Suggestions and advice please

MissMoo

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3 January 2008
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This is my first foray into the hunting forum so please bear with me. I'm hoping some of you may be able to give me some help/tips on how to deal with my horses in the following situation:

We have been very fortunate to buy a field next to our house which my partner would like me to bring my horses home to, however I am really concerned about this as the hunt rides directly past the field and are in very close proximity to us two/three times a year. I have an elderly horse who is a bit neurotic and one with suspensory problems who loves to run around (and if sound would love to join the hunt!). How would I keep them calm and sensible on the days the hunt ride round? If I leave them out they are both likely to gallop around blindly, and if I put them in the stables they are going to worry when the hunt ride down the road past them as the stables are only 30/40' from the road so the noise is going to be worrying for them. I did consider sedation from the vet but not sure how effective that will be if I don't know the time the hunt will be in the area....

A friend nearly lost her horse to a fencing injury a few years back when the hunt went past her field unannounced so I am keen to avoid any problems.

I would really appreciate any advice you can give me, thank you.
 

MissMoo

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3 January 2008
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887
Are you able to contact hunt sec to ask for days and approx times?

I would stable and use calmer syringes or sedation if that doesn’t work. Not worth an accident
Thank you. Yes, the hunt emailed me last year telling me the dates they were coming past, usually giving a day or two's notice.
 

tatty_v

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I think if you can find out when they will be in your area in advance, then there are various preventative steps you can take. Over the years we’ve tried:

1. Stabling plus calmer/sedation (ok so long as you have time for the sedation to work and they are not already wound up). A calm companion can help too.

2. Supervised bucket feed in the field (this works for us if the hunt are just passing briefly down the bridleway that adjoins our land).

3. Going out for the morning/afternoon eg boxing up for a hack, arena hire etc. (The most foolproof method but not so handy if it’s a working day).

The one option we haven’t tried yet is just going along to the meet, doing the first half hour and then looping back home - mainly because I am not brave enough!
 

Lou27

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3 December 2020
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I would think carefully about the risk of having your horses at home in this situation as in my experience, the hunt couldn’t give a toss about any stress or damage caused. Just last year they were chasing a fox (the law doesn’t apply to them) who had sought refuge in a field at the livery yard. Horses in fields going absolutely crazy inc. one that ended up with a very nasty fence injury. Despite frantic horses, they still pursued.

Potentially, finding out when they are likely to be around may help but you’re likely going to have to stable & sedate.

I contacted my MP about the matter and he just said to call 101 who equally couldn’t care less and thats when you manage to get through. I find it ludicrous and bizarre that everyone has to accommodate for them.
 

SOS

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As it sounds like you already have, keep in contact with the hunt so they can let you know what days they will be passing.

A previous yard I was at they often hunted very close by and lots of the horses were hunters which increased the neuroticism in some of them. Those not going hunting would be worked hard in the morning and then have lunch and left in the stables with plenty of hay. We turned classic FM up even more than usual and it covered the base/horn sounds up well. If the hunt got within sight then we would close up top doors as we didn’t trust them not to jump out (they still had windows with bars to look through/for circulation). They were always fine.
 

ester

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we stable and sedalin and usually the radio on (they don't get very close but one reacts terribly for some reason! Never been but know they did used to meet at a previous yard), vet happy for us to have a small stock for that. - She would basically pace and stop eating for the next 24 hours if left to her own devices. Companion has hunted quite a lot and couldn't give a toss.
 

M1lbie

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31 July 2019
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I have three horses who live out 24/7/365, I only have 2 stables, the hunt kennels are in our village so we have hound exercise first with bikes and at this time of year with horses, my three get used to them going past and may show interest to start with soon settle back down. When hunting starts they always let me know via text message where they are planning to go and roughly what time, I also get sent a Meet card. I generally make sure the horses are on my bottom field which is flat and I make sure I am there to keep an eye on them. One takes very little notice, the other two usually have a trot round and then stand and watch, the hunt usually passes fairly quickly and although can still be heard once away from the immediate area the horses settle very quickly. Because they are not used to being in I find if I put two in they get more stressed and for longer than if I leave them out. However I would not leave them out if I could not be there just in case of accidents.
 

Red-1

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Recently bought into cob culture.
Our hunt used to drop me a card in, and if there were any extras, someone would phone to let me know.

Then the law changed, and I was no longer contacted, in case people who were contacted who weren't members told the antis.

The other year, they marauded through private land without permission, several times, on different days. One shetland died of colic. Another horse ran through a fence. After that, they were uninvited by one of the hosts, and although invited by a different person, they have generally been more respectful since.

If I know they are coming, I keep mine in, with a grid.
 

Neddie123

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13 September 2020
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I would think carefully about the risk of having your horses at home in this situation as in my experience, the hunt couldn’t give a toss about any stress or damage caused. Just last year they were chasing a fox (the law doesn’t apply to them) who had sought refuge in a field at the livery yard. Horses in fields going absolutely crazy inc. one that ended up with a very nasty fence injury. Despite frantic horses, they still pursued.

Potentially, finding out when they are likely to be around may help but you’re likely going to have to stable & sedate.

I contacted my MP about the matter and he just said to call 101 who equally couldn’t care less and thats when you manage to get through. I find it ludicrous and bizarre that everyone has to accommodate for them.
Had similar experiences - our hunt come by twice a week during hunt season, had the whole pack go right through my horses field on one occasion, causing carnage. Be thankful you don't have to deal with it regularly. It's changed my views on anything other than bloodhound/drag hunts.
 

MissMoo

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3 January 2008
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887
Thank you all very much for your advice and thoughts. I am really reluctant to bring them home as I love where they are but I can see it from my partners view also in that we have a field and stables which are being wasted (that said it looks like the hay will keep the horses fed this year!) The hunt situation really does concern me, my partner is oblivious to the potential damage it may cause and just thinks I'm being daft. Yesterday I had an email letting me know they are hunting round us in the next couple of weeks and provided dates, I'm going to assess how close they come again this year and have a think on what to do next year....
 

Tiddlypom

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You are very fortunate to be in an area where your local pack will notify you in advance when they are coming. Of course all packs should do this to local landowners, but many don't.

It's the unexpected incursions that mostly cause the havoc. I hope that you find a way to manage your horses on hunting days.
 

Lou27

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3 December 2020
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45
Had similar experiences - our hunt come by twice a week during hunt season, had the whole pack go right through my horses field on one occasion, causing carnage. Be thankful you don't have to deal with it regularly. It's changed my views on anything other than bloodhound/drag hunts.
I really feel for you and fully agree. The incident I described had such an impact that I left that yard and wouldn’t stable anywhere near where they operate anymore. I’ve also had to change my dog walking routes because it left me traumatised, I don’t ever want to run the risk of coming across them again.
 
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