Pony tucked up, ulcers?

Joined
23 October 2019
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43
Pony had a visit from the physio a few weeks back, she commented that he was quite tucked up, when she was working on his hind end he would lift a leg and turn his head to pull a face at her as a pain response, after the session he seemed much better and I hadn't noticed anymore episodes until today, he has been stabled all day but still had hay left, upon picking up his nearside hind he snatched it away and slammed it down, then when I was rigging him and gently passing the straps around his offside hind he lifted it up as if he was threatening to kick.
He isn't Ridden currently, waiting on the saddle fitter so has done some walks in hand and seemed forward going enough and happy.
Physio is booked for day after saddle fitter, could he have ulcers or do you think there is definitely an issue with his hind end, he was sore in his withers at last visit. He is just telling me on a daily basis one way or another that he isn't happy, I just don't know what to try next, he is 19 and on one pracsend a day for PPID, bloods taken yesterday to check levels,
Thank you
 

ILuvCowparsely

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Pony had a visit from the physio a few weeks back, she commented that he was quite tucked up, when she was working on his hind end he would lift a leg and turn his head to pull a face at her as a pain response, after the session he seemed much better and I hadn't noticed anymore episodes until today, he has been stabled all day but still had hay left, upon picking up his nearside hind he snatched it away and slammed it down, then when I was rigging him and gently passing the straps around his offside hind he lifted it up as if he was threatening to kick.
He isn't Ridden currently, waiting on the saddle fitter so has done some walks in hand and seemed forward going enough and happy.
Physio is booked for day after saddle fitter, could he have ulcers or do you think there is definitely an issue with his hind end, he was sore in his withers at last visit. He is just telling me on a daily basis one way or another that he isn't happy, I just don't know what to try next, he is 19 and on one pracsend a day for PPID, bloods taken yesterday to check levels,
Thank you
Going on my pony who was similar, I did bloods which showed low albumin, and she now has IBD and was tucked up the other day as she ate something she should not which took a while to pass through. I would get get to do a thorough examination as they can go down hill fast, specially with winter approaching.
 

JanetGeorge

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At this stage, I would suspect hind gut ulcers (easy enough for vet to examine faeces for blood.) Although if that was it, I'd expect him to be iffy with the right hind! It might be something as silly as the most recent change in the weather. Have you noticed if he's 'better' or worse on a windy day? Is he happy and relaxed when turned out? And how is his appetite?
 

Muddywellies

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When mine has ulcers it shows more in her attitude - spooky, nappy, unwilling. Many people find their horses resent being brushed under the tummy and some become grumpy when being rugged. Also mine can be very girthy. If yours has no other symptoms, then what you're seeing doesn't sound typical of ulcers. Though to contradict that, you might scope and find ulcers (as so many horses have them) but I would be investigating whats causing them and why your horse is tucked up.
Basically it's a minefield, and you need a vet.
 
Joined
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Hard to say but did physio say any issues in that area where he was lifting leg? Is he eating ok?. Has he dropped weight at all?
She just mentioned he was a little sore on back end purely because of his response to her touch, he is quite slim at the moment but not worryingly skinny, he has has lost a bit of appetite for the last few days for his hay and bucket feed but I presumed he was just getting a belly full of grass overnight, plenty of droppings
 
Joined
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At this stage, I would suspect hind gut ulcers (easy enough for vet to examine faeces for blood.) Although if that was it, I'd expect him to be iffy with the right hind! It might be something as silly as the most recent change in the weather. Have you noticed if he's 'better' or worse on a windy day? Is he happy and relaxed when turned out? And how is his appetite?
The right hind is the one he doesn't like the rug strap passing around, seems happy on turnout, has his little companion with him, I noticed it yesterday after a particularly wet and windy night out in the rain so he could be cold, will see how he is later before turnout
 

JanetGeorge

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Shropshire/Worcs. borders
At this stage, I would suspect hind gut ulcers (easy enough for vet to examine faeces for blood.) Although if that was it, I'd expect him to be iffy with the right hind! It might be something as silly as the most recent change in the weather. Have you noticed if he's 'better' or worse on a windy day? Is he happy and relaxed when turned out? And how is his appetite?
 

WelshD

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I had my pony treated for ulcers earlier this year, he lacked topline and was stiff in his neck and sore in his back and pelvis. It turns out he was bracing himself against the pain and had been for some time - now the ulcers have been treated he is like a different pony, a better shape and the saddle fitter and physio are both astonished at the improvement, he is using himself better in his work and is even a completely different colour! I was sceptical about how much damage ulcers could do to a horse's physique and reluctant to accept that he may have them but my goodness I will never underestimate them ever again
 

sam72431

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I used to work at a racehorses rehab yard most of them do have ulcers. Best results from aloe Vera gel it's totally natural and won't do any harm if there are ulcers you could maybe try some?
 
