Rearing Yearling.... How to stop it?

Rachelmc

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Hello,



This is my first post so I’m sorry if I miss anything out. I bought a yearling colt two weeks ago, he was sold as the owners mares were coming into season and having no separate grazing for him so he is coltish and planned to geld him in the autumn. I understand the gelding takes time to calm them down. He was walking out beautifully at first and was a dope on a rope, but suddenly he started to rear for no reason within a week of having him. He is brave and doesn’t spook at much so I’m sure it’s not fear. He also started to mount me in the field if I turned my back on him. His behaviour has warranted him being gelded and yesterday the deed was done.

This morning I walked him out in hand and he was up before long but I think that was partly because of excitement of being out of his box this time. He only seems to rear when heis being led out.
Now, I was planning on turning him back out today and just leaving him to it, without walks and much fuss until his hormones have calmed down in 4-6 weeks time and then bit him and walk out again. Or should I just work through it? He doesn’t respect personal space so when he is too close I push him away. And he also nips but he is learning the word ‘NO’ and will lick and chew.


When he does rear I give him a sharp tug on the rope and say loud and Clear ‘NO’ and he acts shocked and again will lick and chew and then walks on like nothing happened until he goes up again.

Any advice?

 
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Patterdale

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Turn him out and leave him alone to get used to his new (lack of) hormones.
Keep going and chatting to him but no treats etc.

When you next go to lead him in, choose a hot lazy day and keep it all relaxed. He will more than likely have totally calmed down.

If he DOES try to rear, try to anticipate it, turn a tight circle to stop him going up then send him on quickly forward with the end of the rope/stick. Then praise good walking.

Don't do too much though with babies. They are generally better left for 90% of the time, handled 10% IMO.
 

Rachelmc

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Thank you both, Maybe I have done a little too much. He is having a daily feed at the moment, shall I stop? He has a lot of good grass!
 

Patterdale

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Thank you both, Maybe I have done a little too much. He is having a daily feed at the moment, shall I stop? He has a lot of good grass!

Is he seriously underweight?
Is he having medication?

If not, then yes, stop! Just let him be, honestly :)
The more faffing you do, you're just making a rod for your own back.

Also, if he's just had a major upheaval (moved home, left his friends, had his nuts off) and ADDED to that was until yesterday entire, on good spring grass AND having a feed, there's really no wonder he was playing up. In the nicest possible way!

Turn out, cut the feed, and all take a deep breath :)
 

Patterdale

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Thank you both, Maybe I have done a little too much. He is having a daily feed at the moment, shall I stop? He has a lot of good grass!

Is he seriously underweight?
Is he having medication?

If not, then yes, stop! Just let him be, honestly :)
The more faffing you do, you're just making a rod for your own back.

Also, if he's just had a major upheaval (moved home, left his friends, had his nuts off) and ADDED to that was until yesterday entire, on good spring grass AND having a feed, there's really no wonder he was playing up. In the nicest possible way!

Turn out, cut the feed, and all take a deep breath :)
 

Sandstone1

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I would not be feeding unless he really needs it. What breed is he? Also has he got companions? Other youngsters will let him play. Also a older gelding might help teach him some manners. Try reading sarah westons book. No fear no force. It's really good and will help you.
 

kc100

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I've just got my yearling a week ago (well a week yesterday) - he's not fed anything other than grass as he's out 24/7. I posted a question a few days ago on yearlings and feeding (I was feeling a bit like a bad mum for not feeding him!) but everyone told me not to feed him as grass is more than enough providing they are out 24/7. A lot of feeds can contain too much protein apparently which cause the baby to grow too quick causing health issues in the future, so grass alone definitely sounds like the best option.

If I were you I'd leave him alone for a few weeks now and let him settle down. Is he out with a herd? He should ideally be turned out with others, especially now he is gelded, and the ideal herd would be an older horse and a youngster, so he learns manners from the older horse and gets to play with the baby. Now I havent got this ideal scenario, but he is turned out with an older mare and an older gelding, who have adopted him and he is learning great manners from them as they are older and sensible.

I've been very lucky that my boy has been perfect manners wise since I got him, he leads really well, catches pretty well, and has learnt to tie up and stand relatively easily. I've handled him quite a lot in this first week just to see what he can and cant do (for example if I needed the vet I wanted to see if he would stand tied up etc). But now he has mastered a lot of basics in a short time, I'm going to cut down the amount he is handled (maybe twice a week from now on) and leave him to be a baby.

I think your fella sounds like he is just full of hormones, probably full of beans from the hard feed which he doesnt need, and a bit over-excited about being in a new place. Get him out in a herd if he isnt already, and let the other horses teach him some manners. Dont try and handle him for a few weeks, but go and see him and give him a scratch just to get him used to you a bit more.
 

Exploding Chestnuts

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I can't tell from a post, but with a bold colt , keep the lead rope long and give him a rap if he gets uppish, but if he is just showing off, just ignore his nonsense.
Agree he needs to be kept with others.
 

Rachelmc

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Cut the food out and turned him out. Today just 3 days after gelding the change in him is amazing! Much more chilled, less aggressive and happy for a good fuss and fly spray to keep the fly's away from his wounds.

He currently is on his own as he kept jumping out the field with the slightest hint of being challenged. He can see them and is quite happy. I will try again at a later date
 
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