Ringworm - bit of info please

Christmas Crumpet

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Having hoped my horse just had bites on his neck I've come to the conclusion that its ringworm - more and more bits have come up under his neck so he's got about 9 patches in all. I'm going to the vet's at lunchtime to get some stuff for it but I want to know: -

1. How long does it last?
2. How long do you have to treat it for? i.e. once you've started treating it will more bits come up or does it stop it in its tracks?
3. Do you get any antibiotics or something similar to help get rid of it?
4. How often do you have to disinfect stables etc?
5. What's the best stuff to get rid of it?

He is in a yard on his own so no worry about him passing it on. However, he was moved about a month ago into a new field which has had cattle in over last winter and then 2 racehorses were in there just before him. Am I right to assume he's picked it up off a tree or something that they've rubbed against?

If there's anything else I've forgotten could you let me know!! Thanks.
 

1275gta

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Unfortunately it gets into the wood in stables and the only thing I know that kills it is creasote (the proper stuff) which is no longer available. The vet might be able to tell you of other stuff.

Be very careful if it is ringworm as you could pick it up quite easily.

We have had it in the pas in both cattle and horses and it does clear up quite quickly. We have always been given stuff that goes into their feed. Not sure of the name.
 

trendybraincell

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if untreated it takes about 6weeks to sort itself out. Lots of people will leave it because it doesn't normally bother the horse, however it is highly contagious and can spread to different species. So you could get it!

To treat it you want Imaverol and Virkon.
Dilute the Imaverol and bath affected areas 3 times fours days apart.
Using the Virkon disinfect EVERYTHING that has come into direct contact with your horse in the last 3 weeks, also disinfect your stable as the fungus can live in wood work for months after!

You can actually get everything you need off the internet (much cheaper)

Cattle are big carriers of ringworm, so its very likely the new field is where he picked it up.

pm if you need anymore info, just finished dealing with ringworm on my horse!

oh I forgot to add, have a bucket of virkon to wash your hands in after you've handled your horse
 

Orangehorse

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Virkron should also kill it. You can get this from tack shops and agricultural merchants.

Mine had it really badly when he was 4 - I thought it was fly bites too until the hair started dropping out. I did get some stuff from t he vet to put in the feed, and some special shampoo, but in the end I found that the lesions I hadn't noticed got better just as soon as those that I had been washing - although he was getting the medicine as well of course, which was in his system.
(Not to be used by women of child bearing age, and had to use gloves and mask, so pretty toxic).

Mine was quite dragged down by this, which the vet hadn't mentioned (but he didn't see the poor horse with raw patches all down one side from his ear to his rump). I gave him some Restore and a rest of a few weeks, but despite the terrible patches all the hair grew back quite OK with no tell-tale round patches and it hasn't affected his coat at all in the long term.
 

Christmas Crumpet

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Oh I also wanted to know is that am I right in thinking that once a horse has had it it is highly unlikely that they will be reinfected?

And - what if I don't manage to kill all the ringworm in the stable for example. Will he then keep getting more patches of ringworm and I will feel as though I'm fighting a losing battle?!!!

Thank you all so much for info. Hugely appreciated (and feeling quite relieved!).
 

Lordy100

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Imaverol is best, Grysofulvin (spelling???) is stuff they used to give you to add to feeds and is pretty powerful hence warning about women using it.

Ringworm is fungus so needs something to kill it off. IMHO Virkon is not powerful enough

Remember to do all your tack.
 

trendybraincell

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They do build up an immunity to the fungus, but only to the strain they have had (I could be wrong). Much like people and colds, there are different types of ringworm, so they would still be able to contract other strains of the fungus. I'm not 100% on that though.

If you treat the horse successfully and do not catch all the fungus in the stable your horse should be ok. The disinfecting is to stop the spread of the fungus to other horses/animals, more than to prevent reoccurring in your animal.
 

Laafet

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Norofulvin(sp) I think is what you are getting at, evil stuff that is not meant to be handled by women of a child bearing age so god only know what it does to the horses, we give to the neds at work and I don't think it is that effective. Virkon all the way for me and IT IS strong enough to kill it, afterall that's what they used to stop Foot and Mouth so it'll handle a bit of ringworm. You need to steam clean the wood in the stables too as ringworm will live in there for years.
 

Christmas Crumpet

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Just been to the vet's and got given...
Imaverol
Virkon sachets x 5
Rubber gloves
Tube with funny jelly in so I can take a sample of whatever it is and we can grow it at the vet's!!
Grysofulvin - apparently they've stopped making it though.

So am going to disinfect stable when I get home and apply Imaverol to horse, disinfect tack and headcollar/leadrope and see where we go from there!!
 
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