all, I am hoping you guys might be able to help. My daughter who is 12 has been learning to ride for a couple of years, she also takes part in horse care and management at her stables. She is in love with horses and I can see that maybe in the next year either a loan or potentially buying her a horse may be on the cards. I am a total novice so the whole thought of finding a suitable horse to ensuring it is well cared for is a little daunting. Just wondered if any of you have been in this situation and if you have any tips on how I can educate myself to ensure we make the right decision for both her and the horse. Thanks in advance x
 

Pearlsasinger

Well-Known Member
Joined
20 February 2009
Messages
36,423
Location
W. Yorks
Read as much as you can about horse care/stable management. The BHS do a training course and exam for owners, which, if you can access, it would be good for you and your daughter todo together. I would involve your instructor in finding the right horse/pony, as s/he will know your daughter's strengths and requirements. Let daughter get as much varied riding experience as possible, riding holidays are good for this.
 

millikins

Well-Known Member
Joined
7 March 2011
Messages
3,161
I'd recommend keeping your first horse or pony on full or part livery at a yard with other children until you have learned enough to take over more yourself. Be wary of taking advice that's offered but not been asked for.
Buy from a reputable dealer, ask on here for someone in your area, look up names on FB, there are "dodgy dealer" groups to tell you who to avoid. Someone established with a reputation to protect and some degree of legal comeback if things do go wrong.
Good luck, it's fun. When I bought my daughter's first pony everyone warned of the expense, however I did all my sums and was reasonably near my budget, what nobody warned me about was the time commitment.
 

Arzada

Well-Known Member
Joined
10 April 2012
Messages
1,259
As a taster for the responsibility of loaning or owning a friend's daughter of a similar age was able to 'share' a pony owned by her riding school meaning that at weekends and for events the pony was 'hers' to ride and look after. Does your riding school offer anything like this?
 

Winters100

Well-Known Member
Joined
18 April 2015
Messages
1,792
Well done you that you are asking for advice now, rather than rushing into buying and then asking about a problem!

The difficulty with buying is that even for an experienced owner it is good to take advice, but the first step is knowing who to take advice from!

An instructor is a good start, but even then I would caution that it is not necessarily a perfect solution. I train with one pro who has on many occasions recommended to me, or tried to sell himself, horses which would be totally unsuitable. I like him, he is a great pro, but I am aware of his limitations. I know that for him it would be much more convenient if I had horses which I needed him to train, and needed endless lessons with, rather than the safe and sensible 'made' horses that I have.

I would second the advice from Gloi to join the local pony club. You will learn a lot.

Definitely do not fall into the trap of thinking that you need a youngster. An older pony who has seen it all is much more likely to suit as a first pony. If you can share or loan even better. Remember that youngsters can be unpredictable, and that confidence is easily shattered and takes a long time to re-build.

Do not rush into anything. It is always much less stress and heartache to not own a pony than it is to own the wrong one. And never buy unseen or without a proper vetting by a vet of your choice, not one recommended by the seller.

The looks of the pony are not important, safety and fun is. Likewise a smart competition yard with great facilities but no turnout will be mush less suitable than a scruffy yard with a knowledgeable and helpful yard owner and a drafty arena.

I realize that it all sounds daunting, but there are great ponies out there who will give your little girl no end of fun. You just need to take your time to find the right one.

I can say from personal experience that I have found my best horses when I have been open to buying, but not feeling that I 'need' to buy. Try to have the mentality that you will buy if something super comes along, but that you can accommodate her riding elsewhere if it doesn't.

Good luck, and do take your time!
 
Joined
3 November 2021
Messages
6
Hi, we are very new to loaning. My daughter is 10 and had formed a great partnership with a beautiful, young pony. Her stables decided to close the riding school part of their business so rather than move we decided to loan. It wasn’t much more expensive than monthly lessons tbh. Could you maybe loan a horse from your current riding school that she’s been on before? That’s what we’ve done. Excited to be looking after such a lovely boy & giving our daughter the extra responsibilities that come with looking after such a complex animal. I’ve been looking up everything I can find & have joined here for extra advice. Good luck
 
Joined
2 November 2021
Messages
4
Hi All, thanks so much for your advice. You have given me lots to go away and think about. Her yard is lovely and friendly but there isn't any opportunity to grow much further, we cannot loan/share any of the horses and there is no facilities to let her hack out, to grow that side of her experience. The holiday idea is a great one and I will look into that, I feel some kind of share would be a fantastic next step but looking on a local FB page for horses in our area, most are saying no under 18s and no novice rides. Her yard doesn't run a pony club but I didn't realise you could join without a horse so another great tip :) Thanks again xx
 

windand rain

Well-Known Member
Joined
25 November 2012
Messages
7,854
The pony club is a national/ international organisation. I let kids ride my ponies to move them from school ponies to private ponies as they are very very different. The old girl in my avatar has taught dozens of people to ride and I now have a very pretty little pony for smaller riders who is doing the same my only ask is the parents and riders have their own insurance and don't run about screaming on my premises. I am an altruist so don't ask for payment but a bag of feed is appreciated as a gift from time to time. I am pretty certain I am not unique so maybe an ask is what you need to do. Always happy to have a little help as long as no money changes hands and it is appreciated but you might have to kiss a few frogs to find your prince or princess
 
Last edited:

HashRouge

Well-Known Member
Joined
16 February 2009
Messages
7,567
Location
Manchester
The pony club is a national/ international organisation. I let kids ride my ponies to move them from school ponies to private ponies as they are very very different. The old girl in my avatar has taught dozens of people to ride and I now have a very pretty little pony for smaller riders who is doing the same my only ask is the parents and riders have their own insurance and don't run about screaming on my premises. I am an altruist so don't ask for payment but a bag of feed is appreciated as a gift from time to time. I am pretty certain I am not unique so maybe an ask is what you need to do. Always happy to have a little help as long as no money changes hands and it is appreciated but you might have to kiss a few frogs to find your prince or princess
I think you are quite unique. I always think what a kind, generous person you are when I read your posts :)
 
Joined
9 September 2021
Messages
5
I’ve been in a similar situation, bough a pony 2 months ago. My daughter s 14. We’ve just moved to a diy yard. I can’t even put a head collar on, so it’s still scary, but all’s going well so far touch wood. My daughter is like a different person - I wish I was braver and didnt spend so long worrying about it. What helped me: 1) making sure I get the right (safe) pony for her abilities, 2) making sure she can look after it herself- she volunteered at RDA and had part loan experience, 3) having confidence in people at the yard to help her and in my daughter to ask for help, 4) knowing my daughter is a cautious rider. i wasn’t ready to buy, it just happened that the right pony came along and I realised if I don’t go for it I’ll never do it :)
 
Top