Paid access to off road riding?

CrazyMare

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Joined
23 December 2005
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10,427
I'm just trying to information gather as to how existing paid access schemes are run.

IF you pay to access off road riding can you advise me of the following

Do you pay yearly, pay monthly or pay as you go?

If you pay as you go, is it a pay meter or paid online, or something different?

How are you identified as having paid your access fee whether that be yearly or pay as you go?

How large is the area of off road riding?

What is the yearly fee, monthly fee or pay as you ride fee?

Many thanks in advance
 
Joined
24 November 2010
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Buzzing about the south east
Windsor Park info here: Here
I havent had a pass for about 10 years, it's a bit pricey, especially as lots of cycles, dog walkers and nd runners.

I prefer the likes of farm rides. Local one has a 5.5 mile hilly route with intermittent xc fences (all with no need to jump if you dont want to). There is also an additional 3 mile loop with no fences to jump, if you cross a small road, which is about half way round/3 miles in, if you want.
Its £25 a visit, or £150 for 6 months and £250 a year. Cycles, pedestrians and dogs not permitted. No road work. Sign in on arrival, sign out on leaving.Owners keep an eye open as it's a working farm, open 9 to 4 for 7 days a week (have to leave course by 5pm unless pre arranged). Private parking, no public access anywhere.
 

pixie27

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18 August 2016
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447
I have two areas of paid off road riding near me. One is Windsor Great Park, goes without saying how big and amazing that is! I think (and stand to be corrected as never bought access for the Park) that it’s £250 a year and you wear a headband to identify you as a paid rider.

The other is much smaller but still has plenty of big hills, varying terrain, equestrian use only. Great ground, lots of canter/gallop spots. Few xc jumps too. That was I think £120 a year though as the year progresses it gets cheaper. You wear a hat band and give your vehicle reg/have a parking permit. You can also do ‘pay as you ride’ which I think is £10 a go and you give them your details. It’s a busy place so must be hard to police. Well worth the money though!
 

Follysmum

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15 February 2013
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1,329
I use one which has dedicated trails,tracks and field margins it is a farm estate £12.50 each time
safe car park at the estate with water facilities.

Another one I use is £15 per time or £250 per year for 8miles with Xc jumps
 
Joined
15 September 2010
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438
Location
East Sussex
We have forestry commission land, permits run by TROT (Toll Rises Off-road Trust). We pay £90 a year and get sent a hat band and membership card in a different colour each year. The permit allows us access to other forestry commission land as well, not just our local woods.
 

PeterNatt

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Joined
15 July 2003
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3,548
Location
London and Hertfordshire
..… and we have got miles and miles of free off road riding routes because we have a network of public rights of way of bridleway and byway status which will be there for future generations of riders to continue to use thanks to the hard work of numerous people that have got them placed on the definitive map of Hertfordshire. (The definitive map is the map where all public rights of way are recorded within a county).
 

Ceifer

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Joined
11 May 2014
Messages
497
I have two areas of paid off road riding near me. One is Windsor Great Park, goes without saying how big and amazing that is! I think (and stand to be corrected as never bought access for the Park) that it’s £250 a year and you wear a headband to identify you as a paid rider.

The other is much smaller but still has plenty of big hills, varying terrain, equestrian use only. Great ground, lots of canter/gallop spots. Few xc jumps too. That was I think £120 a year though as the year progresses it gets cheaper. You wear a hat band and give your vehicle reg/have a parking permit. You can also do ‘pay as you ride’ which I think is £10 a go and you give them your details. It’s a busy place so must be hard to police. Well worth the money though!
I had a pass for Windsor Great Park about 5 years ago. It was a tag you had on your saddle.

To be honest I thought it was a rip off.
It was about £250.00 maybe a little more and as mentioned above full of people with dogs, on bikes, pushchairs and of course horse drawn carriages. If it was sunny it was absolute carnage. In addition Certain routes were closed for filming tv shows and films or other events. I also stumbled across a random group of people doing some kind of war re-enactment. Which was great fun with my WB who had only ever done road work in the past.
I was also nervous that if you came off and your horse did a runner it could have been catastrophic. Unless you went in the deer park where it was enclosed but you could stumble on a large herd of deer.
Maybe I’m being a misery. But it certainly wasn’t the place to go if your horse wasn’t well behaved and used to busy areas.
 

