Rant - The Current Dog 'Pandemic'

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It feels as though everywhere I turn at the moment, the dog breeding and owning world is a complete mess..

The dogs we breed today are a mess.. So many can't breathe, have skin issues and horrible hip/elbow dysplasia as if they're merle we'll let them have as many litters as humanly possible, regardless of health scores or temperament.

Some crosses I have seen have just been moronic - like a Great Dane/Cane Corso, what normal human who lives in a normal English Town needs a dog like that?! Someone I know has just bought a Cane Corso/Tibetan Mastiff cross in a small house with a young child. She also breeds toy poodles which seem to be sold on how small they can get them, and she is forever posting about how sad she is to have lost one as it fell off a step and smashed all it's legs into pieces, I assume as their bones are so small and fragile they can't withstand it. They're having 1-2 puppies from a bitch and constantly traumatic births, yet she is lauded by all of the other breeders on her posts - to me that would be a sign that the line needs to stop there.

There is a pandemic in itself of people buying inappropriate dogs and something needs to be done about it.. I often see a very early 20's lad with 2 Malinois for gods sake - and they are unruly at best. I am surrounded by dog groomers which won't take walk ins, or doodles as they are either too busy or they are sick of people lambasting their business because their dog needed a full shave as it was completely matted. I also seem to have a Facebook page full of dog with cropped ears, which is becoming more and more popular in the UK (I have lots of boxing contacts on my social media as I was involved in the sport, those two things may be linked).

Don't even get me started on the 'pocket bullys' which are becoming a terrifying trend and which also can't bloody move.

Sorry - rant over!
 

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CorvusCorax

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I was asked to help rehome two Malinois in the space of five days. A 10 month old slated to be PTS because his owner stuck his hand into the middle of a scrap with a smaller dog and his missus demanded it be euthanised 🙄 and a two year old dumped by a man on his ex who has to leave the dog 7 hours a day.

Not even my breed and there are very poor examples being bred indiscriminately by people who have no idea what they're doing, selling to people who have no idea what they're taking on.
 

conniegirl

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a two year old dumped by a man on his ex who has to leave the dog 7 hours a day.
This one is understandable why she wants to rehome, the ex is the problem not her.

The dog that attacked daisy last year has not been seen in months. I suspect it has been rehomed or worse! It was very easy to see that it was a lockdown dog bought by first time owners, black spaniel type that was overexcited, hauling them all over the place and when it went after daisy it was apparently my fault that they couldn’t control thier dog.

So I had to break up a dog fight whilst visibly pregnant, stopping my other dog from joining in (he will go to daisys defence) and being screeched at by a mad woman about how they were going to call the police! Its a good thing my dogs can be controlled and that i had thick leather country boots on!
Daisy has unfortunately been a little reactive since then though we have been working with other prelockdown local dog owners to get her feeling safe again.
 

Pearlsasinger

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It seems that the prices of pupppies are coming down and I have noticed that people seem to be having over-priced litters left. Sadly there are some 'lockdown pups' which are older now, 'for sale through no fault of his/her own', perhaps becasue no-one thought through what would happen when things got back to nearer normal.
 

CorvusCorax

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It seems that the prices of pupppies are coming down and I have noticed that people seem to be having over-priced litters left. Sadly there are some 'lockdown pups' which are older now, 'for sale through no fault of his/her own', perhaps becasue no-one thought through what would happen when things got back to nearer normal.
I know someone with six 10 week old GSD puppies still priced at 1k. They're 'OK' breeding (being charitable here), male has a basic qualification and health tests, don't really know anything about the female. Two litters of high showline breeding, generations of health tests also not selling. And then we had that ad last night for three crossbreds at 1800k, 'deposit secures'. Not, like, a good home or anything.....

FWIW an ex's dog will end their days with me or I will see to it that they get an excellent home. If a dog has been in my life and the other person can no longer look after it, I will try my best to help, not try and get it out the door ASAP/tomorrow to an unknown fate, especially a breed like that.
 

PurBee

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Mankind desperately needs to learn “Just because we can, doesn’t mean we should”
- especially when it comes to dna/breeding - those pics you posted of those poor dogs - it should be illegal to breed such a thing.

Making money from animals + novelty factor = highly immoral breeding. We’ve got laws dictating intricacies of our lives, yet laws are barren when it comes to animal breeding. 🤷‍♀️
 

bonny

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Mankind desperately needs to learn “Just because we can, doesn’t mean we should”
- especially when it comes to dna/breeding - those pics you posted of those poor dogs - it should be illegal to breed such a thing.

Making money from animals + novelty factor = highly immoral breeding. We’ve got laws dictating intricacies of our lives, yet laws are barren when it comes to animal breeding. 🤷‍♀️
The problem is dogs like in those awful photos are highly sort after and worth thousands of pounds.
 