Joined
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I had my pony treated for ulcers earlier this year, he lacked topline and was stiff in his neck and sore in his back and pelvis. It turns out he was bracing himself against the pain and had been for some time - now the ulcers have been treated he is like a different pony, a better shape and the saddle fitter and physio are both astonished at the improvement, he is using himself better in his work and is even a completely different colour! I was sceptical about how much damage ulcers could do to a horse's physique and reluctant to accept that he may have them but my goodness I will never underestimate them ever again
You are literally describing him! How have you resolved or medicated him? I'm waiting for the vet to call back with other blood results so will chat through with him
 

JanetGeorge

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I had my pony treated for ulcers earlier this year, he lacked topline and was stiff in his neck and sore in his back and pelvis. It turns out he was bracing himself against the pain and had been for some time - now the ulcers have been treated he is like a different pony, a better shape and the saddle fitter and physio are both astonished at the improvement, he is using himself better in his work and is even a completely different colour! I was sceptical about how much damage ulcers could do to a horse's physique and reluctant to accept that he may have them but my goodness I will never underestimate them ever again
WelshD: MANY years ago, I worked for one of the top trainers in Australia, mainly 2yo's. Around 70% of the horses had ulcers - treating them and trying to manage to avoid them was drummed into us. They were worked in the morning, and in the afternoon did at least 2 out of walking in hand, swimming, or turn out yards. And NEVER allowed to run out of hay. Then I didn't see any problems with them for YEARS! Just last year, I had one of my 'babies' sent back - she had alledgedly turned into a buckjumper after 2 years. Owner wanted me to fix and sell, sell as a brood mare or have her PTS. That was after TWO years - and the one thing she was insistent on was that she didn't want to lose ANY money! Well, we didn't quite manage that, but she was fixed in 6 weeks (just Acid Ease and living out was enough to cure the hind gut ulcers). Then there was some hacking and schooling in our manege and another local one, and swapping between riders. She was then sold (with full disclosure, of course) and after 12 months, new owner is VERY happy with her. I now keep a full container of Acid Ease in stock for any who show signs of 'questionable# behaviour. That mare's problems had started with an ill-fitting saddle pressing down on her withers, and then 'complicated' by lack of turnout and an exotic mix of 'fashionable' feed-stuffs. With me, she had grass, haylage, and JUST enough grazon and a teensy amount of Bailey's No.4 just to add the Acid Ease to. The hardest thing was persuading her that trotting up sound would NOT hurt - horses remember pain and do anything/everything necessary to avoid it so when she first started working, she was tense on being mounted and asked to move on! And then was 2/10ths lame on the right hind!
 

JanetGeorge

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Joined
25 June 2001
Messages
7,002
Location
Shropshire/Worcs. borders
I had my pony treated for ulcers earlier this year, he lacked topline and was stiff in his neck and sore in his back and pelvis. It turns out he was bracing himself against the pain and had been for some time - now the ulcers have been treated he is like a different pony, a better shape and the saddle fitter and physio are both astonished at the improvement, he is using himself better in his work and is even a completely different colour! I was sceptical about how much damage ulcers could do to a horse's physique and reluctant to accept that he may have them but my goodness I will never underestimate them ever again
WelshD: MANY years ago, I worked for one of the top trainers in Australia, mainly 2yo's. Around 70% of the horses had ulcers - treating them and trying to manage to avoid them was drummed into us. They were worked in the morning, and in the afternoon did at least 2 out of walking in hand, swimming, or turn out yards. And NEVER allowed to run out of hay. Then I didn't see any problems with them for YEARS! Just last year, I had one of my 'babies' sent back - she had alledgedly turned into a buckjumper after 2 years. Owner wanted me to fix and sell, sell as a brood mare or have her PTS. That was after TWO years - and the one thing she was insistent on was that she didn't want to lose ANY money! Well, we didn't quite manage that, but she was fixed in 6 weeks (just Acid Ease and living out was enough to cure the hind gut ulcers). Then there was some hacking and schooling in our manege and another local one, and swapping between riders. She was then sold (with full disclosure, of course) and after 12 months, new owner is VERY happy with her. I now keep a full container of Acid Ease in stock for any who show signs of 'questionable# behaviour. That mare's problems had started with an ill-fitting saddle pressing down on her withers, and then 'complicated' by lack of turnout and an exotic mix of 'fashionable' feed-stuffs. With me, she had grass, haylage, and JUST enough grazon and a teensy amount of Bailey's No.4 just to add the Acid Ease to. The hardest thing was persuading her that trotting up sound would NOT hurt - horses remember pain and do anything/everything necessary to avoid it so when she first started working, she was tense on being mounted and asked to move on! And then was 2/10ths lame on the right hind!
 
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