Show me your fit irish draughts!

Fly_By_Wire

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Hello,

If anyone has time I'd love to see photos of draught types in fit/well muscled and slim condition! P has been on a weight loss regime for quite a few months now, and honestly I'm going a bit weight blind looking at her every day. I'm body condition scoring her twice a month and she's coming out as top end of ideal weight, but she still looks a bit big to me! Could anyone show me what they consider the ideal for a chunkier type?
 

Rowreach

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This is full ID, although probably not true to type. But a correct weight, lacking a little muscle. View attachment 59925
Ooh, what's the breeding? I had (bred) a gorgeous full ID mare who was rather similar, not typey but flew through the breed inspections. I had more trouble keeping weight on her than off, I don't think she was ever fat in her life.
 

ycbm

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I don't think you can judge weight for a weight reduction program very easily from pictures. My mare looks little different in a photo than she did two months ago, but she's a lot thinner.

I judge the weight I want them to be from the feel of the ribs. The ones behind the saddle I like to be able to just about see or at the very least feel without any pressure. The main body of ribs i want to feel easily, not have to go poking around for them.
 

ycbm

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What does everyone feed their IDs? Mine literally gets fat on fresh air.
I don't have an ID but I am feeding a PRE mare who lives on air and I would feed an ID the same.

She is a solid 15.3+ and she gets 5kg of ryegrass haylage, soaked, and as much barley straw as she wants to eat, which is around 1/3 of a bale. She has 6-9 hours a day on plentiful rough grass, muzzled. That is causing slow weight loss. She is in light work.

I'm trying right now to move her to timothy haylage in the hope that I can stop soaking. Either way, I think she will probably end up on 7-8kg of haylage and as much straw as she wants to eat, once she is at a weight where I can easily feel all her ribs.
 

Celtic Fringe

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What does everyone feed their IDs? Mine literally gets fat on fresh air.
Mine lives out on what looks like a bare paddock (his poos tell us that he is finding grass though!). He has half a scoop of Ease and Excel or competition mix depending on energy levels. He has a small amount of haylage in the morning and the yard has just started giving him a little in the afternoon too.
He puts on weight literally overnight but can drop quickly too so keeping him at an even level is quite tricky - easier in the winter though! Obviously I keep him topped up with a handful of fibre nuggets and a carrot as essential treats :)
 

Fly_By_Wire

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These are beautiful! I'm definitely having to get my eye in for a chunkier type, here's the horse in question this week. I'd still like her a bit slimmer, but I don't think she qualifies as obese any more!

I feel the pain of those with horses living on air, Pip is on hay/haylage with a cup of balancer once daily, working hard 6x a week and I'm still struggling! 20201128_190127.jpg
 

Fly_By_Wire

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View attachment 59937 This is my part-bred Irish Draught out with his rider in September. He had been fully clipped the day before. I feel obliged to add that his fitness and training are entirely due to his fabulous rider - my role is to proffer acceptable treats and occasionally clamber aboard for a short amble :D
He is stunning! What's he crossed with?
 

Kamikaze

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View attachment 59937 This is my part-bred Irish Draught out with his rider in September. He had been fully clipped the day before. I feel obliged to add that his fitness and training are entirely due to his fabulous rider - my role is to proffer acceptable treats and occasionally clamber aboard for a short amble :D
Oh my goodness I love your horse. Chestnuts are the best.
 

Celtic Fringe

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He is stunning! What's he crossed with?
Thank-you :) He is a nine year old ID x cob. His dam is 50% ID (Winmaur Sergeant Pepper) out of a cob mare. He is by a cream and white stallion of unknown breeding but a very nice temperament! My friend bred him with the hope of a coloured maxi-filly to show but ended up with a small (14.3h), light boned chestnut colt so that is why he ended up with me :D His rider has done an amazing job and they will go out at PSG once lockdown ends.
 

mariew

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I also think people not used to heavier breeds are always going to think they are overweight regardless. When i had mine on full livery and was unable to see her often she ended up quite ribby but no-one on the yard thought there was anything wrong as they were used to TBs and WBs. I moved her shortly after.

I think your horse in the picture looks lovely!
 
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