recovering laminitic

tel

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Hiya my horse came down with lami end Aug and has been on box rest til last week and vet said after he viewed him walk out round yard he could start to come out to muck out and have an hours turn out initially on sedalin. He's only been out once as the weather then turned and been too icy to get to the field and been out a few times to muck out but spooked twice badly and jumped on the concrete. His pedal bones had rotated a bit and he damaged his laminae initially. He seems pottery on left turns now and was not when walked out with the vet. I am going to get vet back this week but would a few jumps cause the bone to move ? Am worrying his spooks have already damaged the healing. He's quite stiff from being in as well and our yard is not great as the concrete is unlevel and breaking up in places so may not help things. I think I will keep in longer so he heals more. He does not seem in pain or uncomforable and turns in his box ok (albeit it soft deep shaving so easier). Been off bute for 2 months. Feeling very sick after we have done so well to date
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AngieandBen

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My deepest sympathy, I have a shetland on box rest due to laminitis atm
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Don't really know about your case, haven't had any dealings with rotated pedal bone, someone on here will though I'm sure!

Thas a long time for box rest, I presume you've had x rays done?

Sending hugs as I know how awful it is
 

susannita

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Don't panic!! Difficult I know!! I have a laminitic whose trigger is actually extreme cold so this is the worst time of year for us! Your horse has been drug free for over 2 months and in normal circumstances would have expected him out some weeks ago (however every case is different so generalisations don't help)

The horses feet have been cushioned for months on deep shavings and they will no doubt be sensitve now outside of that envrionment. If your horse has no shoes on i would recommend trying to get some hoof boots with pads in to help protect the soles of his feet from bruising by the ice/concrete. You need to try to get the circulation back to normal in the feet and turnout will help that - be really careful with the frozen/frostygrass (may even be worth a grazing muzzle - seems crazy in this weather I know!)

x-rays help a lot and if you are insured i would actually ask for them every time the vet comes out (at least monthly) until the end of your cover. It is the only real way you know what is going on (the feet can change/heal) remakably quickly. The xrays will ensure your farrier /vet deal with what is actaully happeneing rather than what they *think* is happening!

HTHs!!
 

tel

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Thank you both. Yes had x rays at start of the problem and he had heart bars on just after. Farrier and vet been amazed as apart from day 1 when he uncomfy to walk he not been over sensitive on feet even to shoe. He was on 4 butes for a week, then two for a month then none for 2 months. Vet did not feel another x ray needed but think will get done as still got the insurance til July. It all started after a fall end July where he had tendonitis and then a month later got lami believed to be seconadry laminitis due to the previos injury rather than grass related etc.
 

susannita

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If he has shoes on definitely x-ray monthly, we have experimented with rubber soleguard and plastic rims and the difference between applications on the same day was amazing (x-raying before and after application (and no i now have no insurance....!!!) Your farrier is working blind without them and as you have cover insist the vet does them, they help create a really good record of what is going on (I have xrays for this horse from 7 years ago from a different issue which have been incredibly useful which has shown that previous mis-diagnosis may have caused all this. I also insist on taking the x-rays (either film/cd), I have paid for them and I therefore want them!)

just out of interest have you had any bloods done. Its always useful to have an understanding of what is going on (insulin/cortisol levels especially in laminitis cases) your vet will probably try to fob you off but again whilst on insurance it is absolutely worth running them. Unfortunately no matter what the original cause laminitic attacks tend not to be one offs, the more you can do to understand what the triggers/outcomes are the better, more so when the insurance is footing the bill! you can then use this info to manage your horse going forward!
 

Booga22

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I agree with Avenger, I get my mare's feet x-rayed every 3 months roughly in order to keep an eye on the pedal bone, and then my farrier can also ensure the angle of her feet is corret and trim accordingly. If your little is still sore with movement, then restrict the walking unttl they seem more comfortable again, and then build it up again really slowly - I still keep a diary of my girl's progress/any changes and she went down with ther worst bout January 2008 completely out of the blue.

Blood tests are a really good idea, mine was tested last year and altho she didn't show up then as having probs, we tetsed again just before Christmas as he went footy again and as we didn't know what her trigger was, and she has been diagnosed as being Insulin resistant and having Equine Metabolic Syndrome. Sounds worse than it is and it is manageable with diet, drugs and exercise. Mine goes out with a grazing muzzle and soaked hay and has adapted to this well.

It's so easy to feel deflated - ur human and you love your horse, just keep your chin up, persevere and give your guy a huge hug - that always helps! Good luck x
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