TPO

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I know a couple with 3 cocker females and 1 dog. I don't know if they are KC registered but doubt all of the litters can be because they are back to back breeding the females.

They have never shown, trained or competed their breeding dogs in any sphere so not performance dogs.

They are an older (late 60s) "respectable" couple in a nice country house but essentially they are just puppy farmers.

Just had 11 pups from one litter and they are 2k each.

They had multiple litters through lockdown too and their place was going like a thoroughfare
 

Pearlsasinger

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We were only saying yesterday that the Kennel Club could do a lot more to improve breeding in the UK. Every pup that is KC reg should have parents that have been tested for everything that their parents are likely to have passed on to them, if thetests haven't been done, nomatter how good the breeding looks to be on the passport, the pups shouldn't be eligible to be registered. I know that wouldn't stop all dodgy breeding (Cockerppo's etc) but it would help. I was talking to someone looking for a pup who thought that if they were KC reg and 'vet health tested' that meant that the DNA, hip/eye, etc tests had been done.
The Lab pups that were £2,500 have been reduced by about £300 and they still have 6 left. There were plenty around at about £1k which I think is much more realistic. Our 2 yr olds cost us £800 each as pre-Covid pups.
 

PurBee

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I know someone with six 10 week old GSD puppies still priced at 1k. They're 'OK' breeding (being charitable here), male has a basic qualification and health tests, don't really know anything about the female. Two litters of high showline breeding, generations of health tests also not selling. And then we had that ad last night for three crossbreds at 1800k, 'deposit secures'. Not, like, a good home or anything.....

FWIW an ex's dog will end their days with me or I will see to it that they get an excellent home. If a dog has been in my life and the other person can no longer look after it, I will try my best to help, not try and get it out the door ASAP/tomorrow to an unknown fate, especially a breed like that.
My brother’s dog had been used to a rural active life with him for 7yrs - he then moved, got a gf and dog has ‘to go’ apparently due to new rental not accepting dogs (that turned out to be an untruth as he got another dog a while later at that rental). So i felt sorry for the dog going to a dog pound (returned to the charity he got him from) to probably be re-homed in surburban home, and offered him a home here on my farm. Dog was rapidly dumped on me without bed, food, lead etc - yet still, he’s now 17yrs old, this may be his last summer (he keeps bouncing back to vigorous life!) but he’s had a suitable home and therefore long active happy life for his breed and prior life conditioning.

I know someone who got a husky, and have struggled with it since it was a pup due to lack of time and right environment. Its a nightmare for them to take anywhere. Wont re-home despite it being obvious its needs arent being met.

Sadly, many dont realise the level of commitment animals require of us - thinking theyre like a toy that can be put in a box when not wanted for a walkabout, hug and fuss.
 

coblets

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It seems that the prices of pupppies are coming down and I have noticed that people seem to be having over-priced litters left. Sadly there are some 'lockdown pups' which are older now, 'for sale through no fault of his/her own', perhaps becasue no-one thought through what would happen when things got back to nearer normal.
I've seen a real increase in dogs around 8 months to a year old now being sold due to work commitments. I'm glad that people have recognised that their usual working hours aren't suitable for a dog but why did they have no foresight when they bought it?
 

skinnydipper

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I was asked to help rehome two Malinois in the space of five days. A 10 month old slated to be PTS because his owner stuck his hand into the middle of a scrap with a smaller dog and his missus demanded it be euthanised 🙄 and a two year old dumped by a man on his ex who has to leave the dog 7 hours a day.

Not even my breed and there are very poor examples being bred indiscriminately by people who have no idea what they're doing, selling to people who have no idea what they're taking on.

I've seen a number of GSDs, Mals, Dutch Herders up for rehoming, private and rescue organisations.

Original owner unable to fulfil dog's needs. No manners/boundaries. Training required. Needs an active/working home. Okay with other dogs after careful introduction - we all know what that's a euphemism for :rolleyes:. Likely to kill cats.

I doubt people are queuing up to take them on. (aside from cat killing it wouldn't put me off but thank goodness big dog fills the available space in our vehicle so I can't be tempted :D).
 
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The problem is dogs like in those awful photos are highly sort after and worth thousands of pounds.
They really are, and it stuns me. Really that animal is hardly even recognisable as a dog and it's a status symbol worth £1000's.