Suechoccy

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Joined
19 December 2007
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933
Epping Forest (Corporation of London) covers 2500 hectares and has a massive network of horse riding routes and some free range riding too. Riding is available on quarterly or daily basis. Charges here: https://www.cityoflondon.gov.uk/thi...r-information/licences/Pages/horseriding.aspx Day-parking for horse boxes is at Chingford Plain carpark and the passes can be bought from adjacent golf club office.

Thetford Forest (Forestry Commission) is free to ride in and has massive network of horse riding routes. Safe parking (so your vehicle doesn't get nicked while you ride) is available at a couple of places - Widehams Farm near Bury St Edmunds charge £10 daily per vehicle, there's also a place at Santon Downham whose name I can't remember, who also charge £10 per vehicle. Both nice places to park with toilets.

There's TROT rides on the Dengie peninsula in Essex, I don't know how much.

I know of one farmer in Cambridgeshire who has a private toll ride scheme on his farm margins but I don't have details of costs or amount of routes.

Wimpole Hall (National Trust) used to do a day pass per rider for parking on the wide grass verge at/outside their property and giving riders access to a length of permissive bridleway which then links into the public bridleway network.

At other National Trust properties with public bridleway networks alongside, I've parked, displaying my National Trust membership car sticker in my window, parking discretely and choosing my parking time to be not when such a property is full of visitors, and gone for a nice ride and then bought a tea and cake in their cafe afterwards too.

Holkham Hall in Norfolk charge £12 for day parking in Queen Anne/Elizabeth Avenue from where you ride through the pines onto Holkham Beach. (went there last Friday, superb!)
 

Leo Walker

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Joined
19 July 2013
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9,107
Location
Northampton
..… and we have got miles and miles of free off road riding routes because we have a network of public rights of way of bridleway and byway status which will be there for future generations of riders to continue to use thanks to the hard work of numerous people that have got them placed on the definitive map of Hertfordshire. (The definitive map is the map where all public rights of way are recorded within a county).
You are clearly much luckier than me then!
 

Orangehorse

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25 November 2005
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9,674
TROT was originally developed to improve everyday hacking, rather than being a "destination" like a farm ride where you turn up and pay. The idea is that you pay an annual subscription so you can use ANY TROT ride, although the money mostly goes to the nearest route, and it depends on whether you can actually use it every day-ish for local hacking, or you have to box up to get there, the latter being the lower rate (unless the rules have changed lately).

There are several farm rides, toll routes scattered all over the country, usually arranged by one big estate and they have their own rules.

The idea of having routes over land owned by several different landowners started in East Anglia, then was developed further in Kent, where the roads are very busy, and narrow so extremely hazardous for riding. And this was after many years spent researching and opening up all the available bridlepaths. What I found when I was involved is that it MUST be rider-led, where there is a demand. If a ride is set up where only a couple of people want to use it, it won't generate enough income for the landowners and they won't put in the work to keep it in good condition so it ,becomes a bit of a hassle rather than generating income. Actually I found that the landowners thought it was a good idea, it was getting the money out of riders that was the hard part, many felt that they simply shouldn't have to pay to ride their horse over farmland.

There are routes in Kent of up to 20 miles incorporating bridlepaths, quiet lanes, farm land, downland to create pleasant rides. There is nothing nicer than riding inside a field, behind the hedge rather than out on the road with lorries and cars thundering past. TROT also administer the Forestry schemes in some places.

People can shout all they like about it being permissive, but sometimes you just have to find the best solution. How much does a Dressage class entry cost? If hacking is your thing, then surely some payment is worth it? The local farmers who were in the Permissive Bridlepath scheme under Countryside Stewardship did not keep the rides open when the payment stopped, despite being asked.
 
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