Possible New Horse, lamintis people advice needed - Also in Vets

cornwallexracers

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I’ve got a bit of a ‘what would you do’ type question, and hopefully the laminitis experts can give me some advice please?
The back story is that after a nasty experience with another horse I’ve not really had the confidence to compete for a couple of years, and with my youngster coming on now and my older horse going into retirement, I’ve been looking for a nice competition schoolmaster to get me back into the swing of things (gently).
A friend of the family has a nice 13yo gelding who has evented previously (11 BE points), however, she put him on loan a couple of years back when she had her first baby to someone and basically it was a complete disaster, they talked the talk, shall we say but couldn’t walk the walk, and the horse ended up being thrown into a field where it became massively overweight and got laminitis, when the ‘competitive’ daughter it had been loaned for couldn’t be bothered.
The family friend got him back, dieted him down (150kg off), got him sound and he’s been in work for a while, nothing competitive, but she’s now expecting baby No 2, so won’t have the time to dedicate to riding him regularly, so has asked if I would be interested as she has known me and my family for a long time and I would hope know that I would take very good care of him.
I am really tempted, he’s lovely and fits the bill completely, but I’ve never had a horse which has had laminitis in the 25 odd years I’ve had horses, so I have no experience of managing one as obviously it’s something which once they’ve had can be set off again, and the more I read about laminitic management, the more I am confused! It’s been three and a half years since the original laminitis, and there was no rotation, he’s been sound ever since, with the exception of one bruised sole.
I would love to take him on, ideally the plan would be to get to know him for a couple of months while I get him fit to compete (predominantly local ODE’s) for 12-18 months and then if things go really well think about going BE, it wouldn’t be a case of heavy competing at all.
So really, my questions are (and I apologise if any of these seem stupid, but I’m trying to increase my knowledge so that I can make an informed decision) have any of you ever had a horse that had been laminitic that then went on to compete, and were there any ongoing or recurring issues?
Would you take on a horse which has previously had laminitis? What things are absolute need to knows? How do you best manage a previously laminitic horse, except for the obvious keeping weight off? Do you graze at night, or day in summer, etc etc!
Sorry for all the questions, but it’s so confusing once you get into reading about the condition, that I feel more confused now than ever!
 

eggs

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As it sounds as though this would be a loan rather than a purchase I would be tempted to go ahead if I were you. Are you able to keep the horse at his current yard? It sounds as though his routine there works for him.

You will need to be very vigilant at laminitis is a horrible disease to deal with but given that he has had no relapse since the first episode there is every chance that with the correct management he shouldn't have a problem in the future. There was an article I read just the other day that said that the best time to turn laminitics out on English grasses is 2.30 in the afternoon. We avoid turning out on frosty grass and regular check that there are no strong pulses in the feet.
 

Goldenstar

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If it's a loan in I would seriously consider going for it .
You need to think about where you are going to keep him from a prevention type view is it suitable and easy to give him a nice life .
And does your lifestyle mean you can give regular consistent work especially in summer .
Can you get someone to ride if you have to work away or go on holiday .
Ask your self all these questions
Learn about the laminitis so you good insight into what your taking on and talk to the owner about how they have managed it .
 

Dusty M Yeti

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It sounds as tho his owner has managed his condition very successfully so I would quiz her on her routine, feeding etc and stick as closely to that as possible. No relapses in three years, and no rotation from the original diagnosis is very positive.

I would absolutely consider taking this horse on if he ticks every box!
 

windand rain

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Sounds like a good deal to me too. Laminitis from being overweight is very simple to control you just have to work first and feed accordingly afterwards so every time you up the level of work you can then if necessary up the feed, Stick to a no sugar starch diet and you wont go far wrong. Another vote for keeping his management the same though and it will be fine Only problem starts if he develops a metabolic disorder and become chronically laminitic
 

cornwallexracers

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Thanks for your thoughts, he's currently on a high fibre diet (safe and sound and some fibre cubes, the minimum he needs, no molasses etc) he's shod every five weeks, and out at grass from 7.30am to 4pm year round, and it seems to work for him. Apparently in the summer he wears a grazing muzzle if there's too much grass, and isn't turned out until a frost has melted. I know the thinking is that grazing at night is best, but I'm undecided about it, perhaps its just me can't get my head around turning a horse out for longer on grass when they are susceptible, but I suppose it makes sense if you consider that the grass isn't producing sugars at night, I'm just not sure how you'd transition. He will have to move to our yard as I have two others, so keeping them at different places just isn't practical, we've not been there long ourselves, so I am wondering if he would be best kept on his current routine (in at night, out at day) for this year until I can suss out what the grass situation is like here.
 

NOISYGIRL

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Can't you manage him how his owner is managing him? What is she doing ? She should tell you his routine and what and how she is looking after him, feed etc and I'd be inclined to speak to his vet to see if competing is a good idea, I thought impact and sometimes bring on an attack
 

cornwallexracers

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I would be managing him exactly as his owner is at present, as stated above, high fibre diet, shod every five weeks, out at grass from 7.30am to 4pm year round, grazing muzzle if there's too much grass in the summer and isn't turned out until a frost has melted in winter. The only possible difference would be looking to graze overnight rather than during the day because of the lower fructans in the grass, but as yet I'm undecided on this as I don't really know what the grass situation is like at our yard as we've not been there long. He's was passed as sound by a vet who said he is fine to work and is happily in work at present, I wouldn't intend to compete him on unsuitable ground any more than I would any other horse, i.e not at all, so I would hope that concussion related laminitis shouldn't be an issue for him, but it is something I would be very aware of.
 

peaceandquiet1

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I would go for it, the original attack had an obvious cause, which you know how to manage. I don't see why he should be more susceptible to concussive laminitis than any other horse-and I have had experience of this when my mare jumped out of her field on to hard ground.
 

MuddyTB

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I agree with the above post. The one attack happened when he had very poor management and was overweight. With sensible care and awareness of his weight there is no reason he should get it again. No rotation and no further attacks mean he's not a chronic sufferer.

My 15hh native cross was prone to laminitis in spring, but as long as we kept an eye on him and fenced his paddock to a small, quite bare area early on he avoided any problems. He lived out 24/7 and used to jump all the time and was fine. It sounds like this case should be manageable.
 
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