We were only saying yesterday that the Kennel Club could do a lot more to improve breeding in the UK.
I completely agree. You see the sh*te that comes through the showing circles under KC, especially those in America (not sure if still under KC, I'm not clued up on things over there) I have lost all faith in their accrediation also. Yes, health testing etc is a good thing to have to do, but their breed standards seem to change in line with the extremes which are being bred. The responsible thing for them to do would be to update the breed standard for Frenchies to having a long snout which allows them to breathe and so on and so forth. Having a dog win a prestigious dog show that can't even regulate it's own body temperature for long enough to have a photo with the trophy - just madness. (A pekinese)

People should have to be licensed to breed a dog, and owners should have to register to the licensing body to buy it. People should also have to undergo courses etc if they are to own a high drive dog like a Malinoise or a Cane Corso. All dogs should be banned from having cropped ears, rescues or otherwise (there are enough UK dog that need homes without importing 'rescues' from other countries, usually ill and untested - but that's another rant). If your cropped dog is going to be confiscated then you would think twice about importing it from a Romanian breeer to get around the laws.
 
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I've seen a real increase in dogs around 8 months to a year old now being sold due to work commitments. I'm glad that people have recognised that their usual working hours aren't suitable for a dog but why did they have no foresight when they bought it?
Unfortunately isn't not even foresight, it's selfishness. I want it so I'll get it. It's how the world is set up, you want something you can't afford? Finance. You want an animal and then change your mind? Chuck it in a rescue. You cant afford your living standard? Credit Cards. The world has changed and immediacy without regulation is the new normal, and scarily this is now extending to animals.
 
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A friend of mine was telling me about someone in the village who bred a litter of Cockerpoos. No idea if any health checks done. She sold them for £3k each. Totally mad but with prices like that you can see why people do it. Thankfully prices are noticeably dropping so fingers crossed things will start to improve. Just so sorry for all the indiscriminate pups already bred who will have health problems and/or poor homes.
 

PurBee

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I've seen a number of GSDs, Mals, Dutch Herders up for rehoming, private and rescue organisations.

Original owner unable to fulfil dog's needs. No manners/boundaries. Training required. Needs an active/working home. Okay with other dogs after careful introduction - we all know what that's a euphemism for :rolleyes:. Likely to kill cats.

I doubt people are queuing up to take them on. (aside from cat killing it wouldn't put me off but thank goodness big dog fills the available space in our vehicle so I can't be tempted :D).
Youre right - so many ads fit that description. Sometimes a challenge to re-train bad early conditioning, quite a job to take on.

My brother’s dog, upon literally getting out of his car here, immediately chased one of my 3 cats out the house
”oh brother, you could have told me he chases everything and i would have made sure cats were sectioned off” (he knew i had cats)
He told me dog trained, comes when called etc etc….the reality was somewhat different!

Now the cats sleep with that dog…but it was quite the journey getting that dog ‘trained’.
 

blackcob

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My dog pandemic gripe is that I'm finding walks stressful when you have to second guess other dog owners all the time, and I don't know if it's the increasing numbers, lockdown puppies hitting adolescence or that people just don't give a damn about how their dog's behaviour impacts on others.

Is that enormous dog bounding up and ignoring its owner's call going to knock my old girl off her feet, am I going to get bitten if I hold the collar of the dog who is currently climbing my leg trying to get in my treat pocket while my dog is on the cusp of exploding on the lead behind me, should I say something to the man who has just hit it now he's got it back, is that dog who's been hupped into a sit on the verge going to break its stay and splat my dog like it did the last time we met it...
 

SAujla

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I know someone with six 10 week old GSD puppies still priced at 1k. They're 'OK' breeding (being charitable here), male has a basic qualification and health tests, don't really know anything about the female. Two litters of high showline breeding, generations of health tests also not selling. And then we had that ad last night for three crossbreds at 1800k, 'deposit secures'. Not, like, a good home or anything.....

FWIW an ex's dog will end their days with me or I will see to it that they get an excellent home. If a dog has been in my life and the other person can no longer look after it, I will try my best to help, not try and get it out the door ASAP/tomorrow to an unknown fate, especially a breed like that.
Genuinely wondering what will the breeder do if they can't sell them? Multiple 10 week old puppies don't strike me as being easy to deal with no matter the breed
 

CorvusCorax

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Genuinely wondering what will the breeder do if they can't sell them? Multiple 10 week old puppies don't strike me as being easy to deal with no matter the breed
Get all their trouser legs eaten, by the sounds of it.

There is another guy who prices his way too high, can't sell, then ships them in twos and threes off to the USA where they become 'lAw eNforCemEnt k9s'. One of the purchasers is quite well known for his company/handlers setting dogs on indigenous people protesting pipelines through their sacred lands. Nice.
 

SAujla

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Get all their trouser legs eaten, by the sounds of it.

There is another guy who prices his way too high, can't sell, then ships them in twos and threes off to the USA where they become 'lAw eNforCemEnt k9s'. One of the purchasers is quite well known for his company/handlers setting dogs on indigenous people protesting pipelines through their sacred lands. Nice.
That all sounds very bleak. Poor pups.

