on lead, off lead, what to do

Clodagh

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Unfortunately, SA, poorly controlled dogs have always been a problem and often the owners are blissfully unaware that their dog is a pain in the ar$e.

My mastiff is sociable and very tolerant but even she gets p1ssed off by ill mannered dogs.

And, while I am having a moan, I do not appreciate dogs climbing my legs - it isn't cute.
Absolutely right, I am never madly in love with other peoples dogs, espeically if they are smearing me in mud, nearly knocking me over or licking me. My Dad walks with two sticks and is very slow and wobbly, he was run into by a dog off lead on the pavement yesterday, he only didn't fall as he hit the garden wall. The lady laughed apparently and said 'Oh dear he's always doing things like that'.
 

skinnydipper

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Absolutely right, I am never madly in love with other peoples dogs, espeically if they are smearing me in mud, nearly knocking me over or licking me. My Dad walks with two sticks and is very slow and wobbly, he was run into by a dog off lead on the pavement yesterday, he only didn't fall as he hit the garden wall. The lady laughed apparently and said 'Oh dear he's always doing things like that'.
I hope your dad is okay, Clodagh. Even if he came through the encounter without physical injury it will have shaken his confidence.
 

blackcob

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Here I am, the vocal advocate for dogs-on-leads, having had one of mine off for the entirety of our walk today and come to think of it he was off all of yesterday's too. 😛 Hypocrite, boo, hiss!

From personal experience it's just that there's many dogs let off the lead that haven't earned that privilege by virtue of their behaviour, often in the belief that dogs must run free at all times and have a right to do so, or that other dogs are there for their entertainment or education, when actually this behaviour has a huge negative impact on other dogs and other people.
 

CorvusCorax

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I'm out a walk now, fast country road, high hedges, blind bends, sheep on both sides. A couple in front of me are letting a spaniel and terrier run about all over the place, struggling to get them back when a car approaches and just let them jump all over a woman in a really nice Helly Hansen duvet coat.
 

blackcob

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Yesterday I watched a dog run through a graveyard (which has signs saying dogs must be on leads), then cross the road to come and stare and posture at my dog who had with unfortunate timing just stopped for a crap so was a bit defenceless. When I told it to go away it ran back across the road to where a person was loading shopping into the back of their car, where it attempted to jump in and had to be shooed away. This finally prompted the owner to whistle at it, where it eventually followed him down the middle of the road, still off the lead.

The mind boggles. If these people had ever seen what happens when a dog meets a car...
 
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my collie cross is always off lead and is very obedient so i dont worry if i see another dog whether off or on lead as she will walk next to me. my 2 terriers are a little different and if i see someone with a dog on lead i put mine on as i dont want to be a member of the "its ok my dogs are friendly" club as i know its really annoying for them to jump all over someone else's dog ....so, saw a spaniel off lead coming towards me , left all mine off lead so they could say hello, as i got closer saw dog was on lead so i said, sorry i thought yours was off lead, she said he was but i put him on, so i said is he not ok with other dogs and she said he is absolutely fine, i put him on out of politeness and stalked off.

i was a bit confused anyone else think it was a bit odd or is it me?
I would not support this people need to train their dogs and keep on leads if they are difficult .
The issue is not dogs it’s people .

I would agree with you to a point, however, a lot of 'timid' dog owners are the ones causing the problems. I have a rather large black Lab who is off lead most of the time but is muzzled because he eats anything. He also got into a bit of a scrap when I first got him and although no harm was done I don't want to the run the risk of it happening again hence the muzzle has two uses.
When he's off the lead he will run up to most dogs and sniff them. That's all. But the timid owner sees the muzzle and freaks out, thinking an aggressive dog is on the loose. I'm also amazed by the amount of timid owners who scoop up their small dogs when they see mine coming or nervously tighten their leads. All they are doing is telling their dog there's something there to be scared of.
Dogs should be allowed to sniff each other and maybe tussle for superiority - it's their nature. If it's muzzled, there's not a lot of damage it can do if it were to break out into a scrap.

