Strong Dog

LaurenBay

Well-Known Member
Joined
15 November 2010
Messages
4,716
Location
Essex
So Ralph is just superb in every way and is very much part of the family now (owned since Dec) he is super well behaved on walks, BUT in a new place and new surroundings he is so so strong, I can hold him, but it isn't enjoyable at all. He is not at all strong in familiar places and plods along without pulling me once and once in a safe place he goes off the lead nicely (recall is now back on track!) He is lead in a harness with a single lead that attaches to the top. I have purchased a halti, I tried it on for size and within seconds he took it off. I would like to try it again as this is the thing that has been recommended most. he did not seem to like it, but perhaps I just need to re introduce it another way?

We have tried the below:

When he pulls, I stop and stand still, once he stands nicely I walk on again. This didn't have much effect and he pulled the second we moved forwards again.

When he pulls, turn and walk the opposite way until he is not pulling, then turn around and continue walk. This had better success but hasn't solved the issue and I spent a lot of time walking the wrong way.

Keeping him at my heel and dropping small bits of food so he learns at my side is the best place to be - ZERO effect!

Like I said above, this is only in new places that he does this so doesn't effect me every walk (we go for 3 long walks a day) We went to a familiar place on Sat and he was as good as gold, Yesterday we went somewhere new and he just tried to drag me everywhere, he did go off lead for a while and was great, stayed near and came to call. Once the lead went back on he was back to pulling me.
 

Clodagh

Well-Known Member
Joined
17 August 2005
Messages
14,210
Location
Essex
Figure of eight made with a slip lead, look on you tube. Brilliant and made it possible to walk the spaniel without her dragging me along. They aren't keen, but she learned that if she didn't pull I took it off, pull and it went back on.
 

PapaverFollis

Well-Known Member
Joined
13 November 2012
Messages
2,165
My spaniel calls his Halti his "biscuit hat"... Lol. It's not perfect but it takes him down to managable when he's being a dingbat. I'm 95% sure, with him, the pulling is due to a level of uncertainty/nervousness about being in a new place. So we put the biscuit hat on and he gets lots of reward and positive associations and starts to feel a little more confident. I do tend to just manage around not having to do too much lead walking these days though to be really honest. I'm not good enough at dog training to have cracked that nut.
 

Sandstone1

Well-Known Member
Joined
16 July 2010
Messages
3,972
There are different headcollars. Ie gencon, gentle leader and cani collar etc. You need to train the dog to get used to any of them and should really use them with a double ended lead with one end attached to a collar.
 

LaurenBay

Well-Known Member
Joined
15 November 2010
Messages
4,716
Location
Essex
ok I will give the halti another go.

I was thinking to pop it on and then when he isn't trying to get it off, give him praise and some low fat treats?
 

Sandstone1

Well-Known Member
Joined
16 July 2010
Messages
3,972
I would use treats to encourage him to put his nose in to it then slowly progress to putting it completely on.
Once hes happy with that use treats to encourage him to walk with it on.
Try looking at clicker training or positive reinforcement on the internet.
 
Joined
6 November 2008
Messages
227
Location
Lancashire
I find a combination of headcollar and chest harness on a double ended lead works quite well, it gives you fine control but with extra brakes if you need them without pulling on their neck.

Lots of treats or a game when the headcollar goes on until they get used to it, or you can use a figure 8 of soft elastic fastened just tight enough to feel but enough not restrict can get them used to the sensation in the house/garden without adding a lead or the excitement of a walk. I think you can buy something to do the job, but plain elastic is just as good.

Just in case it's the halti he doesn't like - maybe try a different headcollar. I like the gentle leader, it seems to work slightly differently to the halti and I find my dogs seem to accept it better and quicker.
 

Pearlsasinger

Well-Known Member
Joined
20 February 2009
Messages
23,740
Location
W. Yorks
The Rotters walk on a fig 8 lead, with a separate lead to a harness. They do wear collars but if they want to back out of them, their neck shape makes it very easy. Some harnesses encourage them to pull but, with the right harness, the fig 8 is wonderful, they soon learn that if they don't pull, the nose action stops, you don't need to take it off.
 

paddy555

Well-Known Member
Joined
23 December 2010
Messages
3,256
my young dog was similar to your description OP. I solved the problem by a Julius K9 harness and a dogmatic which is a headcollar. It took him a time to get used to the dogmatic but it is very effective.

However the thing that worked for me with a big and very strong dog who really wouldn't listen was to use a separate lead on each. The lead on the harness was fastened back to my waist belt. That way if the dog pulled I would have a lot more control than just having the lead in my hand. Recently I have also put the dogmatic lead on the waist belt. If he walks nicely then there is no pressure on him at all and we do sits and turns etc and he gets rewarded. If he pulls then it is up to him. I found this to be the most effective combination and it really works well. The lead on the harness is completely loose at all times unless he choses to run off and it is just the back up in case of problems. The dogmatic lead is also loose and he can choose to keep it that way which he has learnt to do.
I did and still do turns if there is any pressure from him but I give him the command and turn right round, I don't turn and walk the other way. For mine that seems to work the best.
 

Sprout

Well-Known Member
Joined
30 March 2007
Messages
12,900
Location
New Forest
I have 2 Swissies who are incredibly strong when they get excited! I have found Halties can slide up towards the eyes, so I use Dogmatic headcollars which have been brilliant. I introduce them slowly, putting them on, giving a treat, wait a moment then remove .... repeat. Then I progress to putting it on just before feed time and removing afterwards. Then, using a double ended lead, one end on headcollar and other on collar, I walk around the garden, applying no pressure to the headcollar. It might sound like a faff, but progress can be made really quickly with acceptance and no resistance. Good Luck.
 

Moobli

Well-Known Member
Joined
13 June 2013
Messages
2,492
Location
Scotland
I am not keen on headcollars - although know they can be effective if introduced properly. Almost every dog I have ever seen wearing them just seem to hate them.

I train loose lead walking in a non distracting environment first, so you could perhaps practise it in his usual haunts where he walks well and at home in the garden before heading to somewhere new and more stimulating.


There are also various non-pull harnesses online but maybe someone with experience could recommend one.
 

rabatsa

Well-Known Member
Joined
18 September 2007
Messages
1,755
Location
Yorkshire
My niece uses a headcollar on her spaniel. She reckons it is great for calming her down like an autistic child in a firm hug. When the dog starts to get hyper the headcollar goes on with instant effect even when not out on a walk.
 

Cinnamontoast

Fais pas chier!
Joined
6 July 2010
Messages
22,541
Halts seem to ride up into their eyes. The figure of 8 using a sliplead is much kinder and means I can walk my trains using literally one finger each.

Whatever you use, introduce slowly.
 

deb_l222

Well-Known Member
Joined
19 January 2012
Messages
683
Location
Barnsley
I'm not struck on Halti's, they do ride up. I've a Gencon and the wally dog will still pull like a train into that but she's more manageable. Best thing is a slip lead turned figure eight but she's lightening quick at getting that off her face so we end up back to square one.

Pullers are a nuisance and make walking hard work. Willow bounces in front of my feet as well so most of the time I want to throttle her!! Keeping calm is the key with her. The more wound up she gets (usually by seeing another dog), the more wound up I get but I have to breathe deep and keep calm and just STOP. We walk on when she's calmer. The other two think I'm daft :)

She is getting there but she's flipping hard work, you have my sympathy.
 
Top