Picked up a rescue case last night

brbc

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Picked up a very very sweet cob mare early yesterday evening she has curled hoofs where she has not seen a farrier in god knows how long! The condition she was living in well I would not wish it upon my worse enemy!
Gave her a bath and pamper this morning and have left her in with hay.
Vet and farrier are coming first thing Monday.
Now I feed my 2 who get worked for about an hour a day schooling or hacking top spec balancer and chaff I'm tempted to give her some? What do you lovely people think?
Pictures will follow shortly!
 

Cragrat

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You don't say how much weight she has on her, or whether she was on grass.

Tbh, until vet has seen her, I would stick with good quality ad lib hay, fresh water, no or literally just a handful of grass, no hard feed, until you be sure what condition her digestive system / teeth are in.
 

brbc

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Sorry just realised that! She was on barley any grass amongst thorn bushes and no hay, but she has got some weight coverage.
 

Cragrat

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Sound like a 'good do-er' in which case if you increase her feed too much or too rapidly you could trigger laminitis. I would keep her on the hay. I would bet the decent hay and water will increase her weight nicely. And definitely no spring grass, unless the vet says other wise :)
 

_GG_

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Just hay and poor quality hay at that for the time being. If your hay is green, soak it. With feet like that already, overdoing good quality food can cause lots of problems, in the feet and gut. Definitely try not to give sugary treats like carrots, no matter how tempted you are. Just thing about low quality forage to get the gut working without overloading it.

Take it one day at a time. A lot of rescue horses that have been malnourished can go on for a long time, but when given decent food, can start to present issues. What we want is to make them all better...but what they need is a slow and steady approach to reintroducing things.

Well done and good luck xxx
 

Clodagh

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How lovely and well done. I would give her vits and mins in a handful of chaff and leave it at that. (and hay of course) And where are the pics!?
 
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