So I agree that it's often the owner and not the dog.
 
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I have two extremely friendly, well socialised dogs. There are signs requiring dogs to be on a leash at most of the places where I go walking. My dogs are never off lead in a public place and it drives me absolutely mad that people let their dogs run loose all over the place, generally have no control whatsoever and get shirty when I stop and ask them to leash their dogs.
I would agree with you to a point, however, a lot of 'timid' dog owners are the ones causing the problems. I have a rather large black Lab who is off lead most of the time but is muzzled because he eats anything. He also got into a bit of a scrap when I first got him and although no harm was done I don't want to the run the risk of it happening again hence the muzzle has two uses.
When he's off the lead he will run up to most dogs and sniff them. That's all. But the timid owner sees the muzzle and freaks out, thinking an aggressive dog is on the loose. I'm also amazed by the amount of timid owners who scoop up their small dogs when they see mine coming or nervously tighten their leads. All they are doing is telling their dog there's something there to be scared of.
Dogs should be allowed to sniff each other and maybe tussle for superiority - it's their nature. If it's muzzled, there's not a lot of damage it can do if it were to break out into a scrap.

So I agree that it's often the owner and not the dog.
 

Andie02

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I'm out a walk now, fast country road, high hedges, blind bends, sheep on both sides. A couple in front of me are letting a spaniel and terrier run about all over the place, struggling to get them back when a car approaches and just let them jump all over a woman in a really nice Helly Hansen duvet coat.
Frighteningly irresponsible isn't it !!!
 

Amymay

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I would agree with you to a point, however, a lot of 'timid' dog owners are the ones causing the problems. I have a rather large black Lab who is off lead most of the time but is muzzled because he eats anything. He also got into a bit of a scrap when I first got him and although no harm was done I don't want to the run the risk of it happening again hence the muzzle has two uses.
When he's off the lead he will run up to most dogs and sniff them. That's all. But the timid owner sees the muzzle and freaks out, thinking an aggressive dog is on the loose. I'm also amazed by the amount of timid owners who scoop up their small dogs when they see mine coming or nervously tighten their leads. All they are doing is telling their dog there's something there to be scared of.
Dogs should be allowed to sniff each other and maybe tussle for superiority - it's their nature. If it's muzzled, there's not a lot of damage it can do if it were to break out into a scrap.

So I agree that it's often the owner and not the dog.
You are p!$$!ng joking?

You are ABSOLUTELY the worst kind of owner. I’d scoop my dog up, and quite possibly boot yours.

Hopefully you’re a little troll. New off you trot.
 
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The yard, home or coal face.....
Dogs should be allowed to sniff each other and maybe tussle for superiority - it's their nature. If it's muzzled, there's not a lot of damage it can do if it were to break out into a scrap.
If you let your bloody dog not just come up loose, but also try and tustle with mine, its going to come out of it pretty badly, its owners like you that absolutely incense me 🤬🤬🤬🤬
 

Odyssey

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27 February 2018
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233
Sorry about going off track because this wasn't originally about dog theft but this just showed up on my Facebook page

https://doghorn.uk/fight-back#victim-before
Thanks for posting that. It's an excellent article, by far the most helpful and detailed that I've read. I've mentally prepared what I plan to do if my dog gets threatened/attacked again, and am doing the same in case God forbid I should ever find myself in this horrific situation. I'll be buying a red dye spray and a personal alarm too.
 

BBP

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If it's muzzled, there's not a lot of damage it can do if it were to break out into a scrap.
Sorry but this is bull***t. It was a muzzled dog that attacked mine. There were no physical injuries but the psychological damage was massive. ‘Timid’ owners generally become that way because they are sick of their dog being bait for a bully.
 