The combination of people going back to work and the lockdown puppies hitting adolescence is is a rough one. I think many owners don't even know adolescence is a thing with dogs, I will admit I didn't until I did research.
 

Karran

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we have dogs like the pics in my local parks. They remind me of my tortoise in build and shape as they scrabble along. All very strange colours and cropped ears. I also know of a cane corso being mated with a boxer which i'm not 100% convinced about!
 
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a friend keeps ‘accidentally’ breeding his bitch, because he’s a too lazy to have her or the dog neutered. He has no trouble selling puppies for £500. Neither of the parents have ever been near a vets, let alone the puppies.
God, that's depressing - he sounds like a moron. But where there's a market there will be supply..

A boxer and a Cane Corso is very odd.. I know what you mean about the turtles though! That's exactly it.
 

DressageCob

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It's awful. I'm seeing more and more dogs with cropped ears. Either it is being done illegally in the UK or they are being imported. People don't seem to care either way.

Then you have the atrocious frog dogs, the exotic bullies who look like footstools and breathe like an 80 year old smoker with COPD.

Then you have the people willing to spend thousands on "designer cross breeds" which do nothing to improve either source breed, no health testing, no regulation and no real care about anything but profit. Everywhere you turn there is another cockerpoo or labradoodle or golden doodle. Now you have all the other doodles which are increasing in popularity, particularly the giant ones like Bernedoodles and St Bernadoodles. I don't understand the hype and I really think it needs regulating some way. Seeing the same people breeding dogs again and again, from the same bitches, is just depressing.

I'd love it to be you have to have a licence and pass exams to breed dogs. That should stop all the pet people saying "Bella is such a nice girl she just needs to have puppies" or "Luna really wants to be a mum".
 

millikins

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I'm torn, I think it's extremely sad when we lose breeds whether that is dogs or rare breed livestock but surely to some extent it's an evolution of the job the animal is required to do fitting with modern human lifestyle? I rather like cockerpoos, a bit scatty but small, friendly less shedding family dogs are in demand. I adore rottie crosses, I'm on my third. When looking I tried rescues, the usual issues with them, and then preloved. That was depressing, so many large, ill mannered animals some even admitting they were being rehomed because they'd bitten. I'm not risking something that size with no respect for humans so ended up with a Cyprus rescue who is an absolute delight.
I think we have a problem in this country with an inability to raise animals or children with any manners, not all obviously but a significant number.
 
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I'm torn, I think it's extremely sad when we lose breeds whether that is dogs or rare breed livestock but surely to some extent it's an evolution of the job the animal is required to do fitting with modern human lifestyle? I rather like cockerpoos, a bit scatty but small, friendly less shedding family dogs are in demand. I adore rottie crosses, I'm on my third. When looking I tried rescues, the usual issues with them, and then preloved. That was depressing, so many large, ill mannered animals some even admitting they were being rehomed because they'd bitten. I'm not risking something that size with no respect for humans so ended up with a Cyprus rescue who is an absolute delight.
I think we have a problem in this country with an inability to raise animals or children with any manners, not all obviously but a significant number.
You're thinking of the more positive (albeit completely unneccesary imo) example of current day breeding. What jobs have we bred dogs that look like this to do...? And they are all examples that many posters will see regularly out and about, I know I do.

Playing devils advocate: you liked your Rottie crosses, I love Rotties too, but why would you cross a breed with so many health issues with another breed indescriminately. At best you may breed some health issues out, at worst you get a cross with health issues from both sides.

I also think that you risk getting a dog from Cyprus with the same issues as UK rescues, but that obviously depends on the quality of rescue you deal with. I know a few foreign rescues who have/could have been down right dangerous through fear, not to mention other mental ill effects of years on the streets
 

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CorvusCorax

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All the dachshunds I see out and about are very robust little dogs. They still do working tests/send them down holes in Germany but I guess that it unpalatable for a lot of people, the working wirehairs are smashing. What happens when what they are bred for becomes obsolete? Should the breed die out too? That would mean a lot of the native British breeds.

There are a lot of cockerpoos with resource guarding issues and extreme environmental sensitivities, which are not at all ideal in a busy family home.
 
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All the dachshunds I see out and about are very robust little dogs. They still do working tests/send them down holes in Germany but I guess that it unpalatable for a lot of people, the working wirehairs are smashing. What happens when what they are bred for becomes obsolete? Should the breed die out too?
I think it's a very fine line though, I have included the one I have above as it's chest is maybe an inch of the floor which to me just is wrong. If a dog is scuppered by a 20cm step then is it a useful dog? It certainly wouldn't make it down a hole of any description... I also think the trend now is to breed them as long as possible, whcih again just results in spinal issues. The useful, good example of the breed are being pushed out by the low, long and crooked legged versions that are now ten a penny.

I do love the wirehairs though, they're great little dogs.
 
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