Recommendations for getting rid of established proud flesh

stimpy

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I have a horse who sustained a horrible pastern injury two months ago. Short version of the story is that he's not lame and the wound is healing well but he now has a dreadful amount of proud flesh, imagine a large banana sitting around his pastern, that's what we've been left with. He has been under the vet the whole time, has been treated with a gel that is supposed to reduce proud flesh whilst promoting healing, and has had some removed surgically, but it seems to grow back faster than we can get rid of it and to be honest I have run out of patience. It has been peeling off layer by layer but each time a layer peels off we have a weeping surface exposed for around 12 hours and the flies are now bothering it. He is a field ornament so I'm not looking for an aesthetic fix but he is the sort of dingbat who will knock it off/damage it if I don't reduce the size of it.

So, I am looking for ideas to get rid of the existing proud flesh. The vet wanted to avoid any of the caustic approaches as this would mean it had to be bandaged and he wanted the wound open to the air to promote healing but to be honest the peeling off layer by layer approach just hasn't worked and I'm about to run out of the no longer available gel anyway.

I have avoided using honey as I believe that can cause granulation tissue, is that right? Any other over -the-counter stuff that I can use? I was looking at Equaide which makes amazing claims, has anyone used it?
 

PorkChop

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I have had amazing results with Equaide, its a clay type product, it seems too good to be true but I used it on my mares leg when she collided with our landrover and needed countless stitches. One area was starting to grow proud flesh and I thought I would use this product instead of the serious stuff from the Vets.

Since then I have used on all sorts of wounds, the great thing is it stops the flies getting to it, which is the disadvantage of honey.
 

stimpy

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540
I have had amazing results with Equaide, its a clay type product, it seems too good to be true but I used it on my mares leg when she collided with our landrover and needed countless stitches. One area was starting to grow proud flesh and I thought I would use this product instead of the serious stuff from the Vets.

Since then I have used on all sorts of wounds, the great thing is it stops the flies getting to it, which is the disadvantage of honey.

Thanks LJR for the recommendation, it does seem too good to be true so it's very interesting to hear that it works! So you paint it on but it sets like clay, is that right? Do you have to keep the area bandaged?
 

stimpy

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I'm very interested in this too. My mares wound has loads of proud flesh and may need another trim :(

I went ahead and bought some Equaide and have been using it for about two weeks. I am having to bandage as the wound is way taller than their recommendation for when you can leave it unbandaged. I think it is helping, it does (very) gradually seem to be getting flatter. When I take the bandage off the layer of the clay comes off and the flesh underneath is very pale and sort of dead looking. I then wash with hibiscrub quite vigorously until it looks red and there is some surface bleeding and then plaster the clay on again and rebandage. I changed the bandage every 2 days for the first 4 times, now I am stretching to every 3 days. It's not the nicest job in the world but luckily my boy doesn't mind any of this so it's just a case of endless supplies of melolin pads and vet wrap...
 

PorkChop

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Sorry only just seen your questions, though it sounds like you have it all under control. I didn't bandage as the wound was right on the front of the fetlock. I am really glad that it is working, albeit slowly, how long do you think before you can do away with the bandaging? Costs a small fortune doesn't it!
 

stimpy

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Sorry only just seen your questions, though it sounds like you have it all under control.

Not sure I'd go that far! ;)

I didn't bandage as the wound was right on the front of the fetlock. I am really glad that it is working, albeit slowly, how long do you think before you can do away with the bandaging? Costs a small fortune doesn't it!

His wound is so massive that I didn't dare not bandage after reading the instructions. Obviously as it's on his coronet I have to bandage right up over his fetlock and halfway up his leg for it to stay secure (deep joy) and I can't get two goes out of one vet wrap which is what I was hoping. :rolleyes:

Anyway, I thought I might do another week of bandaging and then try a few days unbandaged to see what happens. At least this thread waking up has reminded me to order more melolin pads!
 

PorkChop

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Fair enough, sounds like quite a job, sigh, they don't like us to shirk our responsibilities do they!
 

lelabell

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The instructions say that you need to bandage if it is more than 1/2 inch thick. My boy's is about 2 inches thick :(

So as in how much it sticks out from the actual leg? Not how big the proud flesh is (width or circumference wise?)
 

stimpy

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So as in how much it sticks out from the actual leg? Not how big the proud flesh is (width or circumference wise?)

I think so, I take it to mean how proud it is from normal skin level.
 
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