Joined
11 June 2018
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22
Hi all! I’m not a first time owner, in fact the following issue is with my third and youngest pony, but maybe someone more knowledgable can give me some advice.

I have two ponies currently. A mother/daughter who were rescues after being left wild for 8 years! Lovely temperaments, can’t fault them. The mother Kindle(late teens, NF pony) is ridden and a been-there-done-that type, however her daughter Kizzy (rising 5, cobxnf) hasn’t been educated much at all. She’s come on leaps and bound with me on the ground and I’m backing her successfully now...the only problem is her separation anxiety.

Kizzy refuses to step hoof outside the paddock without going a bit nuts. She throws her weight around and becomes quite uncontrollable. No one on my yard feels comfortable dealing with her in that fearful state as she can be unintentionally dangerous. On the flip side Kindle, her mother, can be taken out for long periods of time and Kizzy doesn’t care at all.

Kizzy is a sweetheart in every other way but this issue is preventing any further progress in her education.

Does anyone have any ideas on how I could coax Kizzy to be more relaxed and manageable outside of the paddock?

I have considered taking them both out and tying her up with her mother, my only concern is Kizzy working Kindle up as well. Can’t be dealing with them both going off!

(Horsy pic attached!) A85C486B-A8A0-44C1-AE77-3060A611DD61.jpeg
 
Joined
18 April 2015
Messages
82
Just a thought but do you have anyone to help you? Maybe you could take baby steps, with you handling the youngster and someone else taking care of the older horse. Small steps, then use food to keep her out for a short time alone. I have never had experience of horses being unwilling to go out of their paddock, but in terms of horses disliking things like trailers I have found that taking it step by step and offering food can work wonders. I think the key will be to start small and try to get her to associate being out of the paddock with treats.

I should caveat this by saying that although I have been around horses for many years I definitely do not consider myself an expert as for the most part I have had help and advice, so if someone more knowledgeable disagrees with this by all means do listen to them! Good luck! I will be interested to hear how you resolve the issue.
 

Pearlsasinger

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Joined
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22,630
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I would get someone to lead the mother while youlead the daughter and get her out and about with her mother to give her confidence. Take small steps and work towards the youngster being able to take the lead and then to leave mum several yards behind and, if you have a suitable route being able to leave and meet up with mum again while youare all out. Be prepared for it to take a long time to get to that stage though.
 
Joined
11 June 2018
Messages
22
Just a thought but do you have anyone to help you? Maybe you could take baby steps, with you handling the youngster and someone else taking care of the older horse. Small steps, then use food to keep her out for a short time alone. I have never had experience of horses being unwilling to go out of their paddock, but in terms of horses disliking things like trailers I have found that taking it step by step and offering food can work wonders. I think the key will be to start small and try to get her to associate being out of the paddock with treats.

I should caveat this by saying that although I have been around horses for many years I definitely do not consider myself an expert as for the most part I have had help and advice, so if someone more knowledgeable disagrees with this by all means do listen to them! Good luck! I will be interested to hear how you resolve the issue.
Thank you for the advice. I’m on a yard with lots of other horsey people but it’s a charity as well so we’re all very busy keeping the organisation running, training some of the residents takes a bad seat. Especially since my ponies are my responsibility but I have one lady who would help out, however she is extremely busy and our schedules rarely sync up. Typical! My Kizzy is a bit temprimental with anyone but me as well. I have a partner but they aren’t the most horsey person on earth and quite frankly I’d be concerned they’d just run off if one of the girls got a bit spooked.

Funny you mentioned that, she’s trailer shy too. Likely because she’s only been in one her whole life and that was when she was rescued. She’s very much a project so baby steps has always been our goal. I’ll let you know how I tackle this, stay tuned!
 
Joined
11 June 2018
Messages
22
I would get someone to lead the mother while youlead the daughter and get her out and about with her mother to give her confidence. Take small steps and work towards the youngster being able to take the lead and then to leave mum several yards behind and, if you have a suitable route being able to leave and meet up with mum again while youare all out. Be prepared for it to take a long time to get to that stage though.
Thanks for the reply! That was the original plan of action but lacking a reliable helper it’s almost impossible. I thought about simply tying mother up and then bringing daughter out to stand tied with her for a short time...I just hope she doesn’t start pinning people to walls again if she gets agitated! I’m very small so if daughter wants to go she knows how to use her weight against any obstacles, I’d end up a pancake. I try to circle her and calm her softly but it’s difficult. You’re right though, maybe repatition and baby steps will help us progress. She’s a sweet girl really, just uneducated. I’m sure we’ll get there in the end.
 

Shay

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Joined
17 August 2008
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6,191
I have a people squasher - or had. He doesn't do it now. If you can, make sure you have a hoof pick (Not the sharper metal ones - the plastic ones with the horse head on them work better) or a brush or something blunt but sufficiently pointy to hand so that as she squashes her own weight makes her uncomfortable enough to move off. (You can do it with your elbow - but if she really squashes you might get hurt) It must be passive - not a punitive act. The discomfort caused by her not you. Just a reason why squashing humans isn't nice for her.
 
Joined
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I have a people squasher - or had. He doesn't do it now. If you can, make sure you have a hoof pick (Not the sharper metal ones - the plastic ones with the horse head on them work better) or a brush or something blunt but sufficiently pointy to hand so that as she squashes her own weight makes her uncomfortable enough to move off. (You can do it with your elbow - but if she really squashes you might get hurt) It must be passive - not a punitive act. The discomfort caused by her not you. Just a reason why squashing humans isn't nice for her.
That’s a good idea, thank you! I’ll keep that in mind next time I’m in a closed space with her.
 
Joined
11 June 2018
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Could you advertise in your local tackshop/RC for someone to help you with them?
Yes I suppose I could. I could also get a trainer in if it comes to that but ideally I’d like to tackle it alone/within my yard. Like I mentioned before it’s a charity organisation as well as a yard so we have protocol etc for bringing people along.
 

Pearlsasinger

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W. Yorks
Yes I suppose I could. I could also get a trainer in if it comes to that but ideally I’d like to tackle it alone/within my yard. Like I mentioned before it’s a charity organisation as well as a yard so we have protocol etc for bringing people along.

In that case, I suggest that you find someone on your yard who knows what they are doing to help you before you or one of the horses gets hurt.
 

Red-1

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Joined
7 February 2013
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7,485
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Yorkshire
If you can take the older one out without fuss then I would do this, and work the younger one in the field initially. I would teach leading, yielding, backing, stopping etc.

Then move on to leaving the field and back in, so working on all the things you just worked on (backing, yielding etc) in order to do a perfect gateway entrance/exit. Make the exercise about the responses to the requests rather then being about leaving the field.

If there is no other horse in the field she may not be quite so stuck to the field anyway.

Apart from that you will need assistance. Would the protocols allow a qualified and insured person to come and help? If not, I would be surprised and wonder why? I can see that ATM with flu there may need to be assurances with disinfection, but this sounds like a general rule?

I think you need help as you can't simply

...I just hope she doesn’t start pinning people to walls again if she gets agitated! I’m very small so if daughter wants to go she knows how to use her weight against any obstacles, I’d end up a pancake..
You have to feel confident from the start that you have a plan or you are already on a hiding to nothing.
 
Joined
11 June 2018
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If you can take the older one out without fuss then I would do this, and work the younger one in the field initially. I would teach leading, yielding, backing, stopping etc.

Then move on to leaving the field and back in, so working on all the things you just worked on (backing, yielding etc) in order to do a perfect gateway entrance/exit. Make the exercise about the responses to the requests rather then being about leaving the field.

If there is no other horse in the field she may not be quite so stuck to the field anyway.

Apart from that you will need assistance. Would the protocols allow a qualified and insured person to come and help? If not, I would be surprised and wonder why? I can see that ATM with flu there may need to be assurances with disinfection, but this sounds like a general rule?

I think you need help as you can't simply



You have to feel confident from the start that you have a plan or you are already on a hiding to nothing.
Thank you for the advice, it’s much appreciated. There are about 30 horses in the field(s) I believe but she’s only attached to her mother, they keep to themselves. I’ve already started working her in the field and she’s come along leaps and bounds since, hence why I’m now working her up to exiting and reentering the field as you suggested. Yes as long as they are qualified and insured then that would be just fine. I’ll definitely look into local trainers who could help me tackle the issue and give me more tips on how to keep her relaxed as possible during those times.

She has a lovely nature and I’m certain she’ll make a lovely riddle pony given time and attentive training so perhaps you’re all right and I should seek some professional assistance now. Thanks again for all the advice, it’s reassuring.
 
Joined
3 October 2018
Messages
235
The fact you can leave her in the paddock and take her Mum away is a really good sign and in my experience means the separation can be overcome with time. It's baby steps basically, I'd start by feeding one step out of the field and slowly building it up. Its always harder to do these things on your own, I'm in the same position re husband being none horsey. I'd also make sure another horse was about when she goes in so she doesn't associate being in with being alone. Have you got stables? I'm a big believer in making everything nice and positive.
 
Joined
11 June 2018
Messages
22
The fact you can leave her in the paddock and take her Mum away is a really good sign and in my experience means the separation can be overcome with time. It's baby steps basically, I'd start by feeding one step out of the field and slowly building it up. Its always harder to do these things on your own, I'm in the same position re husband being none horsey. I'd also make sure another horse was about when she goes in so she doesn't associate being in with being alone. Have you got stables? I'm a big believer in making everything nice and positive.
It’s at times like this you wish for more hands! I definitely think we’ll overcome it, she’s bright girl, just lacking in life experience. They both live out 24/7 so they are always together except when I take the mother out for rides etc. Kizzy is fine the whole time she’s left alone. It’s only when she is the horse to leave the paddock that they both become upset. I do coax with a few treats but she isn’t insterested, too concerned with the break in routine. She tacks up without complaint, she even walks herself out of the gate but as soon as she realises her mum isn’t coming she panics. I will try an schedule my yard manager to help me out a few times and see if we can get them both out successfully without mayhem. Thank you for the advice, it’s appreciated!
 
Joined
6 August 2012
Messages
308
Location
East Lothian
Hi all! I’m not a first time owner, in fact the following issue is with my third and youngest pony, but maybe someone more knowledgable can give me some advice.

I have two ponies currently. A mother/daughter who were rescues after being left wild for 8 years! Lovely temperaments, can’t fault them. The mother Kindle(late teens, NF pony) is ridden and a been-there-done-that type, however her daughter Kizzy (rising 5, cobxnf) hasn’t been educated much at all. She’s come on leaps and bound with me on the ground and I’m backing her successfully now...the only problem is her separation anxiety.

Kizzy refuses to step hoof outside the paddock without going a bit nuts. She throws her weight around and becomes quite uncontrollable. No one on my yard feels comfortable dealing with her in that fearful state as she can be unintentionally dangerous. On the flip side Kindle, her mother, can be taken out for long periods of time and Kizzy doesn’t care at all.

Kizzy is a sweetheart in every other way but this issue is preventing any further progress in her education.

Does anyone have any ideas on how I could coax Kizzy to be more relaxed and manageable outside of the paddock?

I have considered taking them both out and tying her up with her mother, my only concern is Kizzy working Kindle up as well. Can’t be dealing with them both going off!

(Horsy pic attached!) View attachment 29928
Strange how Kizzy is fine without her Mum ,an event has happened in the past to make her fearful of something happening to her in the yard away from her field. Possibly feeding her in the yard and pleasant experiences for her there may help .With her unknown background she may have been ill treated.I had a rescue that was fearful of being separated from her buddy, a nightmare to catch and spooked at anything.Lots of time and patience was needed to overcome this but improved during the course of a year.
 
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