Strangles need advice.

racebuddy

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New horse moving on to our yard that has been on a yard which is 10min down the road from us , has had confirmed strangles and yard was shut , now all clear and all normal goings on have reaumed , ie horses moving on and off also new horse was at other end of yard , vet said the new horse to be in isolation for
2weeks on our yarc , just worried really for
My own horses especially as all go
Out and compete , also a second question is nest type of calmer show horse competed at county show very well behaved just a little
On edge any recommendations on best calmer , thanks choc and wine available
 

PorkChop

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Can't help with the strangles info, sorry, but I can understand why you are worried.

I have used Equifeast for calmer supplements before, they are super helpful and each supplement can be tried and tweeked until they find a formula that works.
 

Shay

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If the vet has cleared the affected yard for movement there should be no problem. But if not then ideally the horse should be kept isolated for a minimum of 14 days. It is up to your YO - but there are precautions you can take.

Strangles is a wet transmission - so no shared water sources. Absolutely no contact between your horses and the incoming horse. Obviously you can't alienate your fellow liveries - but as best you can ensure that no-one goes from the new horse to yours for at least 14 days. No shared brushes, no wet noses or wet hands giving treats. If you are DIY its easier.

If all else fails there is a vaccine against Strangles. It won't actually stop the horse getting it - but it will make it easier and reduce the risk of complications. Strangles itself isn't actually too bad - its the complications that are horrible.

Most yard owners are responsible about strangles and will declare the infection to local yards, close the yard and stop movement. As long as that has happened you don't really have much to fear.
 

mynutmeg

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If the vet has cleared the affected yard for movement there should be no problem. But if not then ideally the horse should be kept isolated for a minimum of 14 days. It is up to your YO - but there are precautions you can take.

Strangles is a wet transmission - so no shared water sources. Absolutely no contact between your horses and the incoming horse. Obviously you can't alienate your fellow liveries - but as best you can ensure that no-one goes from the new horse to yours for at least 14 days. No shared brushes, no wet noses or wet hands giving treats. If you are DIY its easier.

If all else fails there is a vaccine against Strangles. It won't actually stop the horse getting it - but it will make it easier and reduce the risk of complications. Strangles itself isn't actually too bad - its the complications that are horrible.

Most yard owners are responsible about strangles and will declare the infection to local yards, close the yard and stop movement. As long as that has happened you don't really have much to fear.

Actually while there is a vaccine if a vaccinated horse catches strangles they are more likely to have complicaitons hence why it's not used more.
 

Red-1

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To put your mind at rest, if the yard has been super careful, and the vet has cleared it, all the horses should have been swabbed clear of the bacteria, and this horse has not been swabbed positive at all.

Strangles is a terrible disease, and this may help you all to refresh your isolation procedure. It is worth remembering this when you are at a show as well, not allowing your horse to rest on a wooden fence, greet pals, have other people pet them.

It is never possible to prevent possible contamination entirely, even if you keep your horse at home alone, as I do. I am super careful, but still my horse sees a farrier, has his vaccinations due so will see the vet next month, we have deliveries from the feed merchant who delivers yard to yard, I compete so we are in a collecting ring......... with other horses who are all clearing their noses.......

All you can do is your very best and what seems appropriate.

If you are worried you could put a sign up outside your door not to pet your horse, and you could even use cones and tape to restrict access to other people. You could ensure that your feed, bedding and tools are kept separate, and use a separate muck heap. You could have a Virkon solution outside the door to wash yourself off before entering. You could avoid the arena..... You could also take your horse's temperature every morning to ensure you are not working him when he is not yet showing symptoms but is ill. I guess if you were so worried you could rent a field and keep him in a bubble.

That is the beauty of keeping your own horse, you have options. If it were me and I were worried I would call the local vets and discuss how sure they are that this horse is no risk. You will probably find that they can reassure you, and aside from normal isolation procedures such as not field sharing for 2 weeks you can carry on as normal.
 

Goldenstar

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As long as everything has been done correctly it is no more likely that your horse will catch strangles from this horse than the one you stand next to at a show .
To put your mind at rest I would check with your YOer the swabs have been done .
Proper quarantine should be done of course.
 
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