Should I get a youngster?

Nickyhorse89

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After having 0 luck being missold horse after horse safe to say I am fed up. Most recently I bought a horse that had undisclosed medical issues so yet again given up on my dreams.

I've had a long break and feel like dipping my toes in the horse world again. I'm thinking of possibly getting an unbacked youngster, maybe 2/3 yr old so at least I know pretty much all the history. I'm not fussed with having to wait to ride and more than happy to put the work in myself. Just wondering what other people's experience getting their first youngster has been. Give me the good, bad and ugly.

Tia xxx
 

ycbm

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I've loved making all the youngsters I have started. I've bought one yearling, a couple of two year olds, three year olds, four year olds, two 5, one 7 and one 8 year old unbroken and made them myself. None have had any issues, none gave me any serious challenges and they were blank slates nobody else had spoiled. And they were a lot cheaper than made horses. I'd go for it if I was you.
 
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southerncomfort

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I absolutely love training youngsters. My current one will definitely be my last but I've had so much fun with him.

What I would say is that my 2 previous youngsters, although similarly easy to back, turned out not to be quite right for what I wanted long term, so their is still a risk attached in that sense.

Also, no matter how experience you are, always have a good instructor on hand who has lots of experience of educating youngsters.
 

Cortez

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How come you’ve been “missold” so many horses? Are you very inexperienced? If you don’t have the experience to evaluate a horse then I would think you won’t have the knowledge to train one. Even if you manage to handle, break and train it, Young horses take years to become steady, reliable mounts. I would recommend contacting a reliable agent or dealer to help you find a suitable horse, or perhaps take further training in riding until you are more secure.
 
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Agree with IHW as this is what happened to me. And even after the pro help, there’s no guarantee that the horse will end up being right for you. There were other circumstances which were not ideal with mine which were big contributing factors though, so I might do it again but only if I can afford to send it to someone with a proven track record from the get go.
 
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Slopping along on a loose rein somewhere in Devon
I took on my first youngster four, nay five years ago at the age of 57. She was a youngster (4yo) that my Equine Mentor/Trainer had backed and then had gone back to the owner. I'd gone to see her not really thinking to bring her home, but somehow she won my heart and she did!

I kept her at my Trainer's yard for the first few months and had the benefit of constant support and supervision in the early stages before I took her home, which was invaluable. I also called on her support when needed for the future for example on our first fun-ride where she rode with me and looked after us!!

Professional advice right from the start is IME absolutely vital and I couldn't ever have produced my little coblet without it - even if you ARE very very confident at dealing with ANY situation it still helps to have another set of eyes look at the problem as they may see something obvious but which you've missed.
 

teddy_eq

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I love producing young horses, there is little more rewarding.

Even with sufficient 'experience' to manage a young horse, make sure you have the financial resource for professional help if you need it.
 

RachelFerd

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Undisclosed medical issues also exist in 2/3 year olds - it is just that no-one has found them yet!

I'm always hesitant of anyone thinking that knowing full history and starting from scratch guarantees a smooth ride. You have no concrete idea what the horse is going to be like as they mature - both in physical appearance, physical capability and temperament. You can make good guesses, but there's nothing certain.

The path of less risk is always to buy something proven to be doing the job you want it for. The reason for getting a youngster is either because you can't afford the cost of the former, or you *want* to go through the process of bringing on a young horse - accepting that includes warts and all.
 

Gloi

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I would never buy anything else 🙂
My first youngster after my first pony (who was actually also a half trained 3yo) was a yearling Fell and all my ponies since have been youngsters, sometimes handled, sometimes not.
I have a mistrust of animals someone else has trained .
 

Nickyhorse89

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26 July 2015
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How come you’ve been “missold” so many horses? Are you very inexperienced? If you don’t have the experience to evaluate a horse then I would think you won’t have the knowledge to train one. Even if you manage to handle, break and train it, Young horses take years to become steady, reliable mounts. I would recommend contacting a reliable agent or dealer to help you find a suitable horse, or perhaps take further training in riding until you are more secure.
I wouldn't say I'm inexperienced, I was lied to. Bought from a reputable person through a sales livery, had the horse vetted but the owner wasn't honest with either of us and hid past surgery history.

That is true, I could get a youngster and it's not what I wanted but at least I have the history as that's been my problem previously.
 

Nickyhorse89

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Thanks for all the feedback guys. I wouldn't dream of doing this alone, would definitely get professional help. I also understand that I could get a youngster and there could be health problems so I'm back at square 1. I'm just weighing up my options
 

Cortez

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Thanks for all the feedback guys. I wouldn't dream of doing this alone, would definitely get professional help. I also understand that I could get a youngster and there could be health problems so I'm back at square 1. I'm just weighing up my options
Welcome to HorseWorld, where nothing is ever certain......
 

honetpot

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I buy two year olds just coming out of winter, looking mank and hopefully cheap. I used to pay not more than £1000. They used to spend the 2/3 year doing the odd show, and just generally teaching them basic manners, but they spend most of their time eating. At three, it depends, if they are ready to be sat on and walked down the lane, no real work or they get left till four, just eating coming to be wormed and the farrier. At four they are backed properly and sold.
I buy for temperament, some sort of breed papers are a bonus, I like a stallion that has least been ridden, and competed a bit. As long as it frame is OK, and it's fairly square, it will fill out. By the time it's four you know what temperament it has, and I find a nice clean slate well mannered, just backed four year old is easy to sell. As long as you do not over handle them, and can find someone competent to back them, it's just about idiot proof, and you will not lose money. The only big horse we kept for my daughter, was a star, he just had a matching pair of humungous splints on his front legs, but was never sick or lame.
For us, it was the only way move up in sizes, I just couldn't afford a made horse, and if its bonkers, or just too much for you, you find out before you have spent a lot of money.
 

pistolpete

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29 July 2009
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I feel too inexperienced to take one on or it would be in my mind to while the prices are crazy and demand so high. I love the idea but young horses need clear consistent handling and lots of it. Best of luck.
 
Joined
19 January 2022
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After having 0 luck being missold horse after horse safe to say I am fed up. Most recently I bought a horse that had undisclosed medical issues so yet again given up on my dreams.

I've had a long break and feel like dipping my toes in the horse world again. I'm thinking of possibly getting an unbacked youngster, maybe 2/3 yr old so at least I know pretty much all the history. I'm not fussed with having to wait to ride and more than happy to put the work in myself. Just wondering what other people's experience getting their first youngster has been. Give me the good, bad and ugly.

Tia xxx
If you know what you’re doing, you have the time and the experience then go for it. However, I know myself from schooling youngsters, a badly broken horse is very easily done and the work it takes to get their confidence, trust, ability, and overall rideability to a good place can be more difficult than breaking them well in the first place. Absolutely make sure that if you are uncertain of anything that you seek help from someone who knows what they’re doing. It is the most rewarding experience to break your own, ride them, and either keep them or sell them and see how well they are doing with you or their new owners! I’m so sorry to hear that you have been misled by some sellers. But once again, just urging you to be very careful! The very best of luck with it ☘️😊
 
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