StableMum

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I would agree with you to a point, however, a lot of 'timid' dog owners are the ones causing the problems. I have a rather large black Lab who is off lead most of the time but is muzzled because he eats anything. He also got into a bit of a scrap when I first got him and although no harm was done I don't want to the run the risk of it happening again hence the muzzle has two uses.
When he's off the lead he will run up to most dogs and sniff them. That's all. But the timid owner sees the muzzle and freaks out, thinking an aggressive dog is on the loose. I'm also amazed by the amount of timid owners who scoop up their small dogs when they see mine coming or nervously tighten their leads. All they are doing is telling their dog there's something there to be scared of.
Dogs should be allowed to sniff each other and maybe tussle for superiority - it's their nature. If it's muzzled, there's not a lot of damage it can do if it were to break out into a scrap.

So I agree that it's often the owner and not the dog.
Wow, are you for real?
 

Ranyhyn

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I’ve skipped to the end of this because I got confused.
I think it’s fine what the other dog walker did.

And I just don’t get the new idea of socialisation-meaning that strange dogs should be actively looking to play with each other.

“Can he say hello”
They are saying hello Pamela. From here now kindly let me pass and get yourself a doll if you want to play schoolyard. *rant over*
 

CorvusCorax

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I do appreciate people asking though, rather than assuming/shouting 'HE'S FRIENDLY/JUST WANTS TO SAY HI/JUST PLAYING' from halfway across a field.

Therefore I can say 'sure' with one dog and 'no, not with this dog I'm afraid' with the other. And not 'MINE ISN'T/DOESN'T/THIS MAY NOT END WELL' 😂
 

Blazingsaddles

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I would agree with you to a point, however, a lot of 'timid' dog owners are the ones causing the problems. I have a rather large black Lab who is off lead most of the time but is muzzled because he eats anything. He also got into a bit of a scrap when I first got him and although no harm was done I don't want to the run the risk of it happening again hence the muzzle has two uses.
When he's off the lead he will run up to most dogs and sniff them. That's all. But the timid owner sees the muzzle and freaks out, thinking an aggressive dog is on the loose. I'm also amazed by the amount of timid owners who scoop up their small dogs when they see mine coming or nervously tighten their leads. All they are doing is telling their dog there's something there to be scared of.
Dogs should be allowed to sniff each other and maybe tussle for superiority - it's their nature. If it's muzzled, there's not a lot of damage it can do if it were to break out into a scrap.

So I agree that it's often the owner and not the dog.
Your dog is the equivalent of an ill mannered child running riot in a supermarket. A PITA.
 

blackcob

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Shropshire
Horrendous weather here today, the paths and fields were flooded earlier in the week but now they are impassable so resigned myself to an on-lead pavement walk around town. Still got beset by an off-lead dog shoving its nose up my dog's arse and being so persistent I had to push it away with my leg. I cannot understand it - it's a rural area but it's still a town with a honking great A-road going through it and, y'know, cars. 🙄
 

skinnydipper

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So today I am out with the big girl, not the dog in my avatar but a mastiff. When I say big, I don't have to bend at all to stroke her back.

I suddenly realise we are not alone. We have been joined by a small, orange ball of fluff - owner way behind. Not a peep from the owner, no attempt to recall.

Not an aggressive little thing, jumping round her legs in a playful way, and the big girl didn't mind, she would have been happy to play but mindful of the striking difference in size, I thought better of it. (one misplaced paw would have flattened it)

I could have continued with the orange fluff ball in tow but, out of politeness, I waited for the owner to finally reach us and retrieve her dog.

Guess what she said.

Yep, "He just wants to play".

I gave her a strained smile and said "You are lucky my dog is friendly, he will do it to the wrong dog one day".

Orange fluff's owner replied "I keep telling him but he doesn't listen". :rolleyes:

Give me strength.

Poor OH had to then listen to 5 minutes of me muttering to myself "I keep telling him but he doesn't listen"
 
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