Societal constructs

Pearlsasinger

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Aspiration and expectation is everything. Not only do working class kids miss out on the educated role models that are just not there in their every day life, but they also have endless nitwit lefties telling them that certain professions / universities / cultural events are 'elitist' and that they shouldn't aim to do or see those things which the middle classes do. It's wicked, and does more harm to poor kids than lack of money ever would.

Where are these endless nitwit lefties?


I spent the *vast* majority of my working life teaching in areas of socio-economic deprivation, No-one that I am aware of ever told any of my pupils that they couldn't achieve, or take up any career that they wished. And indeed, many of them did eventually go to University. I am the former teacher of doctors, nurses, teachers, chefs, to name just a few and also,unfortunately of more than one convicted drug-dealer.
 
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blitznbobs

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I think one of the major roadblocks is debt. Kids need to know that there is good debt and bad debt. They also need better careers advice about what jobs pay better and what degrees/ education path leads to those jobs. If you rack up 50k worth of debt to become a city lawyer then you can pay that back quickly within a couple of years. If you do lots of hospitality courses and need to work for years on the front desk at a hotel 50ks worth of debt is going to take a long time to pay off. I think debt is something that people who have never had money are afraid of but getting in to debt for education was one of the best decisions i ever made…however its hard to convince parents that struggle from one paycheque to the next that a certain qualification will lead to such higher earning potential its worth taking on. Higher earning parents generally can see this and may have funds to bale out if necessary so dont caution against it so greatly or even encourage to take the debt on… the earnings divide is so complicated that its so much more than opportunities and role models … which is why its almost impossible to level the playing field.
 

Keith_Beef

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Seine et Oise, France
Supper? In Sheffield? Surely that's the cup of cocoa and a biscuit that you have just before you go to bed! Do you mean tea?
I posted earlier in this thread that when I ate at five O'clock, it was tea. And yes, I would then have a biscuit or two and a glass of milk or a yoghurt before going to bed.

Nowadays I tend to sit down to eat at sometime between 20h and 21h and the meal can go on until 22h or later, and then because I've been up since perhaps 06h30 I'm usually tired and ready go to bed.
 

scats

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11 September 2007
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Really! I do not agree. I wish I could go to the North East, or at least back to Manchester, I find the epic rudeness unbearable sometimes.
How odd. I’ve lived here all my life (Wirral bred, but my mum is a scouser) and I’d honestly say that people from Liverpool are genuinely a friendly bunch (there are exceptions, obviously!)
 

paddy555

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23 December 2010
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I think one of the major roadblocks is debt. Kids need to know that there is good debt and bad debt. They also need better careers advice about what jobs pay better and what degrees/ education path leads to those jobs. If you rack up 50k worth of debt to become a city lawyer then you can pay that back quickly within a couple of years. If you do lots of hospitality courses and need to work for years on the front desk at a hotel 50ks worth of debt is going to take a long time to pay off. I think debt is something that people who have never had money are afraid of but getting in to debt for education was one of the best decisions i ever made…however its hard to convince parents that struggle from one paycheque to the next that a certain qualification will lead to such higher earning potential its worth taking on. Higher earning parents generally can see this and may have funds to bale out if necessary so dont caution against it so greatly or even encourage to take the debt on… the earnings divide is so complicated that its so much more than opportunities and role models … which is why its almost impossible to level the playing field.
also the question of if it is worth going to uni in the first place, Is it going to be cost effective? Is the course you are paying for at the uni you are applying for going to bring in the £s later on or would it be better to apply for a course that will be more lucrative longterm at a better uni or to look at some other way forward.
 

Kaylum

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29 May 2010
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Class who even cares? You will always see people saying I came from a poor family and now look at me? Well done but who even cares? Work hard and get on with life. Boasting, materialisum I am not interested in. Helping other people and animals is my life. I don't look at people and their class, I look at people in a non judgemental way. If they are kind then they are a person I want to be around. You definitely do not need a degree to get a good job. You need to work hard and get out of bed and go to work each day. We don't even look at qualifications when sifting jobs. We look at experience. And these are professional management Technology jobs.
 

rabatsa

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18 September 2007
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Yorkshire
I have a cousin, dad was an electrician for the YEB, mum a cleaner. She is very, very clever. She went through school in older year groups to her actual age. She also gained 8, yes eight, A* A levels. The headmistress called her into the office to ask which university she was applying to Oxford or Cambridge. Her reply was neither as she had got herself a job at the local travel agents.

This may seem a waste to some people but for her it was ideal. She was able to travel the world paid for by her company. When the chain was for sale she led a management buyout and later when she sold her share she invested in a corner shop. She built the shop up and sold that and is now happily retired at a young age.

She has done all this without incurring any debt to herself or her parents.
 

Pearlsasinger

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I posted earlier in this thread that when I ate at five O'clock, it was tea. And yes, I would then have a biscuit or two and a glass of milk or a yoghurt before going to bed.

Nowadays I tend to sit down to eat at sometime between 20h and 21h and the meal can go on until 22h or later, and then because I've been up since perhaps 06h30 I'm usually tired and ready go to bed.

Sorry, I must have missed that post. Of course, while in France you do as the French do and speaking French, use the usual French words. I read the post that I quoted as meaning that you had behaved similarly whilst back in UK

"What does it say about me that I refer to the the meals if the day in English as "breakfast, dinner, supper" "
 
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Keith_Beef

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and speaking French, use the usual French words
Standard French calls the three meals "petit déjeuner, déjeuner, dîner" which is a recent habit that has spread from Paris. It started in Parliament, when debates would run very late into the night and the politicians would sleep late the next day, taking their first meal "déjeuner" closer to midday, but as a lighter version.

In more rural regions, where people get up and therefore eat, early and especially in Quebec, the older names of "déjeuner, dîner, souper" are still common. And I like to revive old words, or use regionalisms, to see how people react.
 

Pearlsasinger

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W. Yorks
Standard French calls the three meals "petit déjeuner, déjeuner, dîner" which is a recent habit that has spread from Paris. It started in Parliament, when debates would run very late into the night and the politicians would sleep late the next day, taking their first meal "déjeuner" closer to midday, but as a lighter version.

In more rural regions, where people get up and therefore eat, early and especially in Quebec, the older names of "déjeuner, dîner, souper" are still common. And I like to revive old words, or use regionalisms, to see how people react.

Well to answer your question, what it says about you, if you refer in English to meals as breakfast, lunch ,supper, is that your are trying to hide your roots